Earl of Listowel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Earl of Listowel (pronounced "Lis-toe-ell") is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created in 1822 for William Hare, 1st Viscount Ennismore and Listowel, who had earlier represented Cork City and Athy in the Irish House of Commons.

He had already been created Baron Ennismore, in the County of Kerry, in 1800, and Viscount Ennismore and Listowel, in 1816, also in the Peerage of Ireland. His grandson, the second Earl, represented Kerry and St Albans in the British House of Commons. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the third Earl. In 1869 he was created Baron Hare, of Convamore in the County of Cork, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, which gave him an automatic seat in the House of Lords. Lord Listowel later held minor office in the second administration of William Ewart Gladstone. His grandson, the fifth Earl, was a Labour politician and notably served as the last Secretary of State for India and Burma. As of 2014 the titles are held by the latter's eldest son, the sixth Earl, who succeeded in 1997. Lord Listowel is one of the ninety elected hereditary peers that remain in the House of Lords after the passing of the House of Lords Act 1999, and sits as a cross-bencher.

Another member of the family was the Conservative politician John Hare. He was the third son of the fourth Earl.

Listowel is a town in County Kerry, Ireland.

The family seat was Convamore House, near Ballyhooly, County Cork.

Earls of Listowel (1822)[edit]

The heir presumptive is the present holder's brother Hon. Timothy Patrick Hare (born 1966).

See also[edit]

References[edit]