Edvard Weie

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Viggo Thorvald Edvard Weie (1879-1943) was a Danish painter. His style was influenced by journeys to Italy (1907) and Paris (1912) where he came into contact with French impressionists such as Cézanne.

After returning to Denmark in 1912, he spent a period on the tiny island of Christiansø near Bornholm. He was one of the earliest participants in the Bornholm school of painters, contributing to landscapes and seascapes in a distinctive modernistic style.

The greys of his earlier work soon gave way to brighter colours in his dramatic cubist compositions combining sea, rocks and figures, several including Poseidon, with violent brushstrokes. In his later work, the strokes can hardly be seen and his paintings seem to be characterised by mystic dreams. Finally he experimented with richer, glowing colours and lighter brushwork.[1]

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