Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey

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Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Egg Harbor
Map of Egg Harbor Township in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Egg Harbor Township in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°22′42″N 74°35′59″W / 39.378291°N 74.599779°W / 39.378291; -74.599779Coordinates: 39°22′42″N 74°35′59″W / 39.378291°N 74.599779°W / 39.378291; -74.599779[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[3]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor James J. McCullough (term ends December 31, 2015)[4][5]
 • Administrator Peter J. Miller[6]
 • Clerk Eileen M. Tedesco[7]
Area[1]
 • Total 74.934 sq mi (194.077 km2)
 • Land 66.598 sq mi (172.488 km2)
 • Water 8.336 sq mi (21.590 km2)  11.12%
Area rank 12th of 566 in state
3rd of 23 in county[1]
Elevation[8] 43 ft (13 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11]
 • Total 43,323
 • Estimate (2014)[12] 43,851
 • Rank 44th of 566 in state
1st of 23 in county[13]
 • Density 650.5/sq mi (251.2/km2)
 • Density rank 419th of 566 in state
11th of 23 in county[13]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08232, 08234[14][15]
Area code(s) 609[16]
FIPS code 3400120290[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882051[1][19]
Website www.ehtgov.org

Egg Harbor Township is a township in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 43,323,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 12,597 (+41.0%) from the 30,726 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 6,182 (+25.2%) from the 24,544 counted in the 1990 Census.[20][21][22]

Egg Harbor Township was first mentioned as part of Gloucester County in records dating back to March 20, 1693, and at times was called New Weymouth. The township's western boundary was established on May 13, 1761, with the area called Great Egg-Harbour Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Galloway Township, which was established by Royal charter on April 4, 1774. Additional portions were taken to form Weymouth Township on February 12, 1798. On February 21, 1798, the area was incorporated as Egg-Harbour Township. Over the ensuing centuries, portions of the township were taken to create many new municipalities: Hamilton Township on February 5, 1813; Atlantic City on May 1, 1854; Absecon on May 1, 1854; South Atlantic City (now Margate City) on September 7, 1885; Pleasantville on January 10, 1889; Linwood on February 20, 1889; Somers Point on April 24, 1886; Longport on March 7, 1898; Ventnor City on March 17, 1903; and Northfield on March 21, 1905.[23]

Great Egg Harbor got its name from Dutch explorer Cornelius Jacobsen Mey. In 1614, Mey came upon the inlet to the Great Egg Harbor River. The meadows were so covered with shorebird and waterfowl eggs that he called it "Eieren Haven" (Egg Harbor).[24]

History[edit]

The first residents of what would become Egg Harbor Township were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans, who would spend their summers on the elevated land around the cedar swamp that is now Bargaintown Lake, as well as along the banks of Patcong Creek, where they made use of the abundant fish, shellfish, wild berries, and bird's eggs in the area and collected shells that could be carved to make wampum.[25]

Great Egg Harbor was originally part of Gloucester County. In 1694 a law was passed that read "forasmuch as there are families settled upon the Egg Harbor, and of right ought to be under some jurisdiction, be it enacted by the authority aforesaid that the inhabitants of the said Egg Harbor shall and do belong to the jurisdiction of Gloucester."[26]

In 1710, by an Act of the Legislature, legal boundaries of Gloucester County were set from the Delaware River, along the Burlington County line to the sea and back up the Great Egg Harbor River to the Delaware River.[27] At that time Great Egg Harbor encompassed all of present-day Atlantic County. In 1837, Atlantic County was set apart from Gloucester County and the Townships were Egg Harbor, Galloway, Hamilton and Weymouth.[28]

Since 1837, ten municipalities have separated from the original Egg Harbor Township, including Atlantic City (1854), Absecon (1872), South Atlantic City (now Margate) (1885), Somers Point (1886), Pleasantville (1888), Linwood (1889), Longport (1898), Brigantine (1903), Ventnor (1903) and Northfield (1905).[23]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 74.934 square miles (194.077 km2), including 66.598 square miles (172.488 km2) of land and 8.336 square miles (21.590 km2or 11.12%).[1][2]

Portions of the township, notably the West Atlantic City and Anchorage Poynte areas, are not contiguous to the main body of the municipality, having been separated from the mainland portion of the township as municipalities were formed, largely since the boroughitis phenomenon in the 1890s.[29]

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[30] Part of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[31]

