East Newark, New Jersey

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East Newark, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of East Newark
Map highlighting East Newark within Hudson County. Inset: Location of Hudson County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map highlighting East Newark within Hudson County. Inset: Location of Hudson County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of East Newark, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of East Newark, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°45′07″N 74°09′44″W / 40.751965°N 74.162202°W / 40.751965; -74.162202Coordinates: 40°45′07″N 74°09′44″W / 40.751965°N 74.162202°W / 40.751965; -74.162202[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hudson
Incorporated July 3, 1895
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Joseph R. Smith (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Clerk Robert B. Knapp (acting)[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.123 sq mi (0.320 km2)
 • Land 0.102 sq mi (0.265 km2)
 • Water 0.021 sq mi (0.055 km2)  17.13%
Area rank 565th of 566 in state
12th of 12 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 16 ft (5 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 2,406
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 2,441
 • Rank 474th of 566 in state
12th of 12 in county[12]
 • Density 23,532.1/sq mi (9,085.8/km2)
 • Density rank 6th of 566 in state
5th of 12 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07029[13]
Area code(s) 973[14]
FIPS code 3401719360[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885199[17][2]
Website www.boroughofeastnewark.com

East Newark is a borough in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 2,406,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 29 (+1.2%) from the 2,377 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 220 (+10.2%) from the 2,157 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] The borough is a suburb of the nearby city of Newark.

The Borough of East Newark was established on July 3, 1895, from portions of Kearny lying between the Erie Railroad's Newark Branch right of way and Harrison, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day.[19][20][21]

Geography[edit]

East Newark is located at 40°45′07″N 74°09′44″W / 40.751965°N 74.162202°W / 40.751965; -74.162202 (40.751965,-74.162202). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.123 square miles (0.320 km2), of which, 0.102 square miles (0.265 km2) of it was land and 0.021 square miles (0.055 km2) of it (17.13%) was water.[1][2]

It is bordered on the west by Newark, on the north by Kearny, and on the south and east by Harrison.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 2,500
1910 3,163 26.5%
1920 3,057 −3.4%
1930 2,686 −12.1%
1940 2,273 −15.4%
1950 2,173 −4.4%
1960 1,872 −13.9%
1970 1,922 2.7%
1980 1,923 0.1%
1990 2,157 12.2%
2000 2,377 10.2%
2010 2,406 1.2%
Est. 2012 2,441 [11] 1.5%
Population sources: 1900-1920[22]
1900-1910[23] 1910-1930[24]
1930-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,406 people, 759 households, and 569.3 families residing in the borough. The population density was 23,532.1 per square mile (9,085.8 /km2). There were 794 housing units at an average density of 7,765.8 per square mile (2,998.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 63.01% (1,516) White, 1.91% (46) Black or African American, 0.42% (10) Native American, 7.81% (188) Asian, 0.04% (1) Pacific Islander, 22.90% (551) from other races, and 3.91% (94) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 61.39% (1,477) of the population.[7]

There were 759 households of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.2% were married couples living together, 18.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.0% were non-families. 15.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.38.[7]

In the borough, 22.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 14.6% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 24.0% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31.9 years. For every 100 females there were 101.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.1 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $54,722 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,909) and the median family income was $59,423 (+/- $9,367). Males had a median income of $41,173 (+/- $3,762) versus $28,224 (+/- $4,249) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $22,242 (+/- $2,054). About 7.9% of families and 12.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.3% of those under age 18 and 16.1% of those age 65 or over.[28]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,377 people, 767 households, and 605 families residing in the borough. The population density was 23,330.0 people per square mile (9,177.6/km2). There were 799 housing units at an average density of 7,842.1 per square mile (3,085.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 67.02% White, 1.68% African American, 0.50% Native American, 2.52% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 20.99% from other races, and 7.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 47.54% of the population.[26][27]

