Earl Seibert

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Earl Seibert
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1963
Born (1911-12-07)December 7, 1911
Berlin, ON, CAN
Died May 12, 1990(1990-05-12) (aged 78)
Agawam, MA, USA
Height 6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight 200 lb (91 kg; 14 st 4 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Right
Played for New York Rangers
Chicago Black Hawks
Detroit Red Wings
Playing career 1931–1947

Walter Earl Seibert (December 7, 1911 - May 12, 1990) was a Canadian ice hockey defenceman who played for 15 seasons for the Chicago Black Hawks, New York Rangers and Detroit Red Wings.

Playing career[edit]

Earl was an important member of the 1933 New York Rangers and 1938 Chicago Black Hawks Stanley Cup victories. Each year from 1935 to 1944, Seibert was selected to the first or second NHL All-Star Team (4 times to the first, 6 times to the second). A tenacious defender, Seibert was renowned for rugged physical play, famously being the only player Eddie Shore was unwilling to fight.[citation needed]

An accident during a January 28, 1937 game cast a shadow over Seibert's great career. Seibert and the legendary Howie Morenz became tangled up behind the Chicago net. Morenz fell awkwardly against the boards and broke his leg in several places. Morenz died in the hospital from complications of the injury several weeks later. Seibert was always haunted by the accident, even saying he killed Morenz.

After his NHL retirement, Seibert served as coach of Eddie Shore's Springfield Indians

He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1963, and joined his father Oliver Seibert as the first father and son combination in the Hall of Fame. In 1998, he was ranked number 72 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players.

In 2009, Seibert was ranked No. 61 on the all-time list of New York Rangers in the book 100 Ranger Greats (John Wiley & Sons).

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1929–30 Springfield Indians CAHL 40 4 1 5 84
1930–31 Springfield Indians CAHL 38 16 11 27 96
1931–32 New York Rangers NHL 44 4 6 10 88 7 1 2 3 14
1932–33 New York Rangers NHL 45 2 3 5 92 8 1 0 1 14
1933–34 New York Rangers NHL 48 13 10 23 66 2 0 0 0 4
1934–35 New York Rangers NHL 48 6 19 25 86 4 0 0 0 6
1935–36 New York Rangers NHL 15 3 3 6 6
1935–36 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 29 2 6 8 21 2 2 0 2 0
1936–37 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 45 9 6 15 46
1937–38 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 48 8 13 21 38 10 5 2 7 12
1938–39 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 48 4 11 15 57
1939–40 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 37 3 7 10 35 2 0 1 1 8
1940–41 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 44 3 17 20 52 5 0 0 0 12
1941–42 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 45 7 14 21 52 2 0 0 0 0
1942–43 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 44 5 27 32 48
1943–44 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 50 8 25 33 40 9 0 2 2 2
1944–45 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 22 7 8 15 13
1944–45 Detroit Red Wings NHL 25 5 9 14 10 14 2 1 3 4
1945–46 Indianapolis Capitals AHL 24 2 9 11 19
1945–46 Detroit Red Wings NHL 18 0 3 3 18
1946–47 Indianapolis Capitals AHL 19 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 653 89 187 276 768 65 11 8 19 76

Coaching statistics[edit]

Season  Team                  Lge Type       GP  W  L  T OTL   Pct  Result 
1946-47 Springfield Indians   AHL Head coach 64 24 29 11  0   0.461 Lost in round 1 
1946-47 Indianapolis Capitals AHL Head coach             
1947-48 Springfield Indians   AHL Head coach 68 19 42 7   0   0.331 Out of playoffs 
1948-49 Springfield Indians   AHL Head coach 68 22 37 9   0   0.390 Lost in round 1 
1949-50 Springfield Indians   AHL Head coach 70 28 34 8   0   0.457 Lost in round 1 
1950-51 Springfield Indians   AHL Head coach 70 27 37 6   0   0.429 Lost in round 1 

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Johnny Gottselig
Chicago Black Hawks captain
194042
Succeeded by
Doug Bentley