East Wenatchee, Washington

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East Wenatchee, Washington
City
City-ew.jpg
Official seal of East Wenatchee, Washington
Seal
Location in the state of Washington
Location in the state of Washington
Coordinates: 47°25′17″N 120°17′17″W / 47.42139°N 120.28806°W / 47.42139; -120.28806Coordinates: 47°25′17″N 120°17′17″W / 47.42139°N 120.28806°W / 47.42139; -120.28806
Country United States
State Washington
County Douglas
Incorporated March 11, 1935
Government
 • Mayor Steven C. Lacy
Area[1]
 • Total 3.81 sq mi (9.87 km2)
 • Land 3.80 sq mi (9.84 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation 712 ft (217 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 13,190
 • Estimate (2013)[3] 13,477
 • Density 3,471.1/sq mi (1,340.2/km2)
Time zone PST (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 98802
Area code 509
FIPS code 53-20155
GNIS feature ID 1519148[4]
Website City of East Wenatchee

East Wenatchee is a city in Douglas County, Washington, United States, along the northern banks of the Columbia River. The population at the 2010 census was 13,190, a 129.1% increase on the 2000 census. As of April 1, 2014, the Office of Financial Management estimates that the current population is 13,370.

On November 10, 2002, East Wenatchee was designated a principal city of the Wenatchee−East Wenatchee Metropolitan Statistical Area by the Office of Management and Budget.[5]

History[edit]

At the turn of the 20th Century irrigation projects, including the Columbia Basin Project east of the region, fostered the development of intensive agriculture in the shrub-steppe native to the region. Fruit orchards become one of the area's leading industries.

In 1908, the first highway bridge to span the Columbia River opened. The privately owned bridge carried people, horses, wagons, and automobiles; it also supported two large water pipelines along its sides. It connected Chelan County on the Wenatchee shore with Douglas County on East Wenatchee shore. The bridge opened East Wenatchee and the rest of Douglas County to apple orchard development. Still standing today, the bridge is a 1,060-foot (320 m) pin-connected steel cantilever bridge and cost $177,000 to build. It once carried Sunset Highway (State Highway 2) across the river.

The bridge was the brainchild of W. T. Clark, one of the builders of the Highline Canal, a major irrigation project to water the apple orchards in the valley. It was financed in part by James J. Hill (1838–1916), of the Great Northern Railway (which arrived in Wenatchee in 1892). In its second year of operation the canal firm that owned it decided to start charging tolls.

This prompted local leaders to hasten to the state legislature to persuade the state to purchase the bridge as part of the state highway system. The state purchased the bridge despite the state-employed consultant's opinion "that the ugliness of the structure is very apparent" (Dorpat), despite defects in the timber floor and concrete piers, and despite leaks in the waterpipes.

The structure remained in full use until 1950 when the George Sellar bridge was built. Today, it remains as a footbridge and still has the old pipeline running across it.

From its foundation in agriculture, the region's economy has diversified to include year-round tourism and a variety of other industries.

Founding[edit]

On February 28, 1935, citizens voted, 48 in favor and 46 against, to incorporate the town of East Wenatchee.[6] When the town was incorporated on March 11, 1935, the original town site was 50 acres (200,000 m2). Through subsequent annexations, the town has grown into a city. Today, East Wenatchee's boundaries encompass 3.67 square miles (9.5 km2).

Major events[edit]

On October 5, 1931, East Wenatchee became part of aviation history. Having taken off from Misawa, Japan, pilots Clyde Pangborn and Hugh Herndon Jr. safely belly-landed their Bellanca airplane Miss Veedol on a nearby airstrip known then as Fancher Field. After take off, the pilots intentionally jettisoned the landing gear to conserve fuel. This flight was the first nonstop flight across the Pacific Ocean. In honor of this pioneering flight, East Wenatchee's airport is called Pangborn Memorial Airport, and the Pangborn-Herndon Memorial Site, listed National Register of Historic Places, is nearby.

