Dwight Clark

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Dwight Clark
No. 87
Wide receiver
Personal information
Date of birth: (1957-01-08) January 8, 1957 (age 57)
Place of birth: Kinston, North Carolina
Career information
College: Clemson
NFL Draft: 1979 / Round: 10 / Pick: 249
Debuted in 1979 for the San Francisco 49ers
Last played in 1987 for the San Francisco 49ers
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • Pro Bowl selection (1981, 1982)
  • All-Pro selection (1981, 1982)
  • Super Bowl champion (XVI, XIX)
  • San Francisco 49ers #87 retired
  • 1988 Inducted into the Clemson Hall Of Fame
  • 1982 UPI 1st Team All-Conf.
  • 1982 Associated Press 1st Team All-NFL
  • 1982 Pro Football Writers 1st Team All-NFL
  • 1982 Newspaper Ent. Assoc 1st Team All-NFL
  • 1982 Pro Football Weekly 1st Team All-NFL
  • 1982 Football Digest 1st Team All-NFL
  • 1982 Sports Illustrated 1st Team All-NFL
  • 1982 Sports Illustrated - NFL Player of the Year
  • 1982 The Len Eshmont Award
  • 1981 UPI 2nd Team All-Conf.
  • Super Bowl XXIII, XXIV & XXIX (member of the 49ers' front office)
Career NFL statistics
Receptions 506
Receiving Yards 6,750
Touchdowns 48
Stats at NFL.com

Dwight Edward Clark (born January 8, 1957) is a former American football wide receiver and executive. He played for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL) from 1979 to 1987. With the 49ers, Clark played on two Super Bowl championship teams. He caught the winning touchdown pass thrown by quarterback Joe Montana in the NFC Championship Game in January 1982 against the Dallas Cowboys. The play, immortalized as "The Catch," propelled the 49ers to their first Super Bowl championship. Clark played college football at Clemson University before being drafted by the 49ers in the 10th round of the 1979 NFL Draft.[1] He served as the general manager of the 49ers in 1998 and in the same capacity with the Cleveland Browns from 1998 to 2002.

Early life[edit]

Clark was born in Kinston, North Carolina and graduated from Garinger High School in Charlotte, North Carolina.

NFL career[edit]

Bill Walsh drafted Clark as the first pick of the 10th round of the 1979 NFL Draft. Clark tallied 506 catches for 6750 yards and 48 touchdowns, along with 50 rushing yards in his nine NFL seasons with the 49ers. He led the NFL in receptions (60) during the strike-shortened 1982 season, and made the Pro Bowl twice, in 1981 and 1982.[2]

"The Catch"[edit]

Clark's most memorable touchdown came in the 1981 NFC Playoffs. On January 10, 1982, against the Dallas Cowboys, the 49ers trailed 27–21 in the final minute of play. Clark leaped and caught a 16-yard pass from quarterback Joe Montana in the back of the end zone to give the 49ers a 28–27 victory and advance to Super Bowl XVI. That play, one of the most famous in the history in the NFL, has been immortalized as "The Catch". Clark finished the game with eight receptions for 120 yards and two touchdowns. During the 1981 season, Walsh had Montana and Clark routinely practice the 20-yard end-zone throw after regular practice.

Retirement and legacy[edit]

After nine seasons with San Francisco 49ers, Clark retired following the 1987 NFL season. Clark was a member of two Super Bowl-winning teams. To honor Clark's contribution to 49ers, the club retired his number 87. After retirement from playing, he has served as a team executive for both the 49ers and the Cleveland Browns as well as starring in the lead role in the 1994 direct-to-video comedy Kindergarten Ninja. Clark has also appeared in the video game, All-Pro Football 2K8. He joined Comcast SportsNet Bay Area in 2011 as an analyst for 49ers Postgame Live. In retirement, Clark expressed remorse about the end of Candlestick Park, saying that “It was a dump [but] it was our dump, so we could talk bad about it, but we didn’t want anybody else to talk bad about it.”[3]

Personal life[edit]

Clark has a son, Mac, and two other children. He currently resides in Santa Cruz, California with his wife, Kelly.[2][4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]