Dwight Foster (1757–1823)

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Dwight Foster
DFoster.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 2nd & 4th district
In office
March 4, 1793 – June 6, 1800
Preceded by Benjamin Goodhue (2nd)
Henry Dearborn, George Thatcher, Peleg Wadsworth (General ticket) (4th)
Succeeded by William Lyman (2nd)
Levi Lincoln, Sr. (4th)
United States Senator
from Massachusetts
In office
June 6, 1800 – March 2, 1803
Preceded by Samuel Dexter
Succeeded by Timothy Pickering
9th Sheriff of
Worcester County, Massachusetts
In office
1792–1793
Preceded by John Sprague
Succeeded by William Caldwell
Personal details
Born (1757-12-07)December 7, 1757
Brookfield, Massachusetts
Died April 29, 1823(1823-04-29) (aged 65)
Brookfield, Massachusetts
Resting place Brookfield Cemetery
Brookfield, Massachusetts
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s) Rebecca Faulkner
Relations Theodore Foster
Dwight Foster MA
Children Alfred Dwight Foster
Alma mater Brown University
Harvard University
Profession Law

Dwight Foster (December 7, 1757 – April 29, 1823) was an American lawyer and politician from Massachusetts. He served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate.

Early life[edit]

Foster was born in Brookfield, Massachusetts and attended the common schools in Brookfield. He graduated from the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations (the former name of Brown University) at Providence in 1774.[1] He then studied law and was admitted to the bar association in 1778. He remained in Rhode Island to practice law, beginning his law practice in Providence. He received his Master's degree from Harvard University in 1784.[2]

Career[edit]

After returning to Massachusetts, Foster held various positions in the government. He served as justice of the peace for Worcester County from 1781-1823, as special justice of the court of common pleas in 1792, and as sheriff of Worcester County in 1792.[3] In 1791, he was elected as a Federalist candidate to the Massachusetts House of Representatives.

He was elected as a United States House of Representatives to the 3rd United States Congress in 1793, and was reelected to the three succeeding Congresses. He served in Congress from March 4, 1793 until his resignation on June 6, 1800.[4] While in Congress, he was Chairman of the United States Senate Committee on Claims.

In 1799, he was a delegate to the State constitutional convention[5] and on June 6, 1800 he was elected to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by Samuel Dexter's resignation.[6] He served in the Senate until his resignation on March 2, 1803. He was a member of the State House from 1808-1809 and a member of the Massachusetts Governor's Council in 1818.[7]

Foster died in Brookfield on April 29, 1823, aged 65,[8] and is interred in Brookfield Cemetery there.[9]

Family life[edit]

Foster's father was Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Justice Jedediah Foster, who graduated from Harvard University in 1744.[10] Foster married Rebecca Faulkner on May 7, 1783, and they had one son, Alfred Dwight Foster.[11]

He was the brother of U.S. Senator Theodore Foster,[12] and was the grandfather and namesake of Massachusetts Attorney General and Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Justice Dwight Foster MA.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brown University (1914). Historical Catalogue of Brown University. Brown University. p. 709. 
  2. ^ Harvard University (1900). Quinquennial Catalogue of the Officers and Graduates of Harvard University. The University. p. 316. 
  3. ^ Pierce, Clifton Pierce (1899). Foster genealogy, Part 1. Press o W.B. Conkey company. p. 64. 
  4. ^ Poore, Benjamin Perley (1878). The Political Register and Congressional Directory: A Statistical Record of the Federal Officials, Legislative, Executive, and Judicial, of the United States of America, 1776-1878. Houghton, Osgood. p. 399. 
  5. ^ Wilson, James Grant and Fiske, John Fiske (1888). Appleton's Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Volume 2. Gale Research Compan. p. 511. 
  6. ^ Poore, Benjamin Perley (1878). The Political Register and Congressional Directory: A Statistical Record of the Federal Officials, Legislative, Executive, and Judicial, of the United States of America, 1776-1878. Houghton, Osgood. p. 399. 
  7. ^ Brown University (1914). Historical Catalogue of Brown University. Brown University. p. 55. 
  8. ^ Pierce, Clifton Pierce (1899). Foster genealogy, Part 1. Press o W.B. Conkey company. p. 64. 
  9. ^ "Hughes-Bemis & Evans-Thor(e)son Families". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 3, 2014. 
  10. ^ Miller,, J. (1885). Rhode Island Historical Society Collections, Volume 7. J. Miller,. p. 111. 
  11. ^ "Hughes-Bemis & Evans-Thor(e)son Families". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 3, 2014. 
  12. ^ "FOSTER, Theodore, (1752 - 1828)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved April 3, 2014. 
  13. ^ Mull, Carol E. (2010). The Underground Railroad in Michigan. McFarland,. p. 66. 

External links[edit]



United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Benjamin Goodhue
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district

1793–1795
alongside:William Lyman, Theodore Sedgwick, Artemas Ward
on a General Ticket
Succeeded by
William Lyman
Preceded by
Henry Dearborn, George Thatcher, Peleg Wadsworth, General Ticket
(Maine District)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's 4th congressional district

1795–1799
Succeeded by
Levi Lincoln, Sr.
United States Senate
Preceded by
Samuel Dexter
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Massachusetts
1800–1803
Served alongside: Jonathan Mason
Succeeded by
Timothy Pickering