EMD F3

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EMD F3
BN 9762 in Yakima Aug 71 NthCstHiRP.jpg
BN #9762, ex-NP #6502, leading the North Coast Hiawatha into Yakima, Washington in August 1971.
Specifications
Power type Diesel-electric
Builder General Motors Electro-Motive Division (EMD)
Model F3
Build date July 1945 – February 1949
Total produced 1,111 A units, 696 B units
AAR wheel arr. B-B
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Trucks Blomberg B
Wheel diameter 40 in (1,016 mm)
Minimum curve 23° (250 ft (76.20 m) radius)
Wheelbase 39 ft (11.89 m)
Length 51 ft 2 14 in (15.60 m)
Width 10 ft 8 in (3.25 m)
Height 15 ft (4.57 m)
Locomotive weight 234,000 lb (106,000 kg)
Fuel capacity 1,200 US gal (4,500 L)
Prime mover EMD 567B
Engine RPM range 275-800
Engine type Two-stroke diesel
Aspiration Roots-type supercharger
Displacement 9,072 cu in (148.66 L)
Generator EMD D-12
Traction motors (4) EMD D-17-B or D-27-B
Cylinders V16
Cylinder size 8 12 in × 10 in (216 mm × 254 mm)
Power output 1,500 hp (1.1 MW)
Tractive effort 58,500 lb (26,500 kg)
Career


The EMD F3 was a 1,500-horsepower (1,100 kW), B-B freight- and passenger-hauling diesel locomotive produced between July 1945 and February 1949 by General MotorsElectro-Motive Division. Final assembly was at GM-EMD's La Grange, Illinois plant. A total of 1,111 cab-equipped lead A units and 696 cabless booster B units were built.

The F3 was the third model in GM-EMD's highly successful F-unit series of cab unit diesel locomotives, and it was the second most produced of the series. The F3 essentially differed from the EMD F2 in that it used the “new” D12 generator to produce more power, and from the later EMD F7 in electrical equipment. Some late-model F3s had the same D27 traction motors used in the F7, and were nicknamed F5 models.

Engine and powertrain[edit]

The F3 used a 16 cylinder 567B series diesel engine developing 1,500 hp (1.1 MW) at 800 rpm. The 567 was designed specifically for railroad locomotives, a supercharged 2 stroke 45 degree V type with 567 cu in (9.29 L) displacement per cylinder, for a total of 9,072 cu in (148.66 L). A D.C. generator powered four traction motors, two on each Blomberg B truck. EMD has built all of its major components since 1939. [1] [2] [3] [4]

Identification[edit]

As built, the only way to distinguish between the F2 and F3 was the nose number panels on the A units, which were small on the F2 and large on the F3 and subsequent locomotives. However, these could and were often altered by the railroad. Few F2s were built, however.

Early versions of the F3 had the "chicken wire" grilles along the top edge of the carbody. Later production featured a distinctive stamped stainless steel grille.

All F-units introduced after the FT have twin exhaust stacks and four radiator fans arranged close together atop their roofs, unlike the FT's four stacks and separated pairs of fans.

F3 phases[edit]

The identification of locomotive "phases" is a creation of railfans. EMD used no such identification. EMD kept track of the marketing name (F3) and individual locomotives' build numbers. During the production cycle of a model, EMD would make changes. To keep better track of the variations of locomotives identified the same by the manufacturer, railfans began referring to phases; critical changes to a locomotive line.

Despite not being official designations, the phase description is useful. However, many of the changes described are cosmetic, easily changed features of a locomotive; roof fans, body panels, grilles and the like could be and sometimes were updated or swapped.

The following are normally identified as F3 phases:

Phase I[edit]

Built from July 1945. High, flat-topped 36 in (914 mm) roof fans. Top third body panel had "chicken wire" in openings only. Short rear vent panel. Center-third body panel with three equally-spaced porthole windows and D17 traction motors. As-built Phase I F3 units are identical to the F2, they differ only in electrical equipment and numberboard size. Three locomotives survive from this series, rebuilt as FP10s, all for Metro-North Railroad.

Phase II (early)[edit]

Built from February 1947. Top third body panel now had full-length "chicken wire". Long rear vent panel. Center third body panel now had two portholes; area between covered with chicken wire, over 4 smaller rectangular openings.

Phase II (late)[edit]

Built from December 1947. Roof radiator fans change to low, pan-topped items.

