Edmund Root

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Edmund Spence Root
34th Naval Governor of Guam
In office
May 15, 1931 – June 21, 1933
Preceded by Willis W. Bradley
Succeeded by George Andrew Alexander
Personal details
Born (1881-12-27)December 27, 1881
Delaware, Ohio
Died February 27, 1961(1961-02-27) (aged 79)
San Diego County, California
Nationality  United States
Alma mater United States Naval Academy
Military service
Allegiance  United States
Service/branch United States Navy Seal United States Navy
Rank US-O6 insignia.svg Captain
Commands USS Rizal
USS Astoria
USS Rowan
Awards Letter of Commendation

Edmund Spence Root (December 27, 1881 – February 27, 1961) was a United States Navy Captain who served as the 34th Naval Governor of Guam. He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1905, serving on many ships as an ensign. He served as the inaugural commanding officer of two ships: the USS Rizal and the USS Astoria. He served during World War I as commander of the U-boat hunting USS Rowan, for which he received a letter of commendation. As governor, he generated controversy by expelling 112 Japanese laborers from Guam.[1] The Guam Museum also opened during his term of office.

Naval career[edit]

Root was appointed to the United States Naval Academy from Ohio in 1901.[2] He reported aboard the USS Alabama in 1906,[3] and 1908 he served aboard the USS Maine as an ensign.[4] On April 4, 1910, he began service aboard the USS Bainbridge.[5]

In 1913, he served aboard the USS Glacier.[6] During World War I, Root served within the Bureau of Navigation and then with the Destroyer fleet stationed out of Queenstown, Ireland. In the war, he commanded the USS Rowan, specifically seeking out and engaging German U-boats, for which he received a letter of commendation.[7] On May 28, 1919, Root set sail aboard the USS Rizal as her first commanding officer.[8] In 1934, he served as the first commanding officer of the USS Astoria.[9] In the 1940s, he headed the naval officer procurement program in Chicago, where he oversaw the area's initial WAVES program.[10]

Governorship[edit]

Root served as Naval Governor of Guam from May 15, 1931 to June 21, 1933.[11] Root caused controversy between the United States and Japanese governments in 1933 when he expelled 112 Japanese citizens from Guam after their residence permits expired.[1] The Guam Museum opened during his term.[12] The Edmund S. Root Agricultural School in Guam is named in his honor.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "U.S. Expels Japanese". The Vancouver Sun (Vancouver). Postmedia Network. 6 May 1933. p. 20. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  2. ^ United States Congressional Serial Set (4350). Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. 1902. p. 88. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  3. ^ "Alabama". Paradise of the Pacific. 19-22: 29. 1906. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  4. ^ "Photo #: NH 106227". Online Library of Selected Images. Washington, D.C.: Naval History & Heritage Command. 15 November 2008. Archived from the original on 6 April 2011. Retrieved 6 April 2011. 
  5. ^ Annual Report of the Navy Department. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. 1910. p. 59. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  6. ^ Register of the Commissioned and Warrant Officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps (1914). Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. 1914. p. 32. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  7. ^ Associated Press (7 April 1931). "Capt. Root Named Governor of Guam". The New York Times (New York City). The New York Times Company. p. 39. 
  8. ^ Mooney, James (1981). "Rizal". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Washington, D.C.: Naval History & Heritage Command. Archived from the original on 6 April 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2011. 
  9. ^ Mooney, James (1981). "Astoria". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. Washington, D.C.: Naval History & Heritage Command. Archived from the original on 6 April 2011. Retrieved 6 April 2011. 
  10. ^ "Enlistment of WAVES Begins This Week". Ludington Daily News (Ludington, Michigan). 14 September 1942. p. 2. Retrieved 7 April 2011. 
  11. ^ "Naval Era Governors of Guam". Guampedia. Guam: University of Guam. 10 August 2010. Archived from the original on 29 October 2010. Retrieved 4 April 2011. 
  12. ^ DeLisle, Christine Taitano (2010). Civilizing the Guam Museum. Working Papers in Museum Studies (4) (Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan). p. 4. 
  13. ^ Underwood, Robert (29 February 2000). "Fiftieth Anniversary". Congressional Record (Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office) 146: 1785. Retrieved 6 April 2011.