El Dorado County, California

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For the California wine region, see El Dorado AVA.
El Dorado County, California
County
County of El Dorado
L StarksGradeBarn.jpg Sugar Pine Point State Park 1.jpg
American river running through the El Dorado hills.jpg 2009-0724-CA-MarhallDiscoverySite.jpg
Images, from top down, left to right: A barn in El Dorado County, the shore of Lake Tahoe in Ed Z'berg Sugar Pine Point State Park, the South Fork American River running through the El Dorado hills, Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park
Flag of El Dorado County, California
Flag
Official seal of El Dorado County, California
Seal
Location in the state of California
Location in the state of California
California's location in the United States
California's location in the United States
Country  United States of America
State  California
Regions Sierra Nevada, Gold Country
Metropolitan area Greater Sacramento
Incorporated February 18, 1850[1]
County seat Placerville
Largest city South Lake Tahoe (population and area)
Area
 • Total 1,786 sq mi (4,630 km2)
 • Land 1,708 sq mi (4,420 km2)
 • Water 78 sq mi (200 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Total 181,058
 • Density 100/sq mi (39/km2)
Time zone Pacific Standard Time (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-7)
Website www.edcgov.us

El Dorado County, officially the County of El Dorado, is a county located in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 181,058.[2] The county seat is Placerville.[3]

El Dorado County is included in the Sacramento-Roseville-Arden-Arcade, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is located in the historic Gold Country in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

The population of El Dorado County has grown as Greater Sacramento has expanded into the region. In the unique Lake Tahoe area of the county, environmental awareness and environmental protection initiatives have grown along with the population since the 1960 Winter Olympics, hosted at Squaw Valley Ski Resort in neighboring Placer County.

History[edit]

El Dorado County, the first in which gold was discovered, is derived from the Spanish meaning "the gilded".[4]

Local landmarks:

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,786 square miles (4,630 km2), of which 1,708 square miles (4,420 km2) is land and 78 square miles (200 km2) (4.4%) is water.[5]

Geographic features[edit]

Recreation[edit]

Parks[edit]

Skiing[edit]

Wineries[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Map of El Dorado County in Northern California

Public transportation[edit]

  • El Dorado Transit runs local service in Placerville and surrounding areas (as far east as Pollock Pines). Commuter service into Sacramento and Folsom is also provided.
  • BlueGo is the transit operator for the South Lake Tahoe area. Service also runs into the state of Nevada.

Airports[edit]

General aviation airports are include: Placerville Airport, Georgetown Airport, Cameron Airpark and Lake Tahoe Airport.

Crime[edit]

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates[edit]

Demographics[edit]

2011[edit]

Places by population, race, and income[edit]

2010[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 20,057
1860 20,562 2.5%
1870 10,309 −49.9%
1880 10,683 3.6%
1890 9,232 −13.6%
1900 8,986 −2.7%
1910 7,492 −16.6%
1920 6,426 −14.2%
1930 8,325 29.6%
1940 13,229 58.9%
1950 16,207 22.5%
1960 29,390 81.3%
1970 43,833 49.1%
1980 85,812 95.8%
1990 125,955 46.8%
2000 156,299 24.1%
2010 181,058 15.8%
Est. 2013 181,737 0.4%
U.S. Decennial Census[16]
1790-1960[17] 1900-1990[18]
1990-2000[19] 2010-2013[2]

The 2010 United States Census reported that El Dorado County had a population of 181,058. The racial makeup of El Dorado County was 156,793 (86.6%) White, 1,409 (0.8%) African American, 2,070 (1.1%) Native American, 6,297 (3.5%) Asian, 294 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 7,278 (4.0%) from other races, and 6,917 (3.8%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 21,875 persons (12.1%).[20] The largest growth in the county has come in El Dorado Hills where the population grew by 24,092 residents to a total of 42,108 since 2000.[20]

2000[edit]

As of the census[21] of 2000, there were 156,299 people, 58,939 households, and 43,025 families residing in the county. The population density was 91 people per square mile (35/km²). There were 71,278 housing units at an average density of 42 per square mile (16/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 89.7% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 1.0% Native American, 2.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.6% from other races, and 3.0% from two or more races. 9.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 14.9% were of German, 13.4% English, 10.3% Irish, 6.6% Italian and 6.6% American ancestry according to Census 2000. 90.5% spoke English and 6.5% Spanish as their first language.

There were 58,939 households out of which 34.2% had kids under the age of 18 living with them, 60.1% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 20.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.3 males.