Egg Harbor Township includes the unincorporated communities of Bargaintown (the township's seat of government[32]), Cardiff, English Creek, Farmington, Scullville (formerly known as Jeffers), Steelmanville and West Atlantic City, as well as part of McKee City.[33] Other localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Devenshire, English Creek Landing, Greenwood, Idlewood, Jeffers Landing, Jobs Point, Jones Island, McKee City Station, Mount Calvary, Pleasantville Terrace, Pork Island, Rainbow Islands and Sculls Landing.[34]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,830
1820 1,635 * −10.7%
1830 2,510 53.5%
1840 2,739 9.1%
1850 2,689 −1.8%
1860 3,207 * 19.3%
1870 3,585 11.8%
1880 3,568 −0.5%
1890 3,027 * −15.2%
1900 1,863 * −38.5%
1910 1,110 * −40.4%
1920 1,360 22.5%
1930 3,024 122.4%
1940 3,066 1.4%
1950 4,991 62.8%
1960 5,593 12.1%
1970 9,882 76.7%
1980 19,381 96.1%
1990 24,544 26.6%
2000 30,726 25.2%
2010 43,323 41.0%
Est. 2014 43,851 [12][35] 1.2%
Population sources:
1810-1920[36] 1810-1830[37]
1840-2000[38] 1840[39] 1850-1870[40]
1850[41] 1870[42] 1880-1890[43]
1890-1910[44] 1910-1930[45]
1930-1990[46] 2000[20][47] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[23]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 43,323 people, 15,250 households, and 11,316 families residing in the township. The population density was 650.5 per square mile (251.2/km2). There were 16,347 housing units at an average density of 245.5 per square mile (94.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 69.78% (30,230) White, 9.58% (4,152) Black or African American, 0.38% (163) Native American, 11.76% (5,096) Asian, 0.02% (8) Pacific Islander, 5.20% (2,253) from other races, and 3.28% (1,421) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 13.00% (5,630) of the population.[9]

There were 15,250 households, of which 36.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.1% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.29.[9]

In the township, 26.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 29.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.2 years. For every 100 females there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $69,754 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,024) and the median family income was $78,259 (+/- $4,966). Males had a median income of $52,615 (+/- $3,434) versus $42,227 (+/- $2,127) for females. The per capita income for the township was $29,114 (+/- $1,241). About 4.0% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.8% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.[48]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 30,726 people, 11,199 households, and 8,108 families residing in the township. The population density was people per square mile (176.1/km²). There were 12,067 housing units at an average density of 179.2/sq mi (69.2/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 79.42% White, 10.37% African American, 0.21% Native American, 5.05% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 2.82% from other races, and 2.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.76% of the population.[20][47]

There were 111,990 households out of which 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 12.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.6% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.23.[20][47]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 32.6% from 25 to 44, 23.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 94.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.7 males.[20][47]

The median income for a household in the township was $52,550, and the median income for a family was $60,032. Males had a median income of $40,033 versus $30,643 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,328. About 4.2% of families and 5.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.2% of those under age 18 and 9.3% of those age 65 or over.[20][47]

Economy[edit]

Harbor Square (formerly the Shore Mall) is a redesigned regional mall that had originally opened in 1968, located on U.S. Route 40 / U.S. Route 322.[49]

Development and the Pine Barrens[edit]

Egg Harbor Township (along with Hamilton and Galloway Townships) has been designated a growth area by the New Jersey Pinelands Commission and is therefore currently experiencing heavy development. In exchange for the development in Egg Harbor Township, no trees are demolished for housing and other buildings in the Pine Barrens, also known as the Pinelands. This "heavy development" consists of a state mandated construction of almost 30,000 additional housing units. The neighboring communities, Galloway Township and Hamilton Township have also been assigned similar construction numbers by the New Jersey Pinelands Commission.[50]

On January 22, 2007, the Egg Harbor Township Planning Board gave site approval for 660 new homes (and a new fire station) in the Farmington section of Egg Harbor Township. The Village at Farmington will be developed by Pulte Homes Corporation and will include 140 townhouses, 261 planned adult homes (55 and older) and 259 single family detached dwellings, as well as a community clubhouse, a second club house for 55 and older, recreation fields and walking paths to be constructed on a site covering 273.6 acres (1.107 km2). Pulte Homes will donate $800,000 to the Egg Harbor Township recreation fund because the club houses and paths do not satisfy the township's recreation requirements for a development of this size and will also contribute $350,000 for a second Farmington Fire Station and the landowners, Schoffer Enterprises, will donate the land.

