Dwellingup, Western Australia

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Dwellingup
Western Australia
Dwellingup is located in Western Australia
Dwellingup
Dwellingup
Coordinates 32°43′S 116°04′E / 32.72°S 116.06°E / -32.72; 116.06Coordinates: 32°43′S 116°04′E / 32.72°S 116.06°E / -32.72; 116.06
Population 383 (2011)[1]
Established 1910
Postcode(s) 6213
Elevation 267 m (876 ft)
Location 97 km (60 mi) S of Perth
LGA(s) Shire of Murray
State electorate(s) Murray-Wellington
Federal Division(s) Canning
Mean max temp Mean min temp Annual rainfall
21.7 °C
71 °F
9.5 °C
49 °F
1,253.7 mm
49.4 in

Dwellingup is a town in Western Australia, located in a timber and fruitgrowing area in the Darling Range east-south-east of Pinjarra. At the 2011 census, Dwellingup had a population of 383.[1]

Name[edit]

Townsite lots were surveyed at this place by Surveyor W.F. Rudall in 1909 after the Lands Department became aware that the site was planned as the terminus of the "Pinjarra-Marrinup Railway". Names suggested for the place by Rudall were "Dwellingerup" or "Marrinup", after nearby brooks, or "McLarty" after a local MLA who had been very active concerning the railway. Surveyor General H.F. Johnston chose "Dwellingupp" after being misinformed regarding the spelling of Dwellingerup Brook. Ignoring a suggestion from the Under Secretary to amend the name to "Dwellingdown", the Minister for Lands approved the name as "Dwellingup" in December 1909. Eventually, the spelling "Dwellingupp" was chosen by order of the Under Secretary for Lands, and the townsite was gazetted as Dwellingupp in February 1910. The spelling was amended to Dwellingup in 1915. Dwellingup is an Aboriginal name said to mean "place of nearby water".

Bushfires[edit]

In arguably Western Australia's worst bushfire, many small surrounding communities in the area were destroyed including 132 houses in Dwellingup itself in the fires of 1961. There were no fatalities, but 800 people were left homeless. The town was rebuilt.[2]

Dwellingup experienced serious bushfires again over the week starting on 3 February 2007. Sixteen houses were destroyed and thousand of hectares of private property and forest were burnt. There was no loss of life.[3][4]

Bauxite mining[edit]

Dwellingup is near the largest bauxite mine in the world at Huntly [5] which supplies ore to the Pinjarra and Kwinana aluminium refineries.

Facilities[edit]

Dwellingup is also home to Nanga Bush Camp, a popular camp for senior primary schools and high schools. Some of the activities at Nanga Bush Camp include water rafting, night watching, a swimming area and bush tracks.[6]

Another major attraction in the area is the Hotham Valley Railway. A Dwellingup Forest Ranger Tour operates between May and October, and is steam hauled between Pinjarra and Dwellingup.[7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "2011 Census Quickstats: Dwellingup". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 31 October 2012. 
  2. ^ Courtney, Joe; Middelmann, Miriam (2005). "Meteorological hazards" (PDF). Natural hazard risk in Perth, Western Australia – Cities Project Perth Report. Geoscience Australia. Retrieved 25 December 2012. 
  3. ^ "Fire recovery work continues in Dwellingup". ABC News. 14 February 2007. Retrieved 25 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "WA blaze contained but crews still busy". ABC News. 5 February 2007. Retrieved 25 December 2012. 
  5. ^ http://www.alcoa.com/australia/en/info_page/mining_huntly_willowdale.asp
  6. ^ "Nanga Bush Camp Website". Western Australia. Retrieved 27 July 2012. 
  7. ^ "Hotham Valley Railway Website". Western Australia. Retrieved 27 July 2012. 

References[edit]