The 2000 census also states that the median income for a household in the county was $51,484, and the median income for a family was $60,250. Males had a median income of $46,373 versus $31,537 for females. The per capita income for the county was $25,560. About 5.0% of families and 7.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.6% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

Voter registration statistics[edit]

Cities by population and voter registration[edit]

Overview[edit]

Presidential election results
Year GOP DEM Others
2012 57.3% 50,973 39.5% 35,166 3.2% 2,859
2008 54.1% 50,314 43.6% 40,529 2.2% 2,083
2004 61.2% 52,878 37.3% 32,242 1.4% 1,244
2000 58.3% 42,045 36.4% 26,220 5.4% 3,871
1996 51.8% 32,759 36.3% 22,957 11.8% 7,480
1992 39.9% 25,906 32.4% 21,012 27.7% 17,969
1988 59.3% 30,021 39.1% 19,801 1.5% 781
1984 64.9% 27,583 33.7% 14,312 1.4% 583
1980 58.3% 21,238 29.5% 10,765 12.2% 4,446
1976 47.7% 12,472 48.8% 12,763 3.5% 919
1972 54.2% 11,330 41.4% 8,654 4.4% 921
1968 49.0% 7,468 39.7% 6,054 11.3% 1,719
1964 39.5% 5,775 60.3% 8,810 0.2% 25
1960 49.2% 6,065 50.1% 6,175 0.8% 97
Election results from statewide races
Year Office Results
2010 Governor Whitman 56.2 - 38.6%
Lieutenant Governor Maldonado 55.6 - 32.8%
Secretary of State Dunn 53.5 - 37.4%
Controller Chiang 46.1 - 45.7%
Treasurer Walters 51.3 - 41.0%
Attorney General Cooley 60.4 - 29.4%
Insurance Commissioner Villines 53.6 - 33.8%

El Dorado is a predominantly Republican county in Presidential and congressional elections. The last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Lyndon Johnson in 1964 election, and the last Democrat to win the county was Jimmy Carter in the 1976 presidential election. The county is noted as a center of political concern with the United Nations non-binding sustainable development plan Agenda 21, which was on the County Board of Supervisors meeting Agenda on May 15, 2012. Concerns included the threat of U.S. Forest Service road closures and traffic roundabouts.[23] On February 19, 2013 14 members of the El Dorado County Grand Jury resigned, forcing Supervising Judge Steven Bailey to dissolve it.[24]

El Dorado County is in California's 4th congressional district, represented by Republican Tom McClintock.[25] In the State Assembly, the county is split between the 5th Assembly District, represented by Republican Frank Bigelow and the 6th Assembly District, represented by Republican Beth Gaines.[26] In the State Senate, it is in the 1st Senate District, represented by Republican Ted Gaines.[27]

Asbestos[edit]

Portions of El Dorado county are known to contain natural asbestos formations near the surface.[28] The USGS studied amphiboles in rock and soil in the area in response to an EPA sampling study and subsequent criticism of the EPA study. The study found that many amphibole particles in the area meet the counting rule criteria used by the EPA for chemical and morphological limits, but do not meet morphological requirements for commercial-grade-asbestos. The executive summary pointed out that even particles that do not meet requirements for commercial-grade-asbestos may be a health threat and suggested a collaborative research effort to assess health risks associated with "Naturally Occurring Asbestos".[29]

In 2003 after construction of the Oak Ridge High School (El Dorado Hills, CA) soccer field, the federal Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry found that some student athletes, coaches and school workers received substantial exposures. The inside of Oak Ridge High School needed to be cleaned of dust.[28]

Communities[edit]

El Dorado County Courthouse, Placerville

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Only larceny-theft cases involving property over $400 in value are reported as property crimes.
  2. ^ Other = Some other race + Two or more races
  3. ^ Native American = Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander + American Indian or Alaska Native
  4. ^ a b Percentage of registered voters with respect to total population. Percentages of party members with respect to registered voters follow.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Chronology". California Counties. California State Association of Counties. Retrieved 2012-05-14. 
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 25, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 116. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ Freel Peak
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B02001. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Office of the Attorney General, Department of Justice, State of California. Table 11: Crimes – 2009. Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  9. ^ a b c United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2012, Table 8 (California). Retrieved 2013-11-14.
  10. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B03003. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-26.
  11. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19301. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  12. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19013. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  13. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B19113. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  14. ^ a b U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  15. ^ U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, Table B01003. American FactFinder. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  16. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 25, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved May 25, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 25, 2014. 
  19. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 25, 2014. 
  20. ^ a b "2010 Census P.L. 94-171 Summary File Data". United States Census Bureau. 
  21. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q California Secretary of State. February 10, 2013 - Report of Registration. Retrieved 2013-10-31.
  23. ^ Carlos Alcalá (May 24, 2012). "El Dorado County folks riled by U.N. agenda for sustainable growth". Sacramento Bee. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  24. ^ Cathy Locke (March 10, 2013). "The Public Eye: El Dorado County grand jury disbands after mass resignation". Sacramento Bee. Retrieved March 10, 2013. 
  25. ^ "California's 4th Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved April 5, 2013. 
  27. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved April 5, 2013. 
  28. ^ a b Raloff, Janet (July 8, 2006), "Dirty Little Secret" (– Scholar search), Science News [dead link]
  29. ^ Meeker, G.P.; Lowers, H.A.; Swayze, G.A.; Van Gosen, B.S.; Stutley, S.J.; Brownfield, I.K. (December 2006), Mineralogy and Morphology of Amphiboles Observed in Soils and Rocks in El Dorado Hills, California, United States Geological Survey 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°47′N 120°32′W / 38.78°N 120.53°W / 38.78; -120.53