Eastry

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Eastry
St Mary the Virgin, Eastry.jpg
Church of St Mary the Virgin, Eastry
Eastry is located in Kent
Eastry
Eastry
 Eastry shown within Kent
Population 2,168 [1] (Parish)
OS grid reference TR332458
District Dover
Shire county Kent
Region South East
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town SANDWICH
Postcode district CT13
Dialling code 01304
Police Kent
Fire Kent
Ambulance South East Coast
EU Parliament South East England
UK Parliament Dover
List of places
UK
England
Kent

Coordinates: 51°14′43″N 1°18′12″E / 51.2452°N 1.3034°E / 51.2452; 1.3034

Eastry is a civil parish and remote, yet historically significant village in Kent, England, around four kilometres south-west of Sandwich. It was voted "Kent Village of the Year 2005".

The name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon Éast-rige, meaning "eastern province" (c.f. Suth-rige "southern province"), also recorded as Éastregé, from éasterra gé (lit. "more easterly area").[2]

Historical legends[edit]

It was here that a royal palace of the Saxon kings of Kent stood. One of Kent's oldest legends concerns King Ecgberht of Kent and the murder of his cousins within the palace walls. According to the legend, the royal residence was passed to the priory of Christchurch in Canterbury as penance for the crime. The site of this ancient palace is believed to now be occupied by Eastry Court, close besides the church.

Another traditional story is that Thomas Becket hid in Eastry's caves whilst escaping from England in 1164. Those same caves are associated with other stories that may or may not be true. Locally however it is said these tunnels were made in the first world war.

Parish church[edit]

Eastry's Grade I listed[3] Anglican church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. Within the church is a brass standard bushel measure given in 1792.

East Kent Light Railway[edit]

The East Kent Light Railway was opened to freight traffic in 1911 and passenger traffic in 1916. Its purpose was to serve the new coal mines which were being opened up in the area. Among the stations opened were 'Eastry' and 'Eastry South'. It was one of Colonel Stephens' lines, but was nationalized in 1948 becoming part of British Railways, Southern Region. Both the colliery and the line failed and the section north of Eythorne completely closed by 1951.

The village is also on the Miner's Way Trail. The trail links up the coalfield parishes of East Kent.[4]

Mills[edit]

Eastry windmill

Eastry has had a number of windmills over the centuries. There were four mills marked on the 1819 - 1843 Ordnance Survey map, one of which, the Upper Mill, has been converted into a house.

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Statistics Census 2001
  2. ^ Hasted, Edward (1800). "Parishes". The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 10 (Institute of Historical Research) 10: 98–121. Retrieved 3 December 2013. 
  3. ^ British Listed Buildings retrieved 20 July 2013
  4. ^ "The History of the Coalfield Parishes". www.dover.gov.uk. Retrieved 20 November 2013. 

External links[edit]