Eczema herpeticum

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Eczema herpeticum
Classification and external resources
ICD-10 B00.0
ICD-9 054.0
DiseasesDB 31391
eMedicine article/1132622
MeSH D007617

Eczema herpeticum is a rare but severe disseminated infection that generally occurs at sites of skin damage produced by, for example, atopic dermatitis, burns, long term usage of topical steroids or eczema.[1] It is also known as Kaposi varicelliform eruption, Pustulosis varioliformis acute and Kaposi-Juliusberg dermatitis.

Some sources reserve the term "eczema herpeticum" when the cause is due to human herpes simplex virus,[2] and the term "Kaposi varicelliform eruption" to describe the general presentation without specifying the virus.[3]

This condition is most commonly caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or 2, but may also be caused by coxsackievirus A16, or vaccinia virus.[1] It appears as numerous umbilicated vescicles superimposed on healing atopic dermatitis. it is often accompanied by fever and lymphadenopathy. Eczema herpeticum can be life-threatening in babies.

History[edit]

Eczema herpeticum was first described by Moriz Kaposi in 1887. Fritz Juliusberg coined the term Pustulosis varioliformis acute in 1898.

Presentation[edit]

This infection affects multiple organs, including the eyes, brain, lung, and liver, and can be fatal.

Treatment[edit]

It can be treated with systemic antiviral drugs, such as acyclovir or valaciclovir.[4] Foscarnet may also be used for immunocompromised host with Herpes simplex and acyclovir-resistant Herpes simplex.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Olson J, Robles DT, Kirby P, Colven R (2008). "Kaposi varicelliform eruption (eczema herpeticum)". Dermatology online journal 14 (2): 18. PMID 18700121. 
  2. ^ "eczema herpeticum" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
  3. ^ "Kaposi varicelliform eruption" at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
  4. ^ Brook I, Frazier EH, Yeager JK (April 1998). "Microbiology of infected eczema herpeticum". Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology 38 (4): 627–9. doi:10.1016/S0190-9622(98)70130-6. PMID 9555806. 

External links[edit]