Eadem mutata resurgo

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Eadem mutata resurgo (Word-for-word translation: Same having-changed I-rise) is a Latin phrase that literally translates to "Although changed, I arise the same" or "I rise again changed but the same". The phrase was first known to be used by Jakob Bernoulli (1654-1705), a member of the famous Swiss mathematical family, and appears on his tombstone in Basel. Bernoulli was referring to the fact, that the logarithmic spirals are self-similar, meaning that upon applying any similarity transformation to the spiral, the resulting spiral is congruent to the original untransformed one.[1] The logarithmic spiral continually appears in nature, such as with the curves of the Nautilus shell.[2]

The College of St Hild and St Bede at the University of Durham adopted this phrase for its signatory logo.[3] It is also the motto of the Collège de 'pataphysique.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eli Maor, E: Story of a Number ( Princeton University Press, 2009: ISBN 0-691-14134-7), p. 127.
  2. ^ Eli Maor, E: Story of a Number ( Princeton University Press, 2009: ISBN 0-691-14134-7), p. 127.
  3. ^ The College of St Hild and St Bede (pdf).
  4. ^ Collège de 'pataphysique Collection.