Dutch general election, 1994

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Dutch general election, 1994
Netherlands
1989 ←
3 May 1994 → 1998

All 150 seats to the House of Representatives
76 seats were needed for a majority
Turnout 78.8%
  First party Second party Third party
  Wim Kok Elco Brinkman Frits Bolkestein
Leader Wim Kok Elco Brinkman Frits Bolkestein
Party PvdA CDA VVD
Leader since 1986 1994 1990
Last election 49 seats, 31.9% 54 seats, 35.3% 22 seats, 14.6%
Seats won 37 34 31
Seat change Decrease12 Decrease20 Increase9
Popular vote 2,153,135 1,996,418 1,792,401
Percentage 24.0% 22.2% 20.0%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Hans van Mierlo Blank.jpg GreenLeft-1994.jpg
Leader Hans van Mierlo Jet Nijpels Ina Brouwer &
Mohamed Rabbae
Party D66 AOV GL
Leader since 1986 1994 1994
Last election 12 seats, 7.9% 6 seats, 4.1%
Seats won 24 6 5
Seat change Increase12 Increase6 Decrease1
Popular vote 1,391,202 326,401 311,399
Percentage 15.5% 3.6% 3.5%

  Seventh party Eighth party Ninth party
  Hans Janmaat Leen van Dijke Bas van der Vlies
Leader Hans Janmaat Leen van Dijke Bas van der Vlies
Party CD RPF SGP
Leader since 1984 1994 1986
Last election 1 seats, 0.9% 1 seats, 1.0% 3 seats, 1.9%
Seats won 3 3 2
Seat change Increase2 Increase2 Decrease1
Popular vote 220,734 158,705 155,251
Percentage 2.5% 1.8% 1.7%

Tweede Kamerverkiezingen 1994.png


Prime Minister before election

Ruud Lubbers
CDA

Prime Minister

Wim Kok
PvdA

General elections were held in the Netherlands on 3 May 1994.[1] The Labour Party emerged as the largest party, winning 37 of the 150 seats in the House of Representatives.[2] The election resulted in significant losses for both the Labour Party and the Christian Democratic Appeal. The two liberal parties, People's Party for Freedom and Democracy and Democrats 66 made large gains, whilst two pro-elderly parties and the Socialist Party all passed the electoral threshold to win seats.

The formation of a government coalition was arduous but after four months the First Kok cabinet was formed. It was an unprecedented coalition of the two liberal parties and Labour. The CDA was consigned to opposition for the first time in its history. It was also the first government since 1918 not to include a Christian Democratic party.

Results[edit]

Party Votes % Seats +/–
Labour Party 2,153,135 24.0 37 –12
Christian Democratic Appeal 1,996,418 22.2 34 –20
People's Party for Freedom and Democracy 1,792,401 20.0 31 +9
Democrats 66 1,391,202 15.5 24 +12
General Elderly Alliance 326,401 3.6 6 New
GreenLeft 311,399 3.5 5 –1
Centre Democrats 220,734 2.5 3 +2
Reformatory Political Federation 158,705 1.8 3 +2
Reformed Political Party 155,251 1.7 2 –1
Reformed Political League 119,158 1.3 2 0
Socialist Party 118,768 1.3 2 +2
Union 55+ 78,147 0.9 1 New
Centre Party '86 32,327 0.4 0 New
Natural Law Party 27,665 0.3 0 New
Progressive Integration Party 17,230 0.2 0 New
The Greens 13,902 0.2 0 0
New Communist Party of the Netherlands 11,630 0.1 0 New
Solidarity Farmers' Party 9,096 0.1 0 New
Party for Environment and Justice 8,716 0.1 0 New
Solidarity '93 7,919 0.1 0 New
Pacifist Socialist Party '92 7,385 0.1 0 New
The New Party 6,825 0.1 0 New
General Democratic Party 5,196 0.1 0 New
Patriotic Democratic Appeal 4,845 0.1 0 New
Socialist Alternative Politics 4,347 0.1 0 0
Libertarian Party 2,754 0.0 0 New
Invalid/blank votes 46,331
Total 9,027,887 100 150 0
Registered voters/turnout 11,455,924 78.8
Source: Nohlen & Stöver, European Elections Database
Popular Vote
PvdA
  
23.97%
CDA
  
22.23%
VVD
  
19.96%
D66
  
15.49%
AOV
  
3.63%
GL
  
3.47%
CD
  
2.46%
RPF
  
1.77%
SGP
  
1.73%
GPV
  
1.33%
SP
  
1.32%
Unie 55+
  
0.87%
Other
  
1.78%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nohlen, D & Stöver, P (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p1396 ISBN 978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. ^ Nohlen & Stöver, p1414

Further reading[edit]

  • Irwin, Galen A. "The Dutch Parliamentary Election of 1994," Electoral Studies (1995) 14#1 pp. 72-77