Eastman's Royal Naval Academy

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Eastman's Royal Naval Academy, originally in Southsea and later at Winchester, both in England, was a preparatory school. Between 1855 and 1923 it was known primarily as a school that prepared boys for entry to the Royal Navy. Thereafter, it was renamed Eastman's Preparatory School and continued until the 1940s. According to Jonathan Betts, it was "considered one of the top schools for boys intended for the Navy".[1]

History[edit]

The introduction in 1838 of an entrance examination for the Royal Navy, although initially an undemanding test for most, encouraged the development of specialised educational establishments, of which Eastman's Royal Naval Academy was one.[2] Despite its name, the Academy had no formal association with the Navy. It was founded by Thomas Eastman, a retired naval instructor, in 1851, and in 1854 had moved into a purpose-built building on South Parade, Southsea, England. There it catered primarily for boarders but did take some day-boys.[1] When Eastman died in 1860 he was succeeded by one of the teaching staff, George Spickernell, who a year later married Eastman's widow, and continued as headmaster until 1885.[3][dead link][dubious ]

The school was advertising itself in The Lancet in 1870, saying that it took boys from the age of nine, offered supervised bathing and boating, and had both a gymnasium and a fives court. It claimed that over 900 pupils had gone on to careers in the armed services.[4] There was a distinct nautical bent to the curriculum which, aside from teaching subjects such as Latin, Greek and English literature, included instruction in the tying of knots, carpentry and the rudiments of navigation. The proximity of the school to the sea was also exploited, especially when naval ships were present.[1]

It had relocated to Winchester by 1898. It was among those that became accredited by the Admiralty as examination centres for entrance to the Royal Navy, although the decision to single out a handful of schools in this way led to a successful protest from the Association of Preparatory School Headmasters in 1901. The Association considered the selection of a few was unfair to the remainder.[5]

In 1923 the then joint headmasters, Thomas Gilderdale and Donald Mercer, turned it into a general school as Eastman's Preparatory School.[3][dubious ]

Thomas Eastman's son, Thomas Eastman junior, taught at first at his father's school but in 1881 opened his own school at Wallington, Hampshire, also called Eastman's Royal Naval Academy. In 1886 he moved his school to Stubbington[dubious ] and in 1894 moved again to Northwood Park (former home of Philip Vanderbyl), near Winchester.

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable alumni included

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Betts, Jonathan (2006). Time Restored: The Harrison timekeepers and R.T. Gould, the man who knew (almost) everything. Oxford University Press. pp. 19–23. ISBN 978-0191620843. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  2. ^ Leinster-Mackay, Donald P. (1988). "The nineteenth-century English preparatory school: cradle and crèche of Empire?". In Mangan, J. A. 'Benefits Bestowed'?: Education and British Imperialism. Manchester University Press. pp. 65–66. ISBN 9780719025174. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Eastman's Preparatory School, Southsea[dead link]
  4. ^ "Education for Sons of Gentlemen". The Lancet. 16 July 1870. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  5. ^ Leinster-Mackay, Donald P. (1984). The Rise of the English Prep School. Taylor & Francis. pp. 65–66, 68. ISBN 978-0-905273-74-7. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  6. ^ "Agar, Augustus Willington Shelton". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/40848.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  7. ^ "Burnett, Sir Robert Lindsay". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/32189.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  8. ^ "CAMERON, Major Cecil Aylmer". Who Was Who. A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press. November 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  9. ^ "COLVIN, Sir C. Preston". Who Was Who. A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press. October 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  10. ^ "CREAGH, Charles Vandeleur’". Who Was Who. A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press. December 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  11. ^ Percival Serle (1949). "Creswell, William Rooke". Dictionary of Australian Biography. Angus & Robertson. Retrieved 2007-09-01. 
  12. ^ "DOUGLAS, Vice-Adm. Sir (Henry) Percy". Who Was Who. A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press. December 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  13. ^ "Dunbar-Nasmith, Sir Martin Eric". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/95215.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  14. ^ "Forbes, Sir Charles Morton". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/33190.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  15. ^ "French, John Denton Pinkstone". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/33272.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  16. ^ "Gould, Rupert Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/40920.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  17. ^ "BRISTOL". Who Was Who. A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press. November 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  18. ^ "Biography: Loftus William Jones VC". Royal Naval Museum Library. 2005. Retrieved 4 December 2012. 
  19. ^ "Kenworthy, Joseph Montague". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/59302.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  20. ^ "Layton, Sir Geoffrey". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/65601.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  21. ^ "Markham, Sir Albert Hastings". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/34879.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  22. ^ "May, Sir William Henry". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/34965.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  23. ^ "ROYDS, Vice-Adm. Sir Charles William Rawson". Who Was Who. A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press. December 2007. Retrieved 4 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  24. ^ "ROYDS, Admiral Sir Percy (Molyneux Rawson)". Who Was Who. A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2012 ; online edn. November 2012. Retrieved 4 December 2012.  (subscription required)
  25. ^ "Scott, Sir Percy Moreton". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/35993.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  26. ^ "Seymour, Sir Edward Hobart". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/36032.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

Further reading[edit]