Ecuador national football team

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Ecuador
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) La Tri (Tri-color)
Association Federación Ecuatoriana de Fútbol (FEF)
Confederation CONMEBOL (South America)
Head coach Reinaldo Rueda
Captain Antonio Valencia
Most caps Iván Hurtado (167)
Top scorer Agustín Delgado (31)
Home stadium Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa, Quito
FIFA code ECU
FIFA ranking 28 Decrease 5
Highest FIFA ranking 10 (April 2013)
Lowest FIFA ranking 76 (June 1995)
Elo ranking 14 Increase 2
Highest Elo ranking 11 (27 March 2013)
Lowest Elo ranking 111 (December 1959)
First colours
Second colours
First international
 Bolivia 1–1 Ecuador Ecuador
(Bogotá, Colombia; August 8, 1938)
Biggest win
Ecuador Ecuador 6–0 Peru 
(Quito, Ecuador; June 22, 1975)
Biggest defeat
 Argentina 12–0 Ecuador Ecuador
(Montevideo, Uruguay; January 22, 1942)
World Cup
Appearances 3 (First in 2002)
Best result Round of 16 (2006)
Copa América
Appearances 24 (First in 1939)
Best result Fourth place (1959, 1993)
CONCACAF Gold Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 2002)
Best result Group Stage (2002)

The Ecuadorian national football team represents Ecuador in international football competitions and is controlled by the Ecuadorian Football Federation(Federación Ecuatoriana de Fútbol). They play official home matches at Estadio Olímpico Atahualpa in Quito.

Ecuador has qualified for three FIFA World Cups in 2002, 2006 and 2014. Their best performance came in 2006 when they advanced to the Round of 16, eventually eliminated by England. They are one of three countries in South America to not win the Copa América (the others being Chile and Venezuela). Their best performance in the continental tournament was fourth in 1959 and 1993, both times on home soil.

History[edit]

From a historical viewpoint, Ecuador have been one of the more struggling footballing nations in South America. Despite their past irregularities, however, they have never lacked quality. Ecuador is very experienced in football matches especially that 3-2 win against Portugal.

Discarding an invitation to participate in the inaugural 1930 FIFA World Cup held in Uruguay, their first participation in a World Cup qualifying campaign was in the 1962 campaign, eventually being well beaten by Argentina over two games. However, the 1966 qualifying campaign pitted the side, regarded as one of the finest teams Ecuador has ever produced, against 1962 hosts and third-place finishers Chile and a weakened Colombia side. Ecuador, featuring stars such as Washington Muñoz, Alberto Spencer, Carlos Alberto Raffo, Enrique Raymondi and Jorge Bolaños, forced a play-off in Peru before being eliminated by Chile. Other talented players to have represented Ecuador include José Villafuerte in the 1970s and 1980s.

The 1998 World Cup qualifiers saw the format for qualifying in CONMEBOL changed to a league home-and-away system. This difference made a huge impact on Ecuador's performance as they clinched several important home wins during the campaign. At the end, they achieved a very respectable 6th place finish, just under Peru and Chile (which qualified by goal differential). The campaign also marked the emergence of several players, such as Agustín Delgado, Álex Aguinaga, Iván Hurtado, Ulises de la Cruz and Iván Kaviedes, who would set the stage for Ecuador's achievements in the next decade.

This remained the closest they had come to appearing in a finals until the qualification tournament for the 2002 FIFA World Cup in South Korea and Japan. Led by Colombian born manager Hernán Darío Gómez, they finished second to Argentina, and one point ahead of Brazil who went on to win the World Cup. Agustín Delgado, with 9 goals, finished joint top scorer in qualifying with Hernán Crespo of Argentina. They were drawn into Group G with Italy, Mexico and Croatia. Although they were knocked out at the group stage, they achieved a 1–0 victory over Croatia, who had come third at the previous edition of the World Cup.

A disappointing showing at the 2004 Copa América in Peru led to the resignation of Gómez, who was replaced by another Colombian, Luis Fernando Suárez. He led them successfully through the latter stages of the qualification process for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, finishing third to make the finals. In Germany, they were drawn into Group A with the hosts, Poland, and Costa Rica. Wins over Poland and Costa Rica earned La Tri qualification to the knockout stages for the first time.