Phase III[edit]

Built from March 1948. Center third body panel now has no chicken wire between the portholes; the four rectangular openings now have louvres.

Phase IV[edit]

Built from August 1948. Chicken wire upper-third panel is replaced with full-length horizontal stainless steel grille.

"F5"[edit]

Built from October 1948 through end of F3 production in February 1949. D27 traction motors with heavier-duty cables and higher capacity traction motor blowers fitted.

Original owners[edit]

Railroad Quantity
A units
Quantity
B units
Road numbers
A units
Road numbers
B units
Notes
Electro-Motive Division (demonstrators)
2
2
291A1, 291A2
291B1, 291B2
291A1 to Toledo, Peoria and Western Railway 100A, 291A2 wrecked, 291B1 to TP&W 100B, 291B2 to EMD 754B1, to Monon 65C
Electro-Motive Division (demonstrators)
2
754A1, 754A2
to Monon 85A,B
Electro-Motive Division (demonstrators)
1
951
to Kansas City Southern Railway (Louisiana and Arkansas Railway) 59A
Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad
2
200–201
201 to Richmond Fredericksburg & Potomac 1111
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
12
12
336–347
336B–347B
Atlanta and St. Andrews Bay Railway
1
1501
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway
46
46
16,C–36,C,
200,C–201,C
16A,B–36A,B
200A,B–201A,B
Passenger units, 32A returned to EMD and replaced by 32A (2nd), 32A (1st) rebuilt as F7B, later sold to ATSF as 48A
Freight units
Bangor and Aroostook Railroad
8
4
500A–507A
600B–603B
A units renumbered 40–47, B units to Pennsylvania Railroad 9530B-9536B even. #44 and #46 are repainted lackawanna and are the Oldest operating F3A's as of May, 2014
Boston and Maine Railroad
2
2
4227A–4228A
4227B–4228B
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
67
7
82,A–86,A, 88 (even),
113,A–171,A (odd)
82X,AX–86X,AX, 88X (even)
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
58
52
116A,D–138A,D, 160A,C–162A,C, 9960A,C–9962A,C
116B,C–138B,C, 160B–162B, 9960B–9962B
9960–9962 passenger units
Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad
16
7
1200–1205,
1400–1409
1300–1301,
1500–1504
passenger units
freight units
Chicago Great Western Railway
33
16
101–115A,C, 150–152
101B–112B, 101D–104D
150–152 passenger units
Chicago, Indianapolis and Louisville Railway (“Monon”)
22
5
51A,B–52A,B, 61A,B–64A,B,
81A,B–84A,B, 62B (2nd), 64A (2nd)
61C–64C, 64C (2nd)
81–84 passenger units
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad ("Milwaukee Road")
8
8
80A,D-83A,D
80B,C-83B,C
81D,C-83D,C renumbered 84A,B-86A,B
Canadian National Railway
4
2
9000, 9002, 9003, 9005
9001, 9004
Central Railroad of New Jersey
10
5
50–59
A–E
Chicago and North Western Railway
28
11
4051C–4054C, 4055A,C–4066A,C
4055B–4063B, 4065B–4066B
Clinchfield Railroad
4
3
800–803
850–852
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad
20
16
605A,C–606A,C, 621A,C, 655A–662A, 801A,C–805A,C
605B–606B, 622B, 655B–662B, 801B–805B
Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad
6
6
5521/4–5541/4
5522/3–5542/3
Erie Railroad
24
17
706A,D–710A,D,
800A,D–806A,D
706B,C–710B,C,
