ETAOI keyboard

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ETAOI keyboard is a text input software for touch screen-reliant devices. It is based on ETAOI method for coding.

The keyboard uses five keys.[1] Characters and signs are typed using single and multiple taps, or slides.[2] There are unique combinations of taps and slides for each character.

With no upper limit on the number of keys on which each combination is based, the keyboard can be used for typing an unlimited variety of characters.[3] Combinations encompassing up to three keys are used for typing in Latin-derived alphabets.

Name and mechanics[edit]

ETAOI name is derived from the 5 most frequently used letters in English: e, t, a, o, i. These characters are typed using just single taps.

The same efficiency-driven approach has been followed when assigning meaningful combinations of taps and slides to all other letters, numbers and signs: the most frequently used ones are also the quickest to produce. This constitutes a radical departure from the QWERTY layout, where the position of specific letters remains unrelated to the frequency of their use.[4]

Application[edit]

Because to its novel conceptual basis, ETAOI is particularly well suited for use with screens of limited size.[5] Once mastered, its five keys allow for touch typing (typing without looking) commonly associated with physical keyboards. Top recorded speeds are currently 55 words per minute.

With all the keys presented as just one horizontal line placed at the screen’s bottom edge, the keyboard allows the viewing area to be used much more effectively as it usually takes only a third of the space required by QWERTY keyboard variants. The keys’ larger size results in a significantly reduced number of typing errors.

Other benefits include immediate access to characters other than letters without the need to recall additional screens, by simply applying the relevant combinations of taps and slides. In the same manner, the software can be used to quickly produce letters specific to only some Latin-derived alphabets. Languages currently supported are Spanish, German, French, Italian and Polish.

The keyboard also includes a suite of editing tools with in-built commands allowing to precisely select, copy and paste text.

Learning[edit]

Given its novelty, ETAOI keyboard is accompanied by a wide range of training materials. These aim to reduce the initial learning times to about 40–60 minutes.

ETAOI alphabet is the recommended starting training programme. It helps the user memorize all the combinations, from the most frequently encountered to the least common ones.

ETAOI speed helps the user learn how to type quicker, with the training material consisting of the most popular words, as well as pangrams (sentences using all letters of the alphabet).[6]

Availability[edit]

The keyboard is currently available on the Google Play and includes versions for smart phones and tablet computers.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Escribe de manera diferente con Morse Keyboard y ETAOI Keyboard". LOS ENSAYOS. Retrieved 29 May 2012. 
  2. ^ Simpson, Joe. "Alternative Keyboard Shootout!". Land of Droid. Retrieved 29 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Lund, Emmanuel. "AndroidZoom". Retrieved 29 May 2012. 
  4. ^ Karol, Manys (16–29 April 2012). "Jak pisać łatwiej, czyli rewolucja pięciu kolorowych klawiszy". Bloomberg Businessweek Polska (8/12): 43. 
  5. ^ kschang. "Android Soft Keyboard Alternatives: Comparing 48 different (free) input methods from ABC Keyboard to ZetaType for Droid". HubPages. 
  6. ^ "Android apps review". Retrieved 29 May 2012.