On May 27, 1987, East Wenatchee became part of archaeological history. On that date, while digging in an orchard just east of the city, farmworkers accidentally discovered a cache of 11,000-year-old Clovis points and other artifacts, left by Pleistocene hunters some 11,000 years earlier. The East Wenatchee Clovis Site, explored in two subsequent MPHarchaeological digs in 1988 and 1990, was closed to science by the landowner after protests by local Native American tribes. On January 8, 2007, East Wenatchee had a devastating wind storm with 100MPH plus winds this storm caused thousands of dollars worth of damage to homes, businesses, and city parks many people went without power for days and even weeks. The legal moratorium on new archaeological work at the site ended on June 1, 2007.[1]

Geography[edit]

East Wenatchee is located at 47°25′17″N 120°17′17″W / 47.421506°N 120.288094°W / 47.421506; -120.288094 (47.421506, -120.288094).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.81 square miles (9.87 km2), of which, 3.80 square miles (9.84 km2) is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for East Wenatchee, Washington
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 65
(18)
66
(19)
78
(26)
93
(34)
104
(40)
107
(42)
110
(43)
106
(41)
101
(38)
90
(32)
76
(24)
67
(19)
110
(43)
Average high °F (°C) 36
(2)
44
(7)
55
(13)
64
(18)
73
(23)
80
(27)
88
(31)
88
(31)
78
(26)
64
(18)
47
(8)
35
(2)
62.7
(17.2)
Average low °F (°C) 25
(−4)
28
(−2)
34
(1)
41
(5)
49
(9)
56
(13)
62
(17)
61
(16)
52
(11)
41
(5)
32
(0)
25
(−4)
42.2
(5.6)
Record low °F (°C) −17
(−27)
−18
(−28)
5
(−15)
20
(−7)
27
(−3)
39
(4)
40
(4)
41
(5)
21
(−6)
19
(−7)
0
(−18)
−19
(−28)
−19
(−28)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.33
(33.8)
1.03
(26.2)
0.61
(15.5)
0.53
(13.5)
0.69
(17.5)
0.66
(16.8)
0.34
(8.6)
0.19
(4.8)
0.30
(7.6)
0.52
(13.2)
1.38
(35.1)
1.53
(38.9)
9.11
(231.5)
Source: [8]

Other information[edit]

There are many orchards surrounding East Wenatchee. Commercial crops primarily include apples, sweet cherries and pears. Apricots, peaches, nectarines, and plums are also grown.

Wheat and other grain are also grown on farms in the outlying areas near East Wenatchee.

Nearby Entertainment and Recreation[edit]

The following activities are located in East Wenatchee or the nearby city of Wenatchee:

Culture[edit]

Community Events[edit]

Wenatchee Valley's Super Oval

Apple Blossom Festival

Wings & Wheels

On the first weekend of October, the City hosts an annual Wings and Wheels Festival to commemorate Clyde Pangborn's historic non-stop flight across the Pacific Ocean.

Classy Chassis Parade & Car Show

Sprint Boat Racing

On July 9, 2011 and August 13, 2011 Thunderswamp will host United States Sprint Boat Association (USSBA) racing. Please see www.thunderswamp.com for more information.

Projects[edit]

The following projects are taking place in East Wenatchee or nearby Wenatchee.

Current Construction Projects:

Includes Cinema, Food Court, 4 story parking garage, and mall expansion.
  • George Sellar Bridge
Includes additional lane and bypass
  • Odabashian Bridge
Includes additional bridge, road that extends to Eastmont Ave., new bridge to connect road in Fancher Heights area, and new road.
  • Walgreens- where Columbia Cinema is located
Includes longer runway, more airlines, and flights to new destinations
  • Gateway 14 Cinema - Opened at Gateway Shopping Center in Wenatchee

Wenatchee Valley lodging[edit]

