eVe Buigues

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Eve Buigues is a songwriter and a singer. She founded the Los Angeles band Jariya[1] and The Jazz In Paris Project[2] in the UK. She blogs professionally for the Live 2 Play Network[3] and coaches professional artists.

Biography[edit]

eVe Buigues was born in Troyes, France, on 7 January 1968. She has one sibling, Plume Buigues, a lighting designer. The Buigues sisters are close relatives of the late French cartoonist Jean Cabu.

Buigues studied piano and singing at the honour Legion School[4] in Paris from 1986 to 1988. It was in boarding school that she began to write songs and to perform in front of a small group of schoolmates. In the summer of 1988, she recorded a two-song demo which got her a place in the SACEM school of music.

In 1989, she was signed by senior executive Daniel Goldsmith at EMI Publishing, after he noticed her at a school performance. Goldsmith left EMI a year later and eVe's publishing/record deal was dropped. Buigues moved to Boston in 1990 to continue her studies at the Berklee School of Music. In 1991, she fronted the Berklee Gospel choir in the 25th Anniversary National Gospel Choir Competition and that same year she formed her first band, eVe'n Up, with schoolmates Adrian Harpham and Daniel Day.

In 1995, Buigues moved to Los Angeles where she founded the band Jariya with Berklee friend Andrea Bensmiller. Jariya produced three independently released albums. Jariya shows took place in small local theatres and featured video art, instrument swapping, experimental lighting (usually designed by Buigues's sister), poi spinning, Tibetan chanting and special guest musicians.

In 2002, Jariya were noticed by star producers Rodney and Freddie Jerkins, who recorded a demo of their song, Perfect Drug. Disagreements about the direction the band should take led to no further work with the Jerkins but Jariya still went on to release their third album, YaYa, which is predominantly about their close encounter with the LA music business.

Buigues became an American citizen in 2006 but relocated to the UK a year later, stating that she was too upset about the current American political climate. Jariya was subsequently broken up and in 2008 Buigues founded The Jazz In Paris Project[5] featuring Kevin Glasgow on guitar.

Buigues has produced music for television, film and media. Her work has featured in films Notorious C.H.O.,[6] television shows Jag, Cities of the Underworld, Date Patrol, Lifeline, web series Selene's Hollywood Confidential,[7] animation The Grocery Store, starring Margaret Cho, Kathleen Madigan's comedy special and the History Channel.

In 2012/13, Buigues composed the scores for Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, directed by Giles Forman,[8] which was performed at the Arcola Theatre, London, and The Phoenician Women.

Buigues created a teaching method that merges meditation and singing. She coaches professional singers to connect mind and body in order to improve their performance . Her most recent clients have been rapper Tinie Tempah, singer Sasha Keable Voices (Disclosure song), and blues singer Dan Owen.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ya ya, Jariya". Amazon.co.uk. 9 September 2009. Retrieved 1 May 2011. 
  2. ^ "The Jazz In Paris Project". The Jazz In Paris Project. Retrieved 1 May 2011. 
  3. ^ {{cite weblurl=http://l2pnet.com/search/node/eve%20buigues}}
  4. ^ {{cite weblurl=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maison_d'%C3%A9ducation_de_la_L%C3%A9gion_d'honneur}}
  5. ^ "The Jazz In Paris Project". The Jazz In Paris Project. Retrieved 1 May 2011. 
  6. ^ Notorious C.H.O. : Margaret Cho filmed live in concert Screen World - Volume 54 John A. Willis, Daniel C. Blum - 2003- Page 81 "Kristin Zavorska; Associate Producer, Ran Barker; Music, Greg Burns, Jeff Burns, Andrea Bensmiller, Eve Buigues; a Cho Taussig production; Color; Not rated; 95 minutes; Release date: July 3, 2002; "
  7. ^ "Selene’s Hollywood Confidential – Episode 1". Selene Luna. Retrieved 1 May 2011. 
  8. ^ Template:Cite weblurl=http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3066362

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