Another disappointing showing at yet another Copa América in 2007 and three successive defeats in the beginning of the 2010 World Cup qualifying campaign led to the end of Suarez's time in the national team. He was replaced in 2008 for Sixto Vizuete, who had previously gained recognition for winning the 2007 Pan American Games with the U-18s. Vizuete became one of the few Ecuadorians to coach the U-23 national team, and senior team, but Ecuador finished the qualifying campaign for the 2010 FIFA World Cup in 6th place, sadly being eliminated from the finals for the first time since 1998. They managed to turn it around in the 2014 World Cup qualifying campaign where they finished in the top 4, enough to record a third World Cup appearance. On Friday, December 6, 2013 they were drawn into a balanced group compromising of top seeds, Switzerland, former champions France, and minnows Honduras.

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA World Cup record[edit]

Year Round Pos Pld W D L GF GA
Uruguay 1930 to France 1938 Did not enter
Brazil 1950 Withdrew
Switzerland 1954 to Sweden 1958 Did not enter
Chile 1962 to France 1998 Did not qualify
South KoreaJapan 2002 Group Stage 24 3 1 0 2 2 4
Germany 2006 Round of 16 12 4 2 0 2 5 4
South Africa 2010 Did not qualify
Brazil 2014 Qualified
Total 2/19 12 7 3 0 4 7 8

Copa América record[edit]

Pan American Games record[edit]

Ecuador national football team
Medal record
U-20 Panamerican Games
Gold 2007 Brazil Panamerican Games

Minor tournaments[edit]

Ecuador national football team
Medal record
Tournament L'Alcudia
Gold 2010 L'Alcudia Tournament

Bolivarian Games[edit]

World Cup Qualification[edit]

Ecuador has qualified for the 2014 FIFA World Cup. The country's national football team was able to qualify to the world cup on Brazilian soil, on October 15, 2013. Ecuador secured its spot by placing fourth with 25 points on a better goal difference then Uruguay. Its decisive match was played a fixed date earlier (October 11th) when they played direct rivals Uruguay, on who would achieve direct qualification, and who would seek the playoffs. On home soil, the team obtained a winning 1-0, which would make Uruguay's next game extremely difficult because they had to win by a margin of 5-0 against always difficult Argentina.


Team
Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
 Argentina 16 9 5 2 35 15 +20 32
 Colombia 16 9 3 4 27 13 +14 30
 Chile 16 9 1 6 29 25 +4 28
 Ecuador 16 7 4 5 20 16 +4 25
 Uruguay 16 7 4 5 25 25 0 25
 Venezuela 16 5 5 6 14 20 −6 20
 Peru 16 4 3 9 17 26 −9 15
 Bolivia 16 2 6 8 17 30 −13 12
 Paraguay 16 3 3 10 17 31 −14 12
  Argentina Bolivia Chile Colombia Ecuador Paraguay Peru Uruguay Venezuela
Argentina  1–1 4–1 0–0 4–0 3–1 3–1 3–0 3–0
Bolivia  1–1 0–2 1–2 1–1 3–1 1–1 4–1 1–1
Chile  1–2 3–1 1–3 2–1 2–0 4–2 2–0 3–0
Colombia  1–2 5–0 3–3 1–0 2–0 2–0 4–0 1–1
Ecuador  1–1 1–0 3–1 1–0 4–1 2–0 1–0 2–0
Paraguay  2–5 4–0 1–2 1–2 2–1 1–0 1–1 0–2
Peru  1–1 1–1 1–0 0–1 1–0 2–0 1–2 2–1
Uruguay  3–2 4–2 4–0 2–0 1–1 1–1 4–2 1–1
Venezuela  1–0 1–0 0–2 1–0 1–1 1–1 3–2 0–1


Players[edit]

Last game:  Australia 3  Ecuador 4 (The Den, London, England) March 5th 2014

Next game:  Netherlands Vs.  Ecuador (Amsterdam Arena, Amsterdam, Netherlands) May 17th 2014

Current squad[edit]

The following 20 players were named for the Friendly match against Australia in South Bermondsey, England on March 5, 2014.

Caps and goals updated as of March 5, 2014 after match against Australia.

