Eadwold of Cerne

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Cerne Abbey ruins.

Eadwold of Cerne, was a 9th-century, hermit, Anglian Prince and Patron Saint of Cerne, Dorset, who live as a hermit on a hill about four miles from Cerne. His Feast day is 29 August.

Life[edit]

St. Eadwold was born about 835AD, the son of Æthelweard of East Anglia[1] and reputed brother of Edmund, king of East Anglia. He left his homeland possibly due to Viking Invasion, to live as a hermit on a hill about four miles from Cerne, Dorset. William of Malmesbury said he lived on bread and water,[2] and worked many miracles.[3] He is known from the writing of William of Malmesbury and the Hagiographies of St Eadwold of Cerne, by Goscelin of Saint-Bertin and also Secgan.

Veneration[edit]

Eadwold died, Aug 29, c900 at Cerne in Dorset and is said to have been buried in his cell,[4] and was later translated to a nearby monastery, dedicated to St Peter.[5] and his veneration is credited with making that Abbey the third richest in England during the 11th Century.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eadwold of Cerne
  2. ^ Michael Winterbottom, Rodney Malcolm Thomson, William of Malmesbury: Gesta Pontificum Anglorum, The History of the English Bishops : Volume I: Text and Translation: Volume I: Text and Translation (Oxford University Press, 2007) page 291
  3. ^ Edwold (Eadwold) of Cerne in The Oxford Dictionary of Saints
  4. ^ Licence, Tom (2007) '‘Goscelin of Saint-Bertin and the hagiography of St Eadwold of Cerne’'. Journal of Medieval Latin, vol16
  5. ^ Licence, Tom (2007) '‘Goscelin of Saint-Bertin and the hagiography of St Eadwold of Cerne’'. Journal of Medieval Latin, vol16
  6. ^ Tom Licence, Goscelin of St Bertin and the Life of St. Eadwold of Cerne, Journal The Journal of Medieval Latin vol 16