Edmund Freeman

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For the printer and publisher in Boston, Massachusetts, see Edmund Freeman (printer).

Edmund Freeman (c. July 25, 1596–1682) was one of the founders of Sandwich, Massachusetts and an Assistant Governor of Plymouth Colony under Governor William Bradford.[1][2]

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Freeman was the son of Edmund and Alice (Coles) Freeman of Pulborough, Sussex, England and was baptised July 25, 1596. Edmund married firstly to Bennett Hodsoll on June 16, 1617, she was buried at Pulborough on April 12, 1630. Freeman along with his second wife Elizabeth and his family set sail from Plymouth, England on 4 June 1635 aboard The Abigail. During the crossing an epidemic of smallpox broke out on shipboard. They arrived in Boston on 8 October 1635 and then settled in Saugus.[3]

Edmund (or Edmond) Freeman was admitted freeman at Plymouth on 23 January 1637.

He was one of the ten founders of Sandwich, Massachusetts. Freeman died in 1682 in Sandwich. He is buried in a well-known, marked private burial plot in Sandwich along with his second wife Elizabeth.

Marriage and family[edit]

His son Edmund Freeman, Jr. baptized on November 26, 1620 at Billingshurst, Sussex County, England and died before January 5, 1703/1704. He married Rebecca Prence, on April 22, 1646 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She was born circa 1625 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts and died before July 18, 1651 at Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

She was a daughter of Gov. Thomas Prence and Patience Brewster, a daughter of Elder William Brewster (pilgrim), (c. 1567 - April 10, 1644), the Pilgrim leader and spiritual elder of the Plymouth Colony and a passenger on the Mayflower.

His son John Freeman bapt. on January 28, 1626/1627,at Billingshurst, Sussex County, England and died on October 28, 1719 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

First as a Lieutenant, then as Captain, and later as Major he took an active part in the Indian Wars. He was a major in the expedition against Indians at Saconet in 1677. He served as a member Council of War from 1667-76. He served as captain in the fight against Indians at Taunton in 1675. He was a major of Barnstable Troop in 1685 and Deputy at Eastham for eight years. He served as a selectman for ten years starting in 1663. On December 7, 1692, he was appointed to the Bench of the Court of Common Pleas. For many years he was a Deacon of the Eastham Congregational Church.

John married Mercy Prence, on February 13, 1649 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts. She was born circa 1631 at Plymouth, Plymouth County, Massachusetts and died on September 28, 1711 at Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.

She was a daughter of Gov. Thomas Prence and Patience Brewster, a daughter of Elder William Brewster (pilgrim), (c. 1567 - April 10, 1644), the Pilgrim leader and spiritual elder of the Plymouth Colony and a passenger on the Mayflower.

Through him descends the notorious Lizzie Borden.[1]

There is no good evidence for the maiden surname of Elizabeth, second wife of Edmund Freeman. Robert Charles Anderson lists her surname as blank.[4] Homer Worthington Brainard says she was a widow, Elizabeth Perry.[5] Both Rosemary Canfield and Henry J. Perry suggest that she may have been the Elizabeth Raymer who married at Shipley, Sussex, 10 Aug 1632, Edmund Freeman.[6] Shipley is a village about four miles from Billinghurst on the road to Cowfold.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lizzie Andrew Borden Website, Writer's Corner Interviews — William Pavao, Curator for the Lizzie Borden Museum at the Lizzie Borden B&B, in Fall River, MA
  2. ^ History of Old Yarmouth: Comprising the Present Towns of Yarmouth and Dennis, Charles Francis Swift, 1884, page 28
  3. ^ Bradford, William (1912) [1650]. History of Plymouth Plantation, 1620–1647. Vol. 2. Massachusetts Historical Society. p. 336, footnote 1. Retrieved 2008-11-24. 
  4. ^ Anderson, Robert Charles. The Great Migration. Vol. II. p. 579. 
  5. ^ Brainard, Homer Worthington. The American Genealogist XVII. p. 2:89. 
  6. ^ Canfield, Rosemary. The Second Boat 1. p. 1:15ff.