El Forastero Motorcycle Club

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El Forastero MC
El Forastero Motorcycle Club logo.jpg
Founded 1962
Location Sioux City, Iowa
Founder Tom Fugle and Harlan "Tiny" Brower
Key people David Mann
Type Outlaw motorcycle club
Region Midwestern USA
Membership 100[1]
Website www.elforasteromc.net

El Forastero Motorcycle Club (EFMC) is a one-percenter motorcycle club[2] which was established after being turned down for a chapter by the Satan Slaves MC. The El Forasteros are well known for their criminal activities, and are considered by law enforcement to be among the many second-tier, after the "Big Four" gangs, outlaw motorcycle gangs operated as organized crime enterprises.[3][4]

Its early members included the renowned biker artist Dave Mann. The name of the club means "the outsider" in Spanish.[5]

The club was founded in 1962[6][7] by Tom Fugle and Harlan "Tiny" Brower [8] has chapters in Iowa, Minnesota, Kansas, and Missouri [9] and close links to the Galloping Goose MC.[10]

Some of the club members have been found guilty for the crimes motorcycle theft [11] and for transporting and distributing methamphetamine after members testified the club members pooled money to buy narcotics for consumption at their organized events.[12][13][14][15]

El Forastero member William Eneff received a sentence of seven years in federal prison without parole after pleading guilty conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. According to the US Department of Justice, Eneff, "admitted that members of El Forastero and the affiliated Galloping Goose Motorcycle Club were required to annually pay dues and attend a certain number of motorcycle trips, known as runs, each year. On each run, the members were required to pay money that was pooled, or collected by each club charter, then forwarded to the specific Galloping Goose or El Forastero charter that hosted the particular motorcycle run in order to purchase methamphetamine, cocaine and marijuana. Those drugs were maintained in run bags, which were distributed to all club members who attended the run."[15]

An editorial by Mark Sheehan in the St. Joseph News-Press expressed wonderment at the advanced age of the "dangerous motorcycle gang", the El Forasteros, noting that among one group indicted on methamphetamine charges in 2006, "the ages of these rebels on wheels range from 51 to 60". Indicted El Forastero Larry D. "Eight Ball" Williams was at age 60 a "card-carrying member of AARP." Sheehan said, "My deepest concern is that we are stuck in a psychological rut. We are determined to live in the 1960s when motorcycle gangs were cool."[16]


References[edit]

  1. ^ Bryan Noonan (June 30, 2005), "Live Free & Die", Kansas City Pitch  Archived October 6, 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ The Pitch News Kansas City
  3. ^ Martin, Jeff (October 8, 2011), "Ganging up on motorcycle gangs", The Examiner  Archived November 10, 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Mallory, Stephen (2007), Understanding Organized Crime, p. 160, ISBN 978-0-7637-4108-2 
  5. ^ The One Percenter Encyclopedia: The World of Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs from Abyss Ghosts to Zombies Elite. Bill Hayes. MotorBooks International, 15 Dec 2011
  6. ^ KC Outlaw Bikers Archived September 27, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ David Mann Eulogy
  8. ^ Throttler Magazine Archived May 6, 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Biker News Archived April 7, 2012 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ The Assimilation: Rock Machine Become Bandidos - Bikers United Against the Hells Angels. Edward Winterhalder, Wil De Clercq. ECW Press, 1 Jun 2008
  11. ^ Chanen, David (April 9, 1998), "9 arrested in alleged motorcycle theft ring; An estimated $785, 000 worth of stolen Harley-Davidson motorcycles and parts were recovered during a half-year investigation.", Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN: Star Tribune Co.), The Hennepin County Sheriff's Department showed off an estimated $785,000 worth of stolen Harley-Davidson motorcycles and parts Wednesday that were recovered during an investigation started in September. The items were confiscated during a one-day search in February of nearly a dozen houses and storage facilities in Minneapolis, Brooklyn Center, Brooklyn Park, Crystal and New Hope. Nine men and women from the Twin Cities, including four alleged members of the Hell's Angels and El Forasteros motorcycle clubs, were arrested on probable cause for narcotics and receiving and concealing stolen goods, but none has been charged in connection with the investigation. 
  12. ^ Channen, David (April 9, 1998), "19 MOTORCYCLES, PARTS RECOVERED (AND HIDDEN) BY SHERIFF//HARLEY HOGS MOST ENTICING FOR THIEVES", St. Paul Pioneer Press (MN): 3D METRO 
  13. ^ Rizzo, Tony (October 7, 2006), "Biker gang linked to meth ring: Six members or associates of El Forastero are charged with trafficking", The Kansas City Star (Kansas City, MO), Seever said that other members of El Forastero -- which loosely means 'the outlaw' -- have been prosecuted for drugs, theft and money laundering. In a 1984 interview with The Kansas City Times, Sheaffer described himself as a "senior board member" of the club, which was founded in 1962. At the time he denied the group was involved in criminal activity. 
  14. ^ Noonan, Bryