Echinocereus triglochidiatus

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Echinocereus triglochidiatus
Echinocereus triglochidiatusUGA0807034.jpg
Conservation status

Secure (NatureServe)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Pachycereeae
Genus: Echinocereus
Species: E. triglochidiatus
Binomial name
Echinocereus triglochidiatus
Engelm.

Echinocereus triglochidiatus is a species of hedgehog cactus known by several common names, including Kingcup cactus, Claretcup, and Mojave mound cactus. This cactus is native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, where it is a resident of varied habitats from low desert to rocky slopes, scrub, and mountain woodland. It is most abundant in shady areas.

There are a number of varieties of this highly variable cactus species, but not all are universally recognized. In general it is a mounding cactus, forming bulbous piles of few to hundreds of spherical to cylindrical stems. It is densely spiny and somewhat woolly. The showy flower is a funnel shaped bloom up to 8 or 9 centimeters wide and bright scarlet red to orange-red tepals. There is a thick nectar chamber and many thready pink stamens at the center of the corolla. The flowers are pollinated by hummingbirds.

One variety, var. arizonicus, is federally listed as an endangered species in the United States.[1] It is limited to the intersection of Arizona and New Mexico in the United States with Mexico.[2] This variety is sometimes included within Echinocereus coccineus.[3]

The conservation status of several subspecies differs from that displayed. Examples include:

  • Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. arizonicus Arizona hedgehog cactus (Endangered)
  • Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. melanacanthus Black-Spine claret-cup hedgehog (Salvage restricted)
  • Echinocereus triglochidiatus var. neomexicanus Mexican claret-cup hedgehog (Salvage restricted)

Etymology[edit]

Presumably the specific epithet comes from tri- and glochidium, with a meaning of something like having three arrow points.

References[edit]

External links[edit]