800B–806B
Florida East Coast Railway
8
4
501–508
551–554
Georgia Railroad
1
1001
Gulf, Mobile and Ohio Railroad
32
8
800A,B–810A,B, 811A, 880A,B-882A,B, 883A–885A
B60–B64, B80–B82
Great Northern Railway
53
24
225–231, 259A,B, 260A–261A, 262A,B–265A,B, 266A–267A, 306A,C, 350A,C–358A,C, 375C–376C, 430A,D–438A,D (even)
260B–261B, 266B–267B, 306B, 350B–358B, 430B,C–438B,C (even)
350–358 passenger units
Grand Trunk Western Railroad
22
9006–9027
Kansas City Southern Railway
12
12
30A–31A, 50A,D–54A,D
30B–31B, 50B,C–54B,C
Kansas City Southern Railway (Louisiana and Arkansas Railway)
8
8
55A,D–58A,D
55B,C–58B,C
Louisville and Nashville Railroad
2
3
2500–2501
2550–2552
Lehigh Valley Railroad
10
10
510–528 (even)
511–529 (odd)
Maine Central Railroad
8
2
671A–672A, 681–686
671B–672B
Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad
14
7
201A,C–207A,C
201B–207B
Missouri Pacific Railroad
28
16
513–524, 561–576
513B–518B, 561B–570B
Missouri Pacific Railroad (International-Great Northern Railroad)
12
6
525–528, 553–560
525B–526B, 553B–556B
Missouri Pacific Railroad (St. Louis, Brownsville and Mexico Railway)
24
529–552
Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway
6
248A,C, 348A,C, 448A,C
Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railway
9
12
800–808
900–911
Northern Pacific Railway
25
24
6011A,D–6017A,D,
6500A-6506A, 6503C-6506C (2nd)
6011B,C–6015B,C,
6500B,C–6506B,C
6000s freight units, 6500s passenger units, many renumbered.
New York Central Railroad
34
18
1606–1635
3500–3503
2404–2419
3600–3601
Freight units
Passenger units
New York, Ontario and Western Railway
5
2
821–822, 501–503
821B–822B
Pennsylvania Railroad
80
40
9500A–9561A, 9563A-9567A, 9677A–9689A
9500B–9528B, 9540B–9546B, 9548B-9554B (even)
Reading Company
6
6
260A–265A
260B–265B
Seaboard Air Line Railroad
11
4022–4032
St. Louis-San Francisco Railway (“Frisco”)
18
18
5000–5017
5100–5117
Soo Line
10
200A,B–204A,B
Soo Line (Wisconsin Central Railway)
2
1
2200A,B
2200C
Southern Railway
79
65
4128–4206
4320–4384
Southern Railway (Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Pacific Railway)
8
4
6106–6113
6153–6159
Southern Railway (Alabama Great Southern Railroad)
12
6
6702–6713
6750–6755
Southern Railway (New Orleans and North Eastern Railway)
3
1
6804–6806
6829
Southern Pacific Company
80
80
6100A,D–6139A,D
6100B,C–6139B,C
6100A,D-6117A,D to Texas & New Orleans 300-337, 6100B,C-6117B,C to Texas & New Orleans 500-537, 6118A,D-6139A,D renumbered 6138-6179, 6118B,C-6139B,C renumbered 8038-8079
Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway
3
800A1, 800A2, 802
Renumbered 800–801. 801-802 to BN 9750,9752
Union Pacific Railroad
89
90
905–910, 964A–968A, 1400A–1441A, 1442–1463, 1550–1563
905B,C–909B,C (odd), 969B–978B, 1442B–1471B, 1430B,C–1458B,C (even)
964A-968A renumbered 900-904, 1400A-1441A renumbered 1400-1441, 969B-978B renumbered 900B,C-904B,C, 1442B-1471B renumbered 1400B,C-1428B,C (even)
Western Railway of Alabama
1
501
Western Maryland Railway
2
51–52
Western Pacific Railroad
3
6
801A–803A
801B,C–803B,C
Totals 1111 695