  • Avenue Motel
  • Best Western (Chieftain Inn)
  • Cedars Inn
  • Coast Center Hotel
  • Comfort Inn
  • Comfort Suites
  • Econo Lodge
  • Hampton Inn and Suites (coming soon East Wenatchee)
  • Holiday Inn Express
  • Inn at the River
  • Motel 6
  • La Quinta Inn and Suites
  • Motor Inn
  • Red Lion Inn
  • Super 8 Motel
  • Spring Hill Suites by Marriott
  • Travel Lodge
  • Value Inn
  • Warm Springs Inn

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1940 268
1950 389 45.1%
1960 383 −1.5%
1970 913 138.4%
1980 1,640 79.6%
1990 2,701 64.7%
2000 5,757 113.1%
2010 13,190 129.1%
Est. 2013 13,477 2.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
2013 Estimate[3]

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city is $34,919, and the median income for a family is $41,518. Males have a median income of $37,629 versus $24,875 for females. The per capita income for the city is $17,876. 16.5% of the population and 13.4% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 28.6% are under the age of 18 and 4.2% are 65 or older.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 13,190 people, 4,997 households, and 3,517 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,471.1 inhabitants per square mile (1,340.2/km2). There were 5,275 housing units at an average density of 1,388.2 per square mile (536.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 80.1% White, 0.3% African American, 1.2% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 14.0% from other races, and 3.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 23.4% of the population.

There were 4,997 households of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 29.6% were non-families. 22.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.08.

The median age in the city was 35.2 years. 26.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.9% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 14.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

Shopping[edit]

The area's major shopping centers are Wenatchee Valley Mall and Valley North Mall.

Government and politics[edit]

Form of Government[edit]

The City of East Wenatchee is governed by a Council-Mayor. The City Council consists of seven members. The Mayor presides at City Council meetings and acts as the city's executive officer.

City Hall[edit]

City Hall is located at 271 9th St. N.E., East Wenatchee, WA 98802

Mayors of note[edit]

Steven C. Lacy (1998–present) A native of Washington, Steven C. Lacy graduated from Franklin Pierce High School in 1969. He graduated from the University of Utah School of Law in 1979 with a juris doctor degree, and settled in East Wenatchee.

Dawn Collings

Sister cities[edit]

East Wenatchee has one sister city:

Education[edit]

Public K-12 education is provided by the Eastmont School District#206.

Schools:

  • Cascade Elementary
  • Grant Elementary
  • Kenroy Elementary
  • Lee Elementary
  • Rock Island Elementary
  • Sterling Intermediate School
  • Clovis Intermediate School
  • Eastmont Junior High

Transportation[edit]

Bus[edit]

Link Transit provides public transportation throughout the Wenatchee valley including routes that connect the cities of Wenatchee and East Wenatchee with Leavenworth, Chelan, and Waterville.

Air[edit]

Horizon Air Dash 8 Q-400 landing at Pangborn Airport

The city is served by Pangborn Memorial Airport with daily flights to Seattle via Alaska Airlines.

Airline and destination[edit]

Airlines Destinations
Alaska Airlines operated by Horizon Air Seattle/Tacoma
Executive Flight Any United States Destination
Seaport Airlines Portland(OR), Yakima

There are also Executive Flight jets that fly out of Pangborn Memorial Airport.

Rail[edit]

East Wenatchee's rail access is located across the Columbia River in Wenatchee which is on the major railroad line of the Great Northern Railway (now BNSF Railway) to Seattle. It was once the eastern terminus of electric operations (1909–56) on its Cascade Tunnel route, which went all the way to Skykomish. Here, steam or diesel locomotives were changed, or coupled, to electric locomotives for this route. Today Amtrak's Empire Builder serves the city.

Also see:

Roads and highways[edit]

East Wenatchee is serviced by State Route 28, U.S. Route 97, and U.S. Route 2.

References[edit]

6. Wenatchee Valley Chamber of Commerce, www.wenatchee.org

External links[edit]