As of the 2000 Census, 10.1% of East Newark's residents identified themselves as being of Peruvian American ancestry. This was the highest percentage of Peruvian American people in any place in the United States.[29] In the same census, 6.2% of East Newark's residents identified themselves as being of Brazilian American ancestry, which was the highest percentage of Brazilian American people in any place in the United States.[30] As of the 2000 census, 7.67% of East Newark's residents identified themselves as being of Ecuadorian ancestry, which was the highest of any municipality in New Jersey and the third highest percentage of Ecuadorian people in any place in the United States with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry.[31]

There were 767 households out of which 41.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.0% were married couples living together, 16.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.1% were non-families. 16.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.10 and the average family size was 3.40.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 25.9% under the age of 18, 10.9% from 18 to 24, 36.7% from 25 to 44, 18.8% from 45 to 64, and 7.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 103.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 104.5 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $44,352, and the median income for a family was $46,375. Males had a median income of $31,875 versus $24,231 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $16,415. About 11.3% of families and 12.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.7% of those under age 18 and 8.6% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

East Newark is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of East Newark, New Jersey is Joseph R. Smith, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2013. Members of the East Newark Borough Council are Council President Edward V. Serafin, Hans Peter Lucas, Yamara Salas, Jose Silva, Charles F. Tighe and Jeanne Zincavage.[4]

Mayor Smith is a member of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns Coalition,[32] a bi-partisan group with a stated goal of "making the public safer by getting illegal guns off the streets." The Coalition is co-chaired by Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

East Newark is located in the 8th Congressional District[33] and is part of New Jersey's 32nd state legislative district.[8][34][35] Prior to the 2010 Census, East Newark had been part of the 13th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[36]

New Jersey's Eighth Congressional District is represented by Albio Sires (D, West New York).[37] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[38][39] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[40][41]

The 32nd District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Nicholas Sacco (D, North Bergen) and in the General Assembly by Angelica M. Jimenez (D, West New York) and Vincent Prieto (D, Secaucus).[42] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[43] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[44]

Hudson County is governed by a directly-elected County Executive and by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, which serves as the county's legislative body. The County Executive is Thomas A. DeGise, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[45] As of 2013, Hudson County's nine Freeholders (with district, municipalities in district and place of residence listed in parentheses) are Doreen McAndrew DiDomenico (District 1, Bayonne and parts of Jersey City; Bayonne),[46] William O'Dea (District 2, parts of Jersey City),[47] Jeffrey Dublin (District 3, parts of Jersey City),[48] Eliu Rivera (District 4, parts of Jersey City),[49] Chairperson Anthony Romano (District 5, Hoboken and parts of Jersey City; Hoboken),[50] Tilo Rivas (District 6, Union City),[51] Vice-Chairperson Jose C. Muñoz (District 7, Guttenberg, Weehawken and West New York; West New York),[52] Chairperson Pro-Tempore Thomas Liggio (District 8, North Bergen, parts of Jersey City and Secaucus; North Bergen)[53] and Albert Cifelli (District 9, East Newark, Harrison, Kearny and parts of Secaucus; Kearny).[54][55] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Barbara A. Netchert, Sheriff Frank X. Schillari and Surrogate Donald DeLeo.[56]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 753 registered voters in East Newark, of which 469 (62.3%) were registered as Democrats, 35 (4.6%) were registered as Republicans and 249 (33.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were no voters registered to other parties.[57]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 76.0% of the vote here (414 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 22.6% (123 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (4 votes), among the 545 ballots cast by the borough's 904 registered voters, for a turnout of 60.3%.[58] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 71.2% of the vote here (337 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 26.4% (125 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (6 votes), among the 473 ballots cast by the borough's 800 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 59.1.[59]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 71.8% of the vote here (234 ballots cast), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 21.8% (71 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 4.0% (13 votes), among the 326 ballots cast by the borough's 765 registered voters, yielding a 42.6% turnout.[60]

Education[edit]

The East Newark School District serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade at East Newark Public School. As of the 2010-11 school year, the school had an enrollment of 222 students.[61]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Harrison High School in Harrison, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Harrison Public Schools.[62] Citing rising tuition costs, the district announced in 2013 that it was seeking to sever its relationship with Harrison and send its students to Kearny High School, where tuition costs for students would be substantially lower than the $14,674 per student paid to Harrison for the 2012-13 school year.[63]

Public safety[edit]

East Newark is protected by a volunteer fire department. There are approximately 34 firefighter which staff one ladder and two engines. The department also has shared use of the a mass decontamination unit with the Kearny and Harrison Fire Departments. The Fire Department has mutual aid agreements with all Hudson County departments and is also a member of The Southern Bergen County Mutual Aid Association.

Transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is available to Newark on the 30 and 76 routes.[64]

Newark Broad Street Station is the rail station closest to East Newark, with connections to New Jersey Transit's Montclair-Boonton Line and both branches of the Morris & Essex Lines. The Broad Street Stations is also served by Newark Light Rail. The closest rapid transit service is the Harrison PATH station a few blocks south of East Newark.

Interstate 280 passes through the southern portion of East Newark, but the entrances to interchange 16 lie in adjacent Harrison, and those for interchange 15B lie in Newark across the William A. Stickel Memorial Bridge over the Passaic River, which is crossed by the Clay Street Bridge.

The closest airport with scheduled passenger service is Newark Liberty International Airport, located 4.8 miles (7.7 km) away in Newark and Elizabeth. JFK Airport and LaGuardia Airport are in Queens, New York.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of East Newark include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Elected Officials, Borough of East Newark. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 142.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of East Newark, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for East Newark borough, Hudson County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 28, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 13. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for East Newark borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  10. ^ "2010 Census Populations: Hudson County", Asbury Park Press. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 10, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for East Newark, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for East Newark, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 146. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  20. ^ History, Borough of East Newark. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  21. ^ A Brief History of Harrison, Town of Harrison. Accessed April 17, 2006.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 9, 2013.
  23. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for East Newark borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 10, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for East Newark borough, Hudson County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 10, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for East Newark borough, Hudson County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  29. ^ Peruvian Communities, EPodunk. Accessed July 7, 2006.
  30. ^ Brazilian Communities, Epodunk. Accessed July 7, 2006.
  31. ^ Ecuadorian Communities, EPodunk. Accessed June 28, 2006.
  32. ^ "Mayors Against Illegal Guns: Coalition Members". 
  33. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  38. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  39. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  40. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  41. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  43. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  44. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  45. ^ Thomas A. Degise, Hudson County Executive, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  46. ^ Freeholder District 1, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  47. ^ Freeholder District 2, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  48. ^ Freeholder District 3, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ Freeholder District 4, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Freeholder District 5, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Freeholder District 6, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Freeholder District 7, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Freeholder District 8, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Freeholder District 9, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  55. ^ Freeholder Biographies, Hudson County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Directory of Elected Officials, Hudson County Clerk. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hudson, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 13, 2012.
  58. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Hudson County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 13, 2012.
  59. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Hudson County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 13, 2012.
  60. ^ 2009 Governor: Hudson County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 13, 2012.
  61. ^ Data for the East Newark Public School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 11, 2012.
  62. ^ Duger, Rose. "East Newark Harrison merging dispatch service", The Jersey Journal, December 30, 2010. Accessed March 25, 2011. "Kearny handles all health-related functions through its Board of Health, while East Newark high school children attend Harrison High School and the borough contracts with Harrison to provide street cleaning, snow removal, ambulance and library services."
  63. ^ Leir, Ron. "Where will E. Newark kids end up?", The Observer, June 19, 2013. Accessed October 9, 2013. "For much of its entire 118- year history, since it broke away from Kearny’s First Ward, the borough of East Newark (population 2,400) has maintained a single public school for kindergarten to grade 8 and has consistently sent its graduates to high school in neighboring Harrison.... For that reason, Smith said, the borough is exploring the possibility of sending its kids to Kearny High School. The tuition rate would be lower than Harrison’s and there’s room at KHS for East Newark’s kids, according to Smith."
  64. ^ Hudson County Bus/rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed June 29, 2012.
  65. ^ Davey Brown, National Soccer Hall of Fame. Accessed October 13, 2007.
  66. ^ Cornelius Augustine McGlennon, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed October 2, 2007.

External links[edit]