Once approvals are complete, Pulte says that they will build 60 units of each type per year until the project is complete. Pulte Homes Corporation plans to offer single family homes in the mid $300,000's and the adult homes for $250,000.

The Planning Board has requested that paperwork presented to the homeowners at purchase will "warn" residents that there is a nearby airport (Atlantic City International Airport, which in addition to functioning as a full service airport is home to the 177th wing of the Air National Guard and the Atlantic City base for the United States Coast Guard), meaning they will be in the approach and takeoff patterns for incoming and outgoing aircraft, the Atlantic County Municipal Utility Authority (ACMUA), where all local municipalities bring their trash and recycle, which at given times of the year brings some pretty extensive landfill odors and a shooting range nearby.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

The Township of Egg Harbor is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government by a five-member Township Committee. Members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms in office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for vote each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[3] The Mayor and Deputy Mayor are chosen by the Township Committee from among its members during the Reorganization meeting each January. The members of Township Committee are part-time elected officials.

As of 2015, members of the Egg Harbor Township Committee are Mayor James J. McCullough (R, term on committee and as mayor ends December 31, 2015), Deputy Mayor Paul W. Hodson, Jr. (R, 2017), Joe Cafero (R, 2016), Frank Finnerty (R, 2015; serving an unexpired term) and Laura Pfrommer (R, 2017).[4][51][52][53][54][55]

In January 2015, Frank Finnerty was appointed to fill the vacant seat of John Carman, who had taken a seat on the Atlantic County Board of Chosen Freeholders.[56]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Egg Harbor Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[57] and is part of New Jersey's 2nd state legislative district.[10][58][59]

New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Frank LoBiondo (R, Ventnor City).[60] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[61] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[62][63]

The 2nd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Jim Whelan (D, Atlantic City) and in the General Assembly by Chris A. Brown (R, Ventnor City) and John F. Amodeo (D, Northfield).[64] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[65] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[66]

Atlantic County is governed by a directly elected executive and a nine-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, responsible for legislation. The executive serves a four-year term and the freeholders are elected to staggered three-year terms, of which four are elected from the county on an at-large basis and five of the freeholders represent equally populated districts.[67][68] As of 2015, Atlantic County's Executive is Republican Dennis Levinson, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015.[69] Members of the Board of Chosen Freeholders are Chairman Frank D. Formica, Freeholder District 2, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part), Linwood, Longport, Margate, Northfield, Somers Point and Ventnor (R, 2015),[70] Vice Chairman James A. Bertino, Freeholder District 5, including Buena Borough, Buena Vista Township, Corbin City, Egg Harbor City, Estell Manor, Folsom, Hamilton Township (part), Hammonton, Mullica Township and Weymouth (R, 2015),[71] Colin G. Bell, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2015),[72] John Carman, Freeholder District 3, including Egg Harbor Township (part) and Hamilton Township (part) (R, 2017),[73] Ernest D. Coursey, Freeholder District 1, including Atlantic City (part), Egg Harbor Township (part) and Pleasantville (R, 2016),[74] Richard Dase, Freeholder District 4, including Absecon, Brigantine, Galloway Township and Port Republic (D, 2016),[75] Alexander C. Marino, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2017),[76] Will Pauls, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2016)[77] and John W. Risley, Freeholder At-Large (R, 2017).[78][79][80] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Edward P. McGettigan (2016),[81] Sheriff Frank X. Balles (R, 2017)[82] and Surrogate James Curcio (2015).[83][84]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 24,922 registered voters in Egg Harbor Township, of which 5,829 (23.4% vs. 30.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 6,976 (28.0% vs. 25.2%) were registered as Republicans and 12,108 (48.6% vs. 44.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 9 voters registered to other parties.[85] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 57.5% (vs. 58.8% in Atlantic County) were registered to vote, including 78.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 76.6% countywide).[85][86]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 9,854 votes here (54.5% vs. 57.9% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 7,989 votes (44.2% vs. 41.1%) and other candidates with 158 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 18,089 ballots cast by the township's 27,052 registered voters, for a turnout of 66.9% (vs. 65.8% in Atlantic County).[87][88] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 9,741 votes here (53.0% vs. 56.5% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 8,303 votes (45.1% vs. 41.6%) and other candidates with 223 votes (1.2% vs. 1.1%), among the 18,394 ballots cast by the township's 25,393 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.4% (vs. 68.1% in Atlantic County).[89] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 7,658 votes here (51.6% vs. 46.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 6,981 votes (47.1% vs. 52.0%) and other candidates with 106 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 14,830 ballots cast by the township's 19,664 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.4% (vs. 69.8% in the whole county).[90]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 6,874 votes here (62.7% vs. 60.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 3,717 votes (33.9% vs. 34.9%) and other candidates with 144 votes (1.3% vs. 1.3%), among the 10,972 ballots cast by the township's 27,827 registered voters, yielding a 39.4% turnout (vs. 41.5% in the county).[91][92] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 5,795 votes here (53.4% vs. 47.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 4,236 votes (39.1% vs. 44.5%), Independent Chris Daggett with 608 votes (5.6% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 121 votes (1.1% vs. 1.2%), among the 10,844 ballots cast by the township's 24,942 registered voters, yielding a 43.5% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[93]

