Edward W. Townsend

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Edward W. Townsend

Edward Waterman Townsend (February 10, 1855, Cleveland, Ohio - March 15, 1942, New York City) was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey's 7th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1911 to 1913, and the 10th district from 1913–1915, after redistricting following the United States Census, 1910.

Biography[edit]

Townsend was born in Cleveland, Ohio on February 10, 1855, and attended private and public schools in that city. He went to San Francisco, California in 1875 and engaged in newspaper and literary work. He moved to New York City in 1893 and continued his reportorial and literary pursuits. In 1900, he became a resident of Montclair, New Jersey. He was an author of novels, plays, short stories, as well as a textbook on the United States Constitution. His most popular fictional writings were his "Chimmie Fadden" Bowery boy stories.[1]

Townsend was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-second and Sixty-third Congresses, serving in office from March 4, 1911-March 3, 1915, but was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1914 to the Sixty-fourth Congress.

After leaving Congress, he served as postmaster of Montclair from 1915-1923. Townsend moved to New York City in 1924 and resumed newspaper and literary pursuits, and was a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. He died in New York City on March 15, 1942, and was interred in Forest Hill Cemetery in Utica, New York.

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United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Richard W. Parker
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 7th congressional district

March 4, 1911-March 3, 1913
Succeeded by
Robert G. Bremner
Preceded by
James A. Hamill
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New Jersey's 10th congressional district

March 4, 1913-March 3, 1915
Succeeded by
Frederick R. Lehlbach