Edward Dithmar

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Edward Dithmar
23rd Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin
In office
January 4, 1915 – January 3, 1921
Governor Emanuel Philipp
Preceded by Thomas Morris
Succeeded by George Comings
Personal details
Born Edward Dithmar
(1873-01-31)January 31, 1873
Reedsburg, Wisconsin, U.S.
Died September 22, 1938(1938-09-22) (aged 65)
Baraboo, Wisconsin, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Emily A. (Upham) Dithmar
Children Edward Upham Dithmar
John Upham Dithmar
Parents Rudolph E. Dithmar
Fredericka (Dargel) Dithmar
Alma mater University of Wisconsin–Madison
Profession Lawyer
Politician

Edward Frederick Dithmar (January 31, 1873 – September 22, 1938) was an American lawyer and politician from Wisconsin. He served as the 23rd Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin.

Early life[edit]

Dithmar was born in Reedsburg, Wisconsin in 1873, the son of Rudolph E. Dithmar and Fredericka (Dargel) Dithmar. He attended Reedsburg Area High School[1] and graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1894.[2] He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1899. He began the practice of law in Baraboo.[3]

Political career[edit]

He held many political positions in Wisconsin, and began his political career as a messenger in the Wisconsin State Assembly in 1889. Dithmar served as a court clerk in Sauk County from 1894 until 1900,[4] and as register of probate in Baraboo.[5] He was chairman of the Sauk County Republican committee for four years and served as vice-chairman of the Wisconsin State Central Committee during the 1910 campaign.[6] He served as the 23rd Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin for three terms, from 1915 until 1921, under Governor Emanuel L. Philipp.[7] He ran for the United States Senate in 1925 and for Governor of Wisconsin in 1928; he was unsuccessful in both elections.

He died in 1938 in Baraboo, Wisconsin.[8][9]

Family life[edit]

Dithmar married Emily A. Upham in 1894. They had two children,[10] Edward Upham Dithmar and John Upham Dithmar.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ State of Wisconsin Blue Book (1919). State of Wisconsin Blue Book. State of Wisconsin Blue Book. p. 452. 
  2. ^ Thwaites, Reuben Gold (1900). The University of Wisconsin: its history and its alumni, with historical and descriptive sketches of Madison. J. N. Purcell. p. 804. 
  3. ^ Cole, Harry Ellsworth (1918). A Standard History of Sauk County, Wisconsin, Volume 2. Lewis Publishing Company. p. 1011. 
  4. ^ Cole, Harry Ellsworth (1918). A Standard History of Sauk County, Wisconsin, Volume 1. Lewis Publishing Company. p. 237. 
  5. ^ Thwaites, Reuben Gold (1900). The University of Wisconsin: its history and its alumni, with historical and descriptive sketches of Madison. J. N. Purcell. p. 804. 
  6. ^ State of Wisconsin Blue Book (1919). State of Wisconsin Blue Book. State of Wisconsin Blue Book. p. 452. 
  7. ^ Legislative Reference Bureau (1987). Blue Book, 1987-1988. Legislative Reference Bureau. p. 704. 
  8. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1915,' Biographical Sketch of Edward F. Dithmar, pg. 484
  9. ^ 'Obituary of Edward F. Dithmar,' Wisconsin State Journal, September 22, 1938
  10. ^ "Edward F Dithmar". Ancestry.com. Retrieved May 21, 2014. 
  11. ^ Legislative Reference Bureau (1917). Wisconsin Blue Book, 1917. Legislative Reference Bureau. p. 500. 

External links[edit]


Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Morris
Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin
1915–1921
Succeeded by
George Comings