EMD SW1

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EMC/EMD SW1
Hugh llewelyn 6589 (5961018035).jpg
PC #8589, still in PRR livery, switching at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1970.
Specifications
Power type Diesel-electric
Builder General Motors Electro-Motive Corp (later Division) (EMC/EMD)
Model SW1
Build date January 1939 (1939-01) – November 1953 (1953-11)
Total produced 661
AAR wheel arr. B-B
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Trucks AAR type A
Wheel diameter 40 in (1,000 mm)
Minimum curve 57°
Wheelbase 30 ft (9.14 m)
Length 44 ft 11 14 in (13.697 m)
Width 10 ft (3.0 m)
Height 14 ft 4 58 in (4.385 m)
Locomotive weight 196,000 lb (89,000 kg)
Prime mover EMD 567 or 567A or 567B
Engine type Two stroke diesel
Displacement 3,402 cu in (55.75 L)
Generator GM D-4
Traction motors (4) GM D-7A
Cylinders V6
Cylinder size 8 12 in × 10 in (216 mm × 254 mm)
Power output 600 hp (447 kW)
Tractive effort 49,000 lb (22,000 kg)
Career
Locale United States


The EMD SW1 is a 600-horsepower (450 kW) diesel-electric switcher locomotive built by General Motors' Electro-Motive Corporation (later Division) between December 1938 and November 1953. Final assembly was at EMD's plant at LaGrange (McCook) Illinois. The SW1 was the second generation of 600 hp switcher from EMD, succeeding the SC (cast frame) and SW (welded frame). The most significant change from those earlier models was the use of an engine of EMD's own design, the then-new 567 engine, here in 600 hp (450 kW) V6 form. 661 locomotives of this design were built, not withstanding diesel switcher production having been suspended between 1942 and 1945 by the War Production Board, as the 567 engines were needed elsewhere, mainly for U.S. Navy LST vessels.

Engine and powertrain[edit]

The SW1 introduced a 6 cylinder version of the 567 (later 567A) series engine to EMC/EMD switchers. Developing 600 hp at 800 r.p.m., this engine remained in production until 1966. Designed specifically for railroad locomotives, this was a supercharged 2 stroke 45 degree V type, with an 8 1/2" bore by 10" stroke giving 567 cubic inches displacement per cylinder. A D.C. generator provides power to four motors, two on each truck, in a B-B arrangement. The SW1, like most EMD switchers, use the AAR Type A switcher truck. EMC/ EMD has built all its own components since 1939.[1][2]

Production changes[edit]

Like most long-running locomotive models, a number of changes were made to the SW1 over its production life. Internally, the post-1945 locomotives were somewhat improved, and used an updated 567A engine.

One easily spotted change is the shape of the two center cab windows over the hood, which were curved to follow the roofline originally, but became flat-topped after mid-1950. Another easily seen is the taper of the hood to the cab, which was a two-stage taper in earlier units but became a single taper in later production. Very early locomotives were delivered with a stubby exhaust stack, but this did not lift the diesel exhaust sufficiently clear of crew visibility. All later units were delivered with EMD's standard conical switcher stack, while early units were generally modified with taller stacks too. Early locomotives had a single large headlight, while later had twin sealed-beam headlights.[3]

Identification[edit]

The SW1 appears very similar to its SC and SW predecessors, but has only a single stack instead of two, a significantly shorter hood and a larger rear platform, no small louvers on the front top hood sides, and a large grille instead of lifting vents on top of the hood front. The sandbox in front of the radiator is somewhat smaller on the SW1.

Compared to later EMD switchers, the SW1 has a much shorter hood, large platforms at each end, a single exhaust stack, and a large 'satchel' type sandbox.

Original owners[edit]

