Edmund Chilmead

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Edmund Chilmead (1610 – 19 February 1654) was an English writer and translator, who produced both scholarly works and hack-writing. He is also known as a musician.[1]

Life[edit]

He was born in 1610 at Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire. [2] He studied at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he graduated M.A. in 1631. He became a chaplain (canon) of Christ Church, Oxford, in 1632, from where he was ejected in 1648.

Chilmead died on 19 February 1653-4 in London, and was buried in the churchyard of St Botolph's Aldersgate. [2]

Works[edit]

He produced the editio princeps of the Chronographia of Malalas.[3] He translated:

  • Robert Hues's Tractatus de globis (A Learned Treatise of Globes, 1639)
  • the De Monarchia Hispanica of Tommaso Campanella[4] (Discourse Touching the Spanish Monarchy, 1654)
  • Jacques Ferrand on 'erotic melancholy',[5]
  • the Riti Ebraici of Leon of Modena (The history of the rites, customes, and manner of life, of the present Jews, throughout the world,' 1650)
  • the Curiositez of Jacques Gaffarel,[6] (Unheard-of Curiosities Concerning the Talismanical Sculpture of the Persians, 1650)

and other works. He produced a catalogue of the Greek manuscripts in the Bodleian Library. He was a clerical defender of astrology,[7] in his translation of Gaffarel.

Anthony Wood described him as "a choice mathematician, a noted critic, and one that understood several tongues, especially the Greek, very well" (Wood, Ath. Oxon., 3.350–51)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ HOASM: Edmund Chilmead
  2. ^ a b Gibson 1887.
  3. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "John Malalas". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  4. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Tommaso Campanella". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  5. ^ PDF, in French, p. 1; published in 1640 as Erotomania or a Treatise Discoursing of the Essence, Causes, Symptomes, Prognosticks, and Cure of Love, or Erotique Melancholy.
  6. ^ Bibliographie Astrologique : Catalogue Alphabétique des Textes Astrologiques Français (C.A.T.A.F.) - par Jacques Halbronn
  7. ^ Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic (1971), p. 451 of Penguin edition.

References[edit]

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainGibson, John Westby (1887). "Chilmead, Edmund". In Stephen, Leslie. Dictionary of National Biography 10. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 
  • Concise Dictionary of National Biography
  • Mordechai Feingold, Penelope M. Gouk, An early critique of Bacon's Sylva Sylvarum: Edmund Chilmead's treatise on sound, Annals of Science, Volume 40, Issue 2 March 1983, pp. 139–157