Egebergs Ærespris

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The Egebergs Ærespris ("Honorary Prize of Egeberg") is a prize awarded to Norwegian athletes who excel in more than one sport. The prize was created by Ferdinand Julian Egeberg, and consists of a bronze statuette modelled by sculptor Magnus Vigrestad.[1]

History[edit]

In 1917 a donation of NOK 10,000 was given by Cabinet Chamberlain Ferdinand Julian Egeberg to the sports association Norges Riksforbund for Idræt. His donation was basis for the sports prize Kabinetskammerherre Egebergs ærespris for alsidig idrett. The statutes for the award were agreed on 10 February 1920. The basic capital was not to be touched, while the fund's interests should be used for a prize given to a sportsperson who, during the last two years, had excelled in one sport and also showed eminent performances in another, completely different sport.[2] The prize is a bronze statuette modelled by sculptor Magnus Vigrestad,[1] who won the design competition.[2] The prize was regarded the highest achievement in Norwegian sport at the time.[2] The statutes have changed slightly over the years. Today the prize is awarded by the Norwegian Olympic and Paralympic Committee and Confederation of Sports, and given to Norwegian sports people who have excelled nationally in at least two sports, and excelled internationally in at least one of these.[1] The first awardee was skier and football player Gunnar Andersen, who received the prize for 1918. The first female recipient was Laila Schou Nilsen, who received the prize for 1936 for her achievements in skiing, speed-skating and tennis.[2] In 1983 Cato Zahl Pedersen received the prize (for 1981) for disabled sports.[3]

Award winners[edit]

The award has been given to the following athletes:[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bryhn, Rolf. "Egebergs ærespris". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 20 November 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d Nordahl, Gunnar; Tyrihjell, Odd (1961). Norsk idrett gjennom hundre år (in Norwegian). Oslo: Aschehoug. pp. 167–168. 
  3. ^ Hauge, Odd Harald. "Cato Zahl Pedersen". In Helle, Knut. Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 22 February 2010. 
  4. ^ Bryhn, Rolf. "Egebergs ærespris – Egebergs ærespris". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 20 November 2009.