Railroad Quantity Road numbers Notes
Allegheny and South Side Railway
1
101
Allis-Chalmers
1
8
Angelina and Neches River Railroad
1
10
Atlantic and East Carolina Railway
1
9
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad
1
1901
Rejected, to Richmond Terminal Railroad #1
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad
22
200–221
Ballard Terminal Railroad
1
98
Boston and Maine Railroad
24
1109–1132
Broward County Port Authority
1
400
Buffalo Creek Railroad
1
42
Canton Railroad
5
21–25
Central Indiana Railroad
1
1
Central of Georgia Railroad
3
2, 3, 7
Central of New Jersey
4
1109–1112
Chattanooga Traction Company
1
4
Chicago and Eastern Illinois Railroad
5
95–99
Chicago and North Western Railway
20
1207–1212, 1214, 1215,
1268–1270, 1272–1278,
1271, 1279
Chicago District Electric Generating
2
3, 4
Chicago Short Line Railway
2
200–201
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad
20
9136–9153
Chicago, Indianapolis and Louisville Railroad
3
50, 5, 6
Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway
1
55
Chihuahua Forests
1
500
only unit exported
Cleveland Quarries
1
2
Commonwealth Edison
6
10–15
Conemaugh and Black Lick Railroad
6
60–65
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad
11
427–437
Detroit Edison
3
210–212
Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad
2
900–901
re-engined with 8-567B 800 hp engines, new hoods 1952. Reclassified SW8.
Donner-Hanna Coke
1
1
Elgin, Joliet and Eastern Railroad
27
220–246
EMD (demonstrator units)*
7
755, 804, 905, 906,
911, 700, 152
EMC 755 was the first SW1
Erie Railroad
1
360
Fort Worth and Denver Railway
2
602, 604
Fort Worth Belt
1
1
Galveston Wharves
5
201–205
Garden City Western Railway
1
201
Georgia and Florida Railroad
3
70–72
Georgia Marble Company
1
1
Granite City Steel
2
600–601
Great Lakes Steel
14
12, 14–18, 22,
30, 31, 33–36, 38
Great Northern Railway
9
5101–5105, 80–83
5101–5105 renumbered
Great Western Railway of Colorado
2
61, 62
Hanna Furnace Company
3
14–16
Houston Belt and Terminal Railway
1
10
Illinois Central Railroad
19
9014–9032
Inland Steel Company
12
54, 57, 70–73, 76–81
Lehigh Portland Cement Company
1
5
Lehigh Valley Railroad
6
112–119
Nº 114 is currently owned by Wilmington & Western Railroad
Louisiana Midland Railway
1
11
Louisville and Nashville Railroad
5
11–15
Manufacturers' Junction Railway
1
6
Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad
1
70
Mathieson Chemical
2
1–2
McLouth Steel
3
3–5
Memphis union station
1
10
Metropolitan Sanitary District of Greater Chicago
3
1–3
Milwaukee Road
25
1610–1634
renumbered
Missouri Pacific Railroad
10
9004–9006, 9011, 9200–9205
Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railway
1
15
New York Central Railroad
81
600–621 (first), 622–654,
580–599, 600–621 (second)
Nickel Plate Road
2
105–106
Pennsylvania Railroad
81
5910, 5944–5953, 5987–5999,
9104, 9137–9154, 9200–9203, 9205,
9396–9428
Pere Marquette Railroad
2
10–11
Phelps Dodge Corporation
1
A
Philadelphia, Bethlehem and New England Railroad
9
212–218, 220, 221
Public Service Company of Northern Illinois
3
9–11
Portland Traction Company (Oregon)
2
100, 200
Reading Railroad
9
16–23
Republic Steel
22
50–54, 300–306, 340–341,
352, 370–372, 890–891, 893–894
Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad
18
529–546
Roscoe, Snyder and Pacific Railway
1
100
Sahara Coal Company
2
(no numbers)
Seaboard Air Line Railroad
1
1200
Soo Line Railroad
1
320
Southern Railway
9
2002–2004, 2007–2011, 8565
Southern Pacific Railroad
14
1004–1016
St. Joseph Belt Railroad
1
11
St. Joseph Terminal Railroad
2
1–2
St. Louis – San Francisco Railway
1
10
Tennessee Coal and Iron Railroad
4
1000–1003
Terminal Railroad Association of St Louis
8
501–508
Union Railroad
22
455–476
US Department of Defense (US Army)
4
7001–7004
Wabash Railroad
11
101–111
Warner Sand and Gravel Company
1
15
Western Pacific Railroad
2
502–503
Wheeling Steel Company
4
1001–1004
North Western Railway of Mexico
1
500
  • As of 2013, Amtrak still has one SW1 on their roster. #737 is used for switching chores at the Wilmington Delaware shops.

Preservation[edit]

  • The Wilmington and Western Railroad owns and operates two SW1s in tourist passenger service. One is from the Baltimore and Ohio, and the other is from the Lehigh Valley.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pinkepank, Jerry A (1973). The Second Diesel Spotter’s Guide. Kalmbach Books. pp. 10, 26, 35. LCCN 66-22894 Check |lccn= value (help). 
  2. ^ Ross, David, ed. (2003). The Encyclopedia of Trains and Locomotives. p. 264. ISBN 978-0-7607-9679-5. 
  3. ^ Pinkepank, Jerry A (1973). The Second Diesel Spotter’s Guide. Kalmbach Books. p. 35. LCCN 66-22894 Check |lccn= value (help). 
  4. ^ http://www.montevideomrhc.org/
  • Dorin, Patrick C. (1972). Chicago and NorthWestern Power. Superior Publishing. p. 96. ISBN 0-87564-715-4. 
  • Pinkepank, Jerry A. (1973). The Second Diesel Spotter's Guide. Kalmbach Publishing Co., Milwaukee, WI. ISBN 0-89024-026-4. 
  • (July 2005), "Preservation Briefs", Trains Magazine, p. 71.
  • TrainWeb.com. The Unofficial EMD homepage. Retrieved on January 7, 2005. Contains fairly complete builders' records for early EMD production.
  • Andersen Windows 3110. Retrieved on December 7, 2012

External links[edit]