E. S. P. Haynes

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Edmund Sidney Pollock Haynes (26 September 1877 – 5 January 1949) was a British lawyer and writer.

The son of a London solicitor, Haynes was a King's Scholar at Eton College and a winner of a Brackenbury Scholarship at Balliol College. Haynes practised in the same offices at 9 New Square, Lincoln's Inn, where his father had practised. A prolific author, he was a well-known figure in London's literary circles from 1900 to his death in 1949.

Hilaire Belloc's The Servile State is dedicated to Haynes.

Publications[edit]

  • Standards of Taste in Art (1904).
  • Religious Persecution, a Study in Political Psychology (1904; popular edition, 1906).
  • Early Victorian and Other Papers (1908).
  • Divorce Problems of To-Day (1912).
  • The Belief in Personal Immortality (1913 and 1925).
  • A Study in Bereavement, a Comedy in One Act (1914).
  • Divorce as it might be (1915).
  • The Decline of Liberty in England (1916).
  • Personalia (1918 and 1927).
  • The Case for Liberty (1919).
  • Concerning Solicitors (1920).
  • The Enemies of Liberty (1923).
  • Fritto Misto (1924).
  • Lycurgus or The Future of Law (1925).
  • Much Ado about Women (1927).
  • A Lawyer's Notebook (1932).
  • More from a Lawyer's Notebook (1933).
  • The Lawyer's Last Notebook (1934).
  • Divorce and its Problems (with Derek Walker-Smith, 1935).
  • Life, Law, and Letters (1936).