Earl of Galloway

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Coat of arms of The Earl of Galloway

Earl of Galloway is a title in the Peerage of Scotland. It was created in 1623 for Alexander Stewart, 1st Lord Garlies, with remainder to his heirs male bearing the name and arms of Stewart. He had already been created Lord Garlies in the Peerage of Scotland in 1607, with remainder to the heirs male of his body succeeding to the estates of Garlies. This branch of the Stewart family were distant relatives of the Stewart King of Scotland. Lord Galloway was succeeded by his second but eldest surviving son, the second Earl. He had already been created a Baronet, of Corsewell in the county of Wigtown, in 1627. This title is in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. His grandson, the fifth Earl (who had succeeded his elder brother, who in his turn had succeeded his father), was a politician. He was succeeded by his son, the sixth Earl. He was a Lord of Police. In 1704 Lord Galloway succeeded his kinsman Sir Archibald Stewart, 2nd Baronet, of Burray, as third Baronet of Burray (see below). On his death the titles passed to his eldest son, the seventh Earl. He was a Member of Parliament and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Wigtownshire. From 1774 to 1796 he sat in the House of Lords as a Scottish Representative Peer. In 1796 Lord Galloway was created Baron Stewart of Garlies in the Peerage of Great Britain, which gave him an automatic seat in the House of Lords. He was succeeded by his son, the eighth Earl. He was an Admiral in the Royal Navy, a Member of Parliament and Lord-Lieutenant of Kirkcudbrightshire and Wigtownshire. When he died the titles passed to his eldest son, the ninth Earl. He represented Cockermouth in the House of Commons and was Lord-Lieutenant of Kirkcudbrightshire and Wigtownshire. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the tenth Earl. He sat as Member of Parliament for Wigtownshire. On his death the titles passed to his younger brother, the eleventh Earl. He was a soldier and fought in the Crimean War and in the Indian Rebellion of 1857. He was succeeded by his only son, the twelfth Earl. He served as Lord-Lieutenant of Kirkcudbrightshire. As of 2014 the titles are held by his only son, the thirteenth Earl, who succeeded in 1978.

Several other members of the family have also gained distinction. The Hon. John Stewart, third son of the third Earl, was a Brigadier-General in the Army and also sat as Member of Parliament for Wigtownshire. The Hon. Keith Stewart, third son of the sixth Earl, was an Admiral and Member of Parliament. His son James Alexander Stewart-Mackenzie was Governor of Ceylon. His grandson was James Stewart-Mackenzie, 1st Baron Seaforth. The Hon. Montgomery Granville John Stewart, sixth son of the seventh Earl, represented Kirkcudbrightshire in the House of Commons. The Hon. James Henry Keith Stewart, eighth son of the seventh Earl, was Member of Parliament for Wigtown Burghs. The Hon. Keith Stewart (1814–1859), younger son of the eighth Earl, was an Admiral in the Royal Navy. The Hon. Alexander Stewart (1838–1896), third son of the ninth Earl, was a Major-General in the Army.

The Stewart Baronetcy, of Burray in the County of Orkney, was created in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia on 4 November 1687 for Archibald Stewart. In 1704 the title was inherited by the afromentioned sixth Earl.

The Earls of Galloway are now considered to be the senior branch of Clan Stewart,[1] although their exact descent is debated.[2]

The family seat is Cumloden House, near Cumloden, Wigtownshire. The former family seat was Galloway House, near Garlieston, Wigtownshire.

Earls of Galloway (1623)[edit]

Galloway House, the family seat in Scotland from the 1740s until 1908

The heir presumptive is the present holder's second cousin once removed Andrew Clyde Stewart (b. 1949).
The heir presumptive's heir apparent is his only son Alexander Patrick Stewart (b. 1980).

Stewart baronets, of Burray (1687)[edit]

for further succession, see above

See also[edit]

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