Edward Stanton (British Army officer)

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For other people named Edward Stanton, see Edward Stanton.

General Sir Edward Stanton, KCB, KCMG[1][2] (19 February 1827[3] – 1907[4]) was a British officer and diplomat.

Edward Stanton was the son of William H. Stanton, Esq., of Stroud, Gloucestershire. Born on 19 February 1827, he was educated at Woolwich Academy.[5] He was commissioned as second lieutenant in the Royal Engineers on 19 December 1844.[3] He served in the Crimean War,[1] which was fought from 1853 to 1856 between the Russian Empire on one side and an alliance of France, the United Kingdom, the Kingdom of Sardinia, and the Ottoman Empire on the other. From 1856 to 1857, he served on the boundary commission that determined the Russo-Turkish borders.[6]

He was appointed Consul-General in Warsaw, Poland on 7 December 1860,[7] Agent and Consul-General in Egypt on 15 May 1865,[8] and Chargé d'Affaires to the King of Bavaria on 10 May 1876.[9] During his visit to Egypt, English author and poet Edward Lear described Sir Edward Stanton as "very good-natured".[10] Sir Edward Stanton retired as a general in 1881 and received a knighthood the following year.[11]

Family[edit]

In 1862, Edward Stanton married Lady Margarette Constance Stanton. He was a relative on her mother's side of the family.[11] His son Colonel Edward Alexander Stanton (1867–1947) served in Egypt at Omdurman, was Governor of Khartoum from 1900 to 1908, and military governor of Haifa (the Phoenicia Division of Palestine) from 1918 to 1920.[12]

Honours[edit]

In addition to his British honours, Sir Edward Stanton was a Knight of the French Legion of Honour.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Burke, Edmund; Dodsley, James (1908). Annual Register (6 ed.). Printed for J. Dodsley. p. 128. 
  2. ^ a b Burke, Bernard; Burke, John (1972). Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Landed Gentry. Vol. 2 (18 ed.). Burke's Peerage. p. 583. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  3. ^ a b Royal Engineers; Whitworth Porter (1915). History of the Corps of Royal Engineers. Longmans, Green. p. 309. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  4. ^ "Stanton, Sir Edward (1827–1907) Knight General Diplomat". National Register of Archives. The National Archives. Retrieved 10 June 2009. 
  5. ^ Dawson, Warren Royal (1951). Who Was Who in Egyptology (2nd ed.). Egypt Exploration Society. p. 152. OCLC 506864. 
  6. ^ Fenwick, SC. "Boundary Commissions – 1832–1911". Corps History – Part 12: Engineers in a Civic role (1820–1911). Royal Engineers Museum. Retrieved 10 June 2009. 
  7. ^ The London Gazette: no. 22457. p. 4959. 7 December 1860. Retrieved 26 June 2009.
  8. ^ The London Gazette: no. 22974. p. 2806. 30 May 1865. Retrieved 26 June 2009.
  9. ^ The London Gazette: no. 24334. p. 3407. 9 June 1876. Retrieved 26 June 2009.
  10. ^ Lear, Edward; Strachey Strachie; Constance Braham (1911). "Chapter I: England, Nice, Malta, Egypt, Cannes". Later Letters of Edward Lear: to Chichester Fortescue (Lord Carlingford), Lady Waldegrave and Others. Ayer Publishing. p. 65. ISBN 978-0-8369-6617-6. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  11. ^ a b Law, Edward. "Huddersfield Titled Classes". Retrieved 5 July 2009. 
  12. ^ Home, Robert K. (1997). Of Planting and Planning: The Making of British Colonial Cities. Taylor & Francis. p. 168. ISBN 978-0-419-20230-1. Retrieved 6 July 2009. 
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
John Lintorn Arabin Simmons1
British Consul-General at Warsaw
1860 – 1865
Succeeded by
Charles Edward Mansfield2
Preceded by
Robert Colquhoun3
British Agent and Consul-General in Egypt
1865 – 1876
Succeeded by
Lord Vivian4
Preceded by
Robert Morier5
British Chargé d'Affaires to the King of Bavaria
1876 – 1882
Succeeded by
Hugh Macdonell6
Notes and references
1. The London Gazette: no. 22102. p. 970. 26 February 1858. Retrieved 26 June 2009.
2.The London Gazette: no. 22984. p. 3203. 27 June 1865. Retrieved 26 June 2009.
3.The London Gazette: no. 22219. p. 128. 14 January 1859. Retrieved 26 June 2009.
4.The London Gazette: no. 24342. p. 3820. 4 July 1876. Retrieved 20 June 2009.
5.The London Gazette: no. 23824. p. 357. 2 February 1872. Retrieved 22 June 2008.
6.The London Gazette: no. 25080. p. 949. 3 March 1882. Retrieved 22 June 2008.