Surrounding communities[edit]

Note: This includes the adjacent municipalities that are in the "West Atlantic City and Anchorage Poynte" sections.

Education[edit]

The Egg Harbor Township Schools serve public school students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's seven schools had an enrollment of 7,800 students and 572.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.63:1.[94] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[95]) are Clayton J. Davenport Complex[96] with 911 students, Slaybaugh Complex[97] with 891 students and H. Russell Swift School[98] with 458 students for grades PreK-3, Dr. Joy D. Miller School[99] with 1,204 students in grades 4-5, Alder Avenue Middle School[100] with 828 students and Fernwood Avenue Middle School[101] with 985 students for grades 6-8, along with Egg Harbor Township High School[102] with 2,523 students in grades 9-12.[103]

Township public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology in Mays Landing[104] or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts in Somers Point.[105]

Transportation[edit]

A majority of the Atlantic City Airport is located in the northern area of the township.[106]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 297.22 miles (478.33 km) of roadways, of which 206.73 miles (332.70 km) were maintained by the municipality, 65.46 miles (105.35 km) by Atlantic County, 10.10 miles (16.25 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 14.93 miles (24.03 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority and South Jersey Transportation Authority.[107]

Major county roads that pass through include CR 559, CR 563, CR 575 and CR 585. US Route 40/322 run concurrent with each other while going from east to west. US Route 9 also runs through, although very briefly concurrent with the Parkway as it crosses over the Great Egg Harbor.

The Atlantic City Expressway runs through east-west for 5.3 miles (8.5 km) connecting Pleasantville in the east to Hamilton Township in the west[108] and connects at Interchange 7[109] with the Garden State Parkway (at Interchange 38[110]) that runs through north-south for 8.6 miles (13.8 km) connecting Somers Point in the south to Galloway Township in the north.[111]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service between Egg Harbor Township and Atlantic City on routes 502 (from Atlantic Cape Community College), 507 (from Ocean City), 508 (from Hamilton Mall) and 509 (from Ocean City).[112][113]