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Máximo Banguera (1985-12-16) December 16, 1985 (age 28) 22 0 Ecuador Barcelona
1GK Alexander Domínguez (1987-06-05) June 5, 1987 (age 26) 18 0 Ecuador LDU Quito
1GK Adrián Bone (1988-09-08) September 8, 1988 (age 25) 3 0 Ecuador El Nacional
2DF Walter Ayoví (1979-08-11) August 11, 1979 (age 34) 88 8 Mexico Pachuca
2DF Jorge Guagua (1981-09-28) September 28, 1981 (age 32) 56 2 Ecuador Emelec
2DF Juan Carlos Paredes (1987-07-08) July 8, 1987 (age 26) 35 0 Ecuador Barcelona
2DF Frickson Erazo (1988-05-05) May 5, 1988 (age 25) 34 1 Brazil Flamengo
2DF Gabriel Achilier (1985-03-24) March 24, 1985 (age 29) 20 0 Ecuador Emelec
2DF Óscar Bagüí (1982-12-10) December 10, 1982 (age 31) 20 0 Ecuador Emelec
2DF Cristian Ramírez (1994-08-15) August 15, 1994 (age 19) 2 0 Germany Fortuna Düsseldorf
3MF Édison Méndez (1979-03-15) March 15, 1979 (age 35) 108 18 Colombia Santa Fe
3MF Segundo Castillo (1982-05-15) May 15, 1982 (age 31) 79 9 Saudi Arabia Al-Hilal
3MF Antonio Valencia (Captain) (1985-08-04) August 4, 1985 (age 28) 68 8 England Manchester United
3MF Luis Saritama (1983-10-20) October 20, 1983 (age 30) 48 0 Ecuador Barcelona
3MF Christian Noboa (1985-04-09) April 9, 1985 (age 29) 40 2 Russia Dynamo Moscow
3MF Jefferson Montero (1989-09-01) September 1, 1989 (age 24) 37 7 Mexico Morelia
3MF Enner Valencia (1989-04-11) April 11, 1989 (age 25) 8 2 Mexico Pachuca
3MF Fidel Martínez (1990-02-15) February 15, 1990 (age 24) 6 2 Mexico Tijuana
3MF Fernando Gaibor (1991-10-08) October 8, 1991 (age 22) 2 0 Ecuador Emelec
4FW Felipe Caicedo (1988-09-05) September 5, 1988 (age 25) 47 15 United Arab Emirates Al-Jazira

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have been called up during the last twelve months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Alexis Lemos (1989-12-15) December 15, 1989 (age 24) 0 0 Ecuador Deportivo Quito v.  Argentina; June 11, 2013
DF Jayro Campos (1984-07-19) July 19, 1984 (age 29) 20 0 Ecuador Barcelona v.  Honduras; November 19, 2013
DF Luis Checa (1983-12-21) December 21, 1983 (age 30) 8 0 Ecuador Barcelona v.  Chile; October 15, 2013
DF Gabriel Corozo (1995-01-05) January 5, 1995 (age 19) 0 0 Ecuador LDU Quito v.  Chile; October 15, 2013
DF Elvis Bone (1983-04-07) April 7, 1983 (age 31) 1 0 Ecuador Deportivo Cuenca v.  Argentina; June 11, 2013
MF Renato Ibarra (1991-01-20) January 20, 1991 (age 23) 17 0 Netherlands Vitesse v.  Australia; March 5, 2014
MF João Rojas (1989-06-14) June 14, 1989 (age 24) 27 2 Mexico Cruz Azul v.  Honduras; November 19, 2013
MF Álex Bolaños (1986-01-22) January 22, 1986 (age 28) 8 0 Ecuador Barcelona v.  Chile; October 15, 2013
MF Junior Sornoza (1994-01-28) January 28, 1994 (age 20) 0 0 Ecuador Independiente v.  Chile; October 15, 2013
MF Michael Arroyo (1987-04-23) April 23, 1987 (age 26) 20 2 Mexico Atlante v.  Bolivia; September 10, 2013
MF Joffre Guerrón (1985-04-28) April 28, 1985 (age 28) 18 0 China Beijing Guoan v.  Bolivia; September 10, 2013
MF Pedro Quiñónez (1986-03-04) March 4, 1986 (age 28) 9 0 Ecuador Emelec v.  Bolivia; September 10, 2013
MF Pedro Larrea (1986-05-21) May 21, 1986 (age 27) 0 0 Ecuador LDU Loja v.  Bolivia; September 10, 2013
MF Dennys Quiñónez (1992-03-12) March 12, 1992 (age 22) 3 0 Ecuador Deportivo Quito v.  Spain; August 14, 2013
MF Alex Colón (1986-11-17) November 17, 1986 (age 27) 0 0 Mexico Pachuca v.  Argentina; June 11, 2013
FW Jaime Ayoví (1988-02-21) February 21, 1988 (age 26) 28 9 Mexico Tijuana v.  Honduras; November 19, 2013
FW Narciso Mina (1982-11-25) November 25, 1982 (age 31) 11 1 Mexico Atlante v.  Bolivia; September 10, 2013
FW Marlon de Jesús (1991-09-04) September 4, 1991 (age 22) 5 0 Mexico Monterrey v.  Spain; August 14, 2013
FW Juan Anangonó (1989-04-13) April 13, 1989 (age 25) 2 0 United States Chicago Fire v.  Argentina; June 11, 2013

Player records[edit]

Bold indicates player is still active in National team.

