Edgefield, South Carolina

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Edgefield, South Carolina
Town
Motto: "Home of Ten Governors"
Location of Edgefield, South Carolina
Location of Edgefield, South Carolina
Coordinates: 33°47′N 81°56′W / 33.783°N 81.933°W / 33.783; -81.933Coordinates: 33°47′N 81°56′W / 33.783°N 81.933°W / 33.783; -81.933
Country United States
State South Carolina
County Edgefield
Area
 • Total 4.1 sq mi (10.7 km2)
 • Land 4.1 sq mi (10.5 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.2 km2)
Elevation 531 ft (162 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 4,449
 • Density 1,094.3/sq mi (422.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 29824
Area code(s) 803
FIPS code 45-22795[1]
GNIS feature ID 1247634[2]
Website www.edgefieldsc.net

Edgefield is a town in Edgefield County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 4,750 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Edgefield County.[3]

Edgefield is part of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

Geography[edit]

Edgefield is located at 33°47′N 81°56′W / 33.783°N 81.933°W / 33.783; -81.933 (33.7868, -81.9278).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 4.2 square miles (11 km2), of which 4.1 square miles (11 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) (1.93%) is water.

History[edit]

Edgefield is situated along the Horse Creek Valley, which is rich in clay deposits. This was the source for bricks made in the town and, later, alkaline-glazed stoneware pottery. The slave owners of Edgefield, such as Benjamin Franklin Landrum and Thomas J. Davies, hired out their slaves as workers to make pottery at the kilns. Some potters, such as Dave the Slave, signed their work, and became more widely known as popular artists a century after their deaths.[5] Unsigned pottery from kilns in Pottersville and Edgefield today are known by the names of their owners; the artists were largely undocumented.

Edgefield suffered a devastating fire in late October 1881 with damages of $110,000.[6]

The upland area also was developed for cotton plantations, after invention of the cotton gin made growing short-staple cotton profitable. Several mansions and a plantation have been preserved from this era: Blocker House, Cedar Grove, Darby Plantation, and together with the Edgefield Historic District, Horn Creek Baptist Church, and Pottersville, are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[7]

On February 14, 2014, at 10:23pm, Edgefield had a 4.1 magnitude earthquake, followed by an aftershock of 3.2 on February 16, 2014, at 3:23pm.[8]

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 4,449 people, 1,080 households, and 697 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,094.3 people per square mile (422.1/km²). There were 1,229 housing units at an average density of 302.3 per square mile (116.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 38.82% White, 59.92% African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.18% from other races, and 0.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.47% of the population.

There were 1,080 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.8% were married couples living together, 23.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 32.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.96.

In the town the population was spread out with 14.1% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 44.1% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 195.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 221.4 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $24,977, and the median income for a family was $30,721. Males had a median income of $25,478 versus $23,462 for females. The per capita income for the town was $8,125. About 20.7% of families and 25.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.1% of those under age 18 and 23.2% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

The Federal Bureau of Prisons Federal Correctional Institution, Edgefield is in Edgefield County; it is partially within the city limits of Edgefield, and partially in an unincorporated area.[9][10]

Notable natives and residents[edit]

  • Edward G. Walker was born near Edgefield at Chappelle's Landing. He moved to Boston, Massachusetts in 1870 and later became an attorney, among the first few black men to pass the bar in the state. He was elected to two terms as a state legislator, one of the first two black men to be elected to state office in Massachusetts.
  • Strom Thurmond was born in Edgefield. He served as a Democrat, States Rights Democratic Party and Republican in the US Senate, serving for 48 years. He left office as the only member of either house of Congress to reach the age of 100 while still in office, and as the oldest-serving and longest-serving senator in U.S. history (at that time).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ "Dave the Slave", Edgefield website
  6. ^ "An Historic Town in Ruins". Charleston News & Courier. Nov 1, 1881. p. 1. Retrieved Dec 3, 2012. 
  7. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  8. ^ Associated Press. "Minor Earthquake Shakes Homes in Georgia & South Carolina". foxnews.com. Retrieved 15 February 2014. 
  9. ^ "FCI Edgefield Contact Information." Federal Bureau of Prisons. Retrieved on July 27, 2010.
  10. ^ "Edgefield town, South Carolina." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on July 27, 2010.

External links[edit]