Points of interest[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Egg Harbor Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  3. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 13.
  4. ^ a b Elected Officials, Township of Egg Harbor. Accessed March 7, 2015.
  5. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed March 7, 2015. As of date accessed, McCullough is listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2014.
  6. ^ Administration, Township of Egg Harbor. Accessed March 12, 2011.
  7. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Egg Harbor. Accessed July 2, 2012.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Egg Harbor, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Egg Harbor township, Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 1, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 2. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Egg Harbor township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 5, 2012.
  12. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014 - 2014 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Egg Harbor Township, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 15, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 7, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Egg Harbor Township, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 4, 2013.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 2, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Egg Harbor township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 10, 2013.
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 30, 2012.
  22. ^ Population Density by County and Municipality: New Jersey, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 3, 2012.
  23. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 68. Accessed May 3, 2012.
  24. ^ Staff. "THE PRESS ANSWER GUY", The Press of Atlantic City, January 11, 2004. Accessed May 3, 2012. "Where exactly did the name of Egg Harbor Township originate? Did it have anything to do with eggs? Answer Guy: Yes. If you believe the local lore, the area got its name when Dutch Capt. Cornelius Jacobsen Mey hopped off his boat Fortuyn in 1614 and found he couldn't walk anywhere without stepping on egg."
  25. ^ Mason, Beryl D. Bargaintown, Sketches of Egg Harbor Township, 1964, by the Egg Harbor Township Terecentenary Publications Committee.
  26. ^ Sheridan, June. History of Egg Harbor Township, Township of Egg Harbor. Accessed May 3, 2012.
  27. ^ Lee, Michelle. "Egg Harbor Township opens celebration of 300 years of history", The Press of Atlantic City, January 21, 2010. Accessed May 3, 2012. "A parade at the Shore Mall tonight marks the founding of the township on Jan. 21, 1710, when Gloucester County incorporated its borders... which extended from the Delaware Bay southeast along the namesake Great Egg Harbor River..."
  28. ^ Staff. "CELEBRATING A COUNTY'S BIRTH WITH A TRIP THROUGH TIME", The Philadelphia Inquirer, May 11, 1987. Accessed May 3, 2012. "Their destination: a Lenape River tavern on Sugar Hill, where on May 10, 1837, nine founding freeholders met to organize Atlantic County.... At its conception, Atlantic County had four townships - Egg Harbor, Hamilton, Galloway and Weymouth - and 8164 people"
  29. ^ Lemongello, Steven. "Egg Harbor Township borders leave locals, businesses confused", The Press of Atlantic City, December 27, 2011. Accessed July 2, 2012. "Besides the main section, which contains the vast majority of residents and businesses, there is the West Atlantic City section — snugly squeezed between the embracing arms of Pleasantville — and also the large swath of marshes and islands between the mainland towns and Absecon Island.... The brand-new communities — many of them created during the manic period of “borough-itis” in the late 1890s, when dozens of practically postage stamp-sized towns across the state broke away to take advantage of a school tax loophole — took the easy route when deciding which land to include."
  30. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  31. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed November 18, 2013.
  32. ^ Mason, Beryl D. Bargaintown, Sketches of Egg Harbo Township. Accessed October 7, 2013.
  33. ^ Staff. "EGG HARBOR TOWNSHIP: A BRIEF HISTORY (TIMELINE)", The Press of Atlantic City, January 28, 2004. Accessed May 3, 2012. "It will become known as one of the seven 'outlying' schools, along with Bargaintown, Steelmanville, Farmington, McKee City, Cardiff and West Atlantic City."
  34. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 28, 2014.
  35. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  36. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  37. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Gloucester County Municipalities, 1800 - 2010, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  38. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Atlantic County Municipalities, 1840 - 2010, WestJersey.org. December 6, 2010. Accessed July 2, 2012.
  39. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 232, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  40. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 273, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 26, 2013. "Egg Harbor is situated on the Great Egg Harbor river, and contained in 1850 2,689 inhabitants, and in 1870 of 3,585."
  41. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 26, 2013.
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  43. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 26, 2013. Population of Egg Harbor Township is listed as 4,075 in 1880 and 4,255 in 1890, inclusive of Linwood borough (536 in 1890) and Absecon town (507 in 1880 and 501 in 1890).
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  117. ^ Ashe, Kelly. "Egg Harbor Township's Anastasia Cannuscio earns a berth in a world championship ice dancing event", The Press of Atlantic City, February 1, 2011. Accessed September 21, 2013. "But Egg Harbor Township's Anastasia Cannuscio and her partner, Colin McManus, will get one more opportunity to perform at the 2011 World Junior Figure Skating Championships in Gangneung, South Korea, Feb. 28-March 6."
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  120. ^ Ramirez, Christopher. "Egg Harbor Township marks 300th birthday with bash at the Shore Mall", The Press of Atlantic City, January 20, 2012. Accessed March 5, 2012. "Cub Scout Pack 94 will lead in a flag salute and township resident Toni Ann Gisondi-Pugliese will sing the national anthem."
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  123. ^ Elected Officials, Township of Egg Harbor. Accessed September 21, 2013. "James J. "Sonny" McCullough is currently serving his 24th term as Mayor of Egg Harbor Township (1986, 1988-1992 and 1996-2013).... Former State Senator of District 2."
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  125. ^ Lulgjuraj, Susan. "'The Mighty Macs,' based on Oakcrest High grad Cathy Rush, set for release today", The Press of Atlantic City, October 21, 2011. Accessed October 28, 2011. "Cathy Rush invited friends to her home in Ventnor a couple of years ago to watch an advance copy of the movie The Mighty Macs....Rush, a native of West Atlantic City in Egg Harbor Township, saw the filming of this movie.... 'My stomach dropped,' said Rush, a 1964 Oakcrest High School graduate. 'It was the most disconcerting thing because it was real.'"
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