Surviving F3 locomotives[edit]

A Metro-North F10 that was formerly an F3 (originally GM&O and later an Illinois Central #880A) in Bridgeport, Connecticut, operates for Metro-North Railroad in 2005. This locomotive also ran for the MBTA.

Twelve F3s survive today at a variety of museums; ten being A units, and two being B units.

Metro-North Railroad still had three F10 units in service, which are rebuilt F3s, before BL20GHs took over. Lately[when?], with the leasing of P40s from Amtrak, their usage of in revenue service has declined. The F10s went to the Shore Line East when the BL20GHs took over. These units were originally built for Gulf, Mobile and Ohio and rebuilt by Illinois Central to F10 status for MBTA. Metro North acquired four of the units, but one was acquired by the Adirondack Scenic Railway for service out of Utica NY. Very few surviving F3 units remain unmodified from their original appearance and specifications.

The Alberta Railway Museum in Edmonton, Alberta owns Canadian National F3 #9000. #9000 was the first diesel road freight locomotive ordered for a Canadian railway, and one of the only six F3's to operate in Canada. #9000 was built in 1948 and was part of an order for six locomotives. [5]

Steamtown National Historic Site in Scranton, Pennsylvania is home to former Bangor and Aroostook F3s 44 (owned by the Tri-State chapter of the NRHS in Morristown, New Jersey) and 46 (owned by the Anthracite Railroads Historical Society). Both engines were initially restored as Jersey Central 56 and 57, but as of 2012 have been repainted as Lackawanna 663 and 664. These engines, along with BAR 42, are the oldest "chicken wire" style F3s in existence, and are used on most long distance excursions from the park. The ARHS also owns a former Boston & Maine F7B (4268B), which has been altered to resemble a F3B. It too is currently located in Scranton, and as of May 2014 has been cosmetically restored as DL&W 664B, with mechanical restoration still to come.

The Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway, the corporate successor to BAR, owns #42, which was renumbered back to its original number, 502, when it was repainted into its original gray and yellow scheme.

The California State Railroad Museum owns Santa Fe No. 347B, which was donated to the museum in March 1986 by Santa Fe. The engine is painted in the railroad's warbonnet scheme and is listed as operable.

The C&O Historical Society owns former Clinchfield Railroad F3 #800. It is currently in C&O passenger livery, but as June 2014 it is rumored to be slated to return to the classic CRR black and yellow.

There is a Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis Railway F3 A unit and B unit stored at the Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum in Chattanooga. However, the A unit is privately owned and restoration is unlikely because of it.

In popular culture[edit]

The main protagonist of the children's television show, Chuggington, Wilson, is based on an EMD F3 power car.[original research?]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pinkpank, Jerry A (1973). The Second Diesel Spotter’s Guide. Kalmbach Books. pp. 13, 26, 90–101. ISBN 0-89024-026-4. 
  2. ^ Ross, David, ed. (2003). The Encyclopedia of Trains and Locomotives. p. 261, 273. ISBN 978-0-7607-9679-5. 
  3. ^ "EMD 567C Engine Manual, EMD FT Manual". rr-fallenflags.org. Retrieved 4 September 2013. 
  4. ^ "EMD’s 567, History and Development". utahrails.net. Retrieved 4 September 2013. 
  5. ^ http://www.railwaymuseum.ab.ca/node/21#9000

Bibliography[edit]

  • Dorin, Patrick C. (1972). Chicago and North Western Power. Superior Publishing. p. 119-121. ISBN 0-87564-715-4. 
  • Furhman, Jim. EMD F2-F3-F5 Phase Chart. Retrieved January 2, 2005
  • Lamb, J. Parker (2007). Evolution of the American Diesel Locomotive. Railroads Past and Present. Bloomington, IN, USA: Indiana University Press. ISBN 9780253348630. 
  • Marre, Louis A. (1995). Diesel Locomotives: The First 50 Years: A Guide to Diesels Built Before 1972. Railroad Reference Series (Book 10). Waukesha, WI, USA: Kalmbach Publishing. ISBN 0890242585. 
  • Pinkepank, Jerry A. (1973). The Second Diesel Spotter’s Guide. Milwaukee, WI: Kalmbach Publishing Company. pp. 7, 12, 26, 91–94. ISBN 0-89024-026-4. 
  • Schafer, Mike (1998). Vintage Diesel Locomotives. Enthusiast Color Series. Osceola, WI, USA: MBI Publishing. ISBN 0760305072. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2000). The American Diesel Locomotive. Osceola, WI, USA: MBI Publishing. ISBN 0760306664. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2005). EMD F-Unit Locomotives. North Branch, MN, USA: Specialty Press. ISBN 1580071929. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2006). EMD Locomotives. St. Paul, MN, USA: Voyageur Press. ISBN 9780760323960. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2010). Vintage Diesel Power. Minneapolis, MN, USA: MBI Publishing. ISBN 9780760337950. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2011). Electro-Motive E-Units and F-Units: The Illustrated History of North America's Favorite Locomotives. Minneapolis, MN, USA: Voyageur Press. ISBN 9780760340073. 
  • Solomon, Brian (2012). North American Locomotives: A Railroad-by-Railroad Photohistory. Minneapolis, MN, USA: Voyageur Press. ISBN 9780760343708. 
  • Wilson, Jeff (1999). F Units: The Diesels That Did It. Golden Years of Railroading series. Waukesha, WI, USA: Kalmbach Publishing. ISBN 0890243743. 

External links[edit]

Media related to EMD F3 locomotives at Wikimedia Commons