East Hollywood, Los Angeles

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East Hollywood
Neighborhood of Los Angeles
East Hollywood as viewed from the Griffith Observatory
East Hollywood as viewed from the Griffith Observatory
Boundaries of East Hollywood as drawn by the Los Angeles Times
Boundaries of East Hollywood as drawn by the Los Angeles Times
East Hollywood is located in Los Angeles
East Hollywood
East Hollywood
Location within Central Los Angeles
Coordinates: 34°05′25″N 118°17′31″W / 34.090259°N 118.291927°W / 34.090259; -118.291927
Country United States
State California
County Los Angeles
City Los Angeles
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
Zip codes 90027, 90029

East Hollywood is a densely populated neighborhood of 78,000+ residents in the central region of Los Angeles, California. It is notable for being the site of Los Angeles City College, Barnsdall Park and a hospital district. There are seven public and five private schools, as well as a branch of the Los Angeles Public Library and three hospitals.

Population[edit]

The 2000 U.S. census counted 73,967 residents in the 2.38-square-mile East Hollywood neighborhood—or 31,095 people per square mile, the third-highest population density in the city. In 2008, the city estimated that the population had increased to 78,192. In 2000 the median age for residents was 31, about average for city and county neighborhoods; the percentage of residents aged 19 to 34 was among the county's highest.[1]

The neighborhood was "moderately diverse" ethnically within Los Angeles, the statistics being Latino people, 60.4%; Asians, 15.5%; whites, 17.5%; blacks, 2.4%; and others, 4.1%. El Salvador (21.2%) and Mexico (20.1%) were the most common places of birth for the 66.5% of the residents who were born abroad—which was a high percentage compared to Los Angeles as a whole.[1]

The median yearly household income in 2008 dollars was $29,927, considered low for the city, and high percentages of households earned $40,000 or less. Renters occupied 91.3% of the housing stock, and house- or apartment-owners held 8.7%. The average household size of three people was average for Los Angeles. The percentages of never-married women (33.3%) and men (42.6%) were among the county's highest. One-fifth of the 3,281 families were headed by single parents, a high rate for Los Angeles.[1]

In 2000 there were 1,509 veterans, or 2.8% of the population, a low rate compared with the rest of the city and county.[1]

Geography[edit]

East Hollywood borders Los Feliz to the north and Silver Lake, about 4 miles from Downtown Los Angeles to the east. It also borders Wilshire Center to the south and Hollywood on the west.

East Hollywood includes the smaller communities of Thai Town, Little Armenia and Melrose Hill.[1]

Nearby places[edit]

History[edit]

University of California, Southern Branch, on Vermont Avenue, 1922

In the early 20th century, the East Hollywood area was a farming village that also encompassed some of what is now Los Feliz. Parts of the neighborhood were formerly known as "Prospect Park."

In 1910 the towns of Hollywood and East Hollywood approved annexation to the City of Los Angeles in order to tap into the city water supply. In 1914, Children's Hospital was relocated from downtown LA to Vermont Avenue and Sunset Boulevard.

Cahuenga Branch, Los Angeles Public Library

In 1916 steel magnate Andrew Carnegie donated the money to construct the Cahuenga Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library on Santa Monica Boulevard.

In the early 1920s, Barnsdall Park was built. The 1920s were also a time of massive immigration into East Hollywood. Armenian immigrants established the community that is now Little Armenia. The University of California Southern Branch, needing more space, moved west at the end of the 1920s to a ranch called Westwood and became UCLA. The old Southern Branch campus then became Los Angeles Junior College, which was later renamed Los Angeles City College.

In 1930 Cedars of Lebanon Hospital was formed when Kaspare Cohn Hospital moved from East Los Angeles to a new building on Fountain Avenue and was renamed.

101 Hollywood Freeway (Called in Los Angeles "the 101") was built between 1947 and 1949.

In the summer of 1999 three Metro Red Line subway stations opened, connecting East Hollywood more efficiently to the rest of the city.

Demographics[edit]

  • These were the ten neighborhoods or cities in Los Angeles County with the highest population densities, according to the 2000 census, with the population per square mile:[2]

Education[edit]

Thirteen percent of East Hollywood residents aged 25 and older had earned a four-year degree by 2000, an average figure for the city and the county, but the percentage of residents with less than a high school diploma was high for the county.[1]

Schools within East Hollywood's borders are:[3]

Public[edit]

  • Lexington Avenue Primary Center, elementary, 4564 West Lexington Avenue
  • Kingsley Elementary School, 5200 West Virginia Avenue
  • Ramona Elementary School, 1133 North Mariposa Avenue
  • Lockwood Avenue Elementary School, 4345 Lockwood Avenue
  • Dayton Heights Elementary School, 607 North Westmoreland Avenue
  • Alexandria Avenue Elementary School, 4211 Oakwood Avenue
  • Harvard Elementary School, 330 North Harvard Boulevard

Private[edit]

  • Alex Pilibos Armenian School, K-12, 1625 North Alexandria Avenue
  • Progressive Student Learning Academy, 1518 North Alexandria Avenue
  • Canyon Oaks School, 1414 North Catalina Street
  • Immaculate Heart of Mary Elementary School, 1055 North Alexandria Avenue
  • Blind Children's Center, Inc., 4120 Marathon Street

Notable places[edit]

Vista Theatre in East Hollywood
Church of Scientology, formerly Cedars of Lebanon hospital

Notable people[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Vermont and Sunset, Children's Hospital in the background

East Hollywood is served by the Red Line subway which runs north-south along Vermont Avenue and east-west along Hollywood Boulevard.

Metro subway stations:

  • Vermont/Beverly
  • Vermont/Santa Monica
  • Vermont/Sunset
  • Hollywood/Western

Over a dozen bus lines run on the major thoroughfares, including Metro's Rapid and Local service lines. Los Angeles Department of Transportation's DASH shuttle lines serving East Hollywood, Hollywood and the Griffith Observatory also operate in the area.

The Hollywood Freeway, also called the 101 and U.S. Route 101, cuts northwest from downtown Los Angeles, with all its freeway connections, through Hollywood to the San Fernando Valley.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f [1] "East Hollywood," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  2. ^ [2] "Population Density," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  3. ^ [3] "East Hollywood Schools," Mapping L.A., Los Angeles Times
  4. ^ Aubrey Malone (1 July 2003). The Hunchback of East Hollywood: A Biography of Charles Bukowski. Headpress/Critical Vision. ISBN 978-1-900486-28-6. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 

External links[edit]



Coordinates: 34°05′25″N 118°17′31″W / 34.090259°N 118.291927°W / 34.090259; -118.291927