Easton Corbin (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Easton Corbin
Studio album by Easton Corbin
Released March 2, 2010 (2010-03-02)
Recorded 2009
Genre Neotraditional Country
Length 35:08
Label Mercury Nashville
Producer Carson Chamberlain[1]
Easton Corbin chronology
A Little More Country Than That (EP)
(2009)
Easton Corbin
(2010)
All Over the Road
(2012)
Singles from Easton Corbin
  1. "A Little More Country Than That"
    Released: August 4, 2009
  2. "Roll with It"
    Released: April 26, 2010
  3. "I Can't Love You Back"
    Released: November 8, 2010

Easton Corbin is the self-titled debut album of American country music artist Easton Corbin. It was released on March 2, 2010, via Universal Music Group Nashville's Mercury Nashville division. The album's lead-off single, "A Little More Country Than That", was released to country radio on August 4, 2009. It debuted at #56 and became his first #1 hit for the week of April 3, 2010. In October 2010, the album's second single, "Roll with It" became Corbin's second consecutive #1 hit on the Hot Country Songs chart. The album's third single "I Can't Love You Back" released to country radio on November 8, 2010.

Singles[edit]

The first single from the album, "A Little More Country Than That," was released to Country radio in July 2009. It subsequently debuted on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart for the chart week of August 22, 2009. In March 2010, it became his first Number One song. Followup "Roll with It" has also reached number one on the same chart. The album's third single "I Can't Love You Back" released to radio on November 8, 2010.

In a news blog on CMT, Corbin talked about the first release from his debut album saying: "This song identifies who I am. It shows character and that's important where I'm from. You learn to say 'yes, ma'am' and 'no, sir' and to open the door for the ladies."[2]

Reception[edit]

Commercial[edit]

Easton Corbin debuted at #4 on the U.S. Billboard Top Country Albums and #10 on the U.S. Billboard 200, selling 43,000 copies in its first week of release.[3] As of the chart dated May 21, 2011, the album has sold 371,167 copies in the US.[4]

Critical[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3.5/5 stars[5]
Billboard (favorable)[6]
The Boston Globe (positive)[7]
Country Weekly 3.5/5 stars[8]
Entertainment Weekly B+[9]
Slant Magazine 2.5/5 stars[10]
The 9513 4/5 stars[11]

Upon its release, Easton Corbin received generally positive reviews from most music critics.[12] At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 75, based on 5 reviews, which indicates "generally favorable reviews".[12]

Karlie Justus of The 9513 gave the album four out of five stars, citing the neotraditionalist country production choices, that make the album sound modern, fresh, and mainstream-friendly. She also praises the album's producer, Carson Chamberlain, for giving the album an "easy, natural feel."[11] Stuart Munro with The Boston Globe called it a "real country" record, saying it "challenges those who claim there’s no longer any “real country’’ to be found in modern mainstream country music" and positively compared Corbin to George Strait and Alan Jackson.[7]

Country Weekly reviewer Jessica Phillips also commended Chamberlain's production and compared Corbin's voice to George Strait and Keith Whitley, saying that Corbin sounded "authentic and confident." She gave the album three-and-a-half stars out of five.[8] Allmusic critic Todd Sterling also compared Corbin's voice to Strait's and praised the neotraditionalist country sound of the album, giving it three-and-a-half stars out of five.[5] In her review for Entertainment Weekly, critic Whitney Pastorek also noted the similarities between Corbin's voice and Strait's, and she suggested that the album would make a listener "remember why you fell in love with country music in the first place" and gave the album a "B+" grade.[9] Slant Magazine critic Jonathan Keefe was less enthusiastic, praising Corbin both for his songwriting and his ambition in emulating a "genre legend" like Strait, but commenting that the material on the album was generally weak and rating the album with two-and-a-half stars out of five.[10]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "Roll with It"   Tony Lane, David Lee, Johnny Park 3:27
2. "A Little More Country Than That"   Rory Lee Feek, Don Poythress, Wynn Varble 2:52
3. "This Far from Memphis"   Easton Corbin, Carson Chamberlain, Mark D. Sanders 3:17
4. "The Way Love Looks"   Corbin, Chamberlain, Sanders 2:41
5. "Someday When I'm Old"   Chris Lindsey, Aimee Mayo, Troy Verges 3:22
6. "Don't Ask Me About a Woman"   Tom Botkin, Kevin Denney, Alex Dooley 3:36
7. "I Can't Love You Back"   Chamerlain, Jeff Hyde, Clint Daniels 4:05
8. "A Lot to Learn About Livin'"   Liz Hengber, Sonny LeMaire, Clay Mills 3:46
9. "Let Alone You"   Chamberlain, Garry Harison, Sonny Tillis 3:14
10. "That'll Make You Wanna Drink"   Corbin, Chamberlain, Jimmy Yeary 3:26
11. "Leavin' a Lonely Town"   Corbin, Chamberlain, Sanders 3:22

Personnel[edit]

Charts[edit]

Album[edit]

Chart (2010) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard 200 10[13]
U.S. Billboard Top Country Albums 4[13]

End of year charts[edit]

Chart (2010) Peak
position
US Billboard 200 125[14]
US Billboard Top Country Albums 22[15]

Singles[edit]

Year Single Peak chart positions
US Country US CAN
2009 "A Little More Country Than That"[16] 1 42 66
2010 "Roll with It"[17] 1 55 88
"I Can't Love You Back"[18] 14 76
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

References[edit]

  1. ^ Leggett, Steve. "Easton Corbin biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  2. ^ "CMT: News: Easton Corbin releasing self-titled debut album on March 2". CMT News. 2010-01-14. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  3. ^ Caulfield, Keith (2010-03-10). "Lady Antebellum Returns to No. 1 On Billboard 200". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  4. ^ "Colt Ford Debuts At #3 On Album Chart This Week". Roughstock. 2011-05-11. Retrieved 2011-05-11. 
  5. ^ a b Sterling, Todd. "Easton Corbin - Easton Corbin". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  6. ^ Price, Deborah Evans (2010-02-26). "Easton Corbin, "Easton Corbin"". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  7. ^ a b Munro, Stuart (2010-03-01). "Easton Corbin, ‘Easton Corbin’". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  8. ^ a b Phillips, Jessica (2010-03-15). "Easton Corbin : Easton Corbin - Country Weekly Magazine". Country Weekly. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  9. ^ a b Pastorek, Whitney (2010-03-02). "Extended Play, Country Edition: Danny Gokey, Blake Shelton, Easton Corbin". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  10. ^ a b Keefe, Jonathan (2010-02-26). "Easton Corbin: Easton Corbin". Slant Magazine. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  11. ^ a b Justus, Karlie (2010-02-19). "Album Review: Easton Corbin – Easton Corbin". The 9513. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  12. ^ a b "Easton Corbin Reviews, Ratings, Credits, and More at Metacritic". Metacritic. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  13. ^ a b "Chart listing for Easton Corbin". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  14. ^ "Best of 2010 - Billboard Top 200". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Retrieved 2010-12-31. 
  15. ^ "Best of 2010 - Top Country Albums". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Retrieved 2010-12-31. 
  16. ^ "A Little More Country Than That - Easton Corbin". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  17. ^ "Roll with It - Eaton Corbin". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-10-30. 
  18. ^ "I Can't Love You Back - Eaton Corbin". Billboard. Retrieved 2011-05-25.