Players with 50 or more caps[edit]

Previous squads[edit]

Retired numbers[edit]

Following the death of Christian Benítez, the Ecuadorian Football Federation has retired his jersey number 11 from the national team. According to the Federation's president, Luis Chiriboga, to honor Christian Benítez the number would no longer be used by any other team player.[5]

Historic Kits[edit]

The standard Ecuadorian uniform maintains the colours of the national flag, being the tricolor, yellow, blue, and red.[6] The alternate colours of the uniform are White, and Blue, this being based on a flag once flown by Ecuador based on the flag of Guayas. Its crest has remained the same since its inception in 1927, with variations placing Ecuador on top of the crest. [7]

1941–1945
1945–1947
1949–1953
1953-1955
1955-1966
1966-1973[8]
1973-1983
1983-1985
1985-1992
1992-1995
1996-1999
1999-2002
2002
2003-2006
2006
2007-2011
2011-2014


2014

Kit Sponsor[edit]

Uniform provider
Date Sponsor
1991-1992 Germany Puma
1993-1995 United Kingdom Reebok
1995-present Ecuador Marathon

Managers[edit]

Manager Career GP W D L
Enrique Lamas August 8, 1938 – August 22, 1938 5 1 1 3
Ramón Unamuno January 15, 1939 – February 12, 1939 4 0 0 4
Juan Parodi February 2, 1941 – February 5, 1942 10 0 0 10
Rodolfo Orlandini January 14, 1945 – February 21, 1945 6 0 1 5
Ramón Unamuno November 30, 1947 – December 29, 1947 7 0 3 4
José Planas April 3, 1949 – May 3, 1949 7 1 0 6
Gregorio Esperón February 28, 1953 – March 23, 1953 6 0 2 4
José María Díaz Granados February 27, 1955 – March 23, 1955 5 0 0 5
Eduardo Spandre March 7, 1957 – April 1, 1957 6 0 1 5
Juan López December 6, 1959 – December 17, 1960 7 1 1 5
Fausto Montalván March 10, 1963 – March 31, 1963 6 1 2 3
José María Rodríguez July 20, 1965 – October 12, 1965 5 2 1 2
Fausto Montalván December 21, 1966 – December 28, 1966 2 0 1 1
José Gomes Nogueira June 22, 1969 – August 3, 1969 5 1 1 3
Ernesto Guerra April 29, 1970 – May 24, 1970 2 0 0 2
Jorge Lazo June 11, 1972 – June 21, 1972 4 0 1 3
Roberto Resquín February 18, 1973 – July 8, 1973 10 1 6 3
Roque Máspoli June 22, 1975 – March 20, 1977 19 5 4 10
Héctor Morales June 13, 1979 – September 16, 1979 8 3 1 4
Otto Vieira January 27, 1981 – February 14, 1981 2 0 0 2
Juan Eduardo Hohberg May 17, 1981 – June 14, 1981 4 1 1 2
Ernesto Guerra July 26, 1983 – September 7, 1983 6 0 4 2
Antoninho Ferreira November 30, 1984 – March 31, 1985 15 3 5 7
Luis Grimaldi November 18, 1986 – July 4, 1987 13 2 5 6
Dušan Drašković June 2, 1988 – September 19, 1993 56 17 17 22
Carlos Torres Garcés May 25, 1994 – June 5, 1994 2 2 0 0
Carlos Ron August 17, 1994 – September 21, 1994 2 0 1 1
Francisco Maturana May 24, 1995 – June 8, 1997 34 16 6 12
Luis Fernando Suárez June 11, 1997 – June 22, 1997 4 2 2 0
Francisco Maturana July 6, 1997 – November 16, 1997 7 3 1 3
Polo Carrera October 14, 1998 1 0 0 1
Carlos Sevilla January 28, 1999 – July 7, 1999 15 3 6 6
Hernán Darío Gómez October 12, 1999 – July 23, 2004 66 24 18 24
Luis Fernando Suárez September 4, 2004 – November 17, 2007 51 17 9 25
Sixto Vizuete November 21, 2007 – July 11, 2010 25 9 7 9
Reinaldo Rueda September 4, 2010–present 37 16 11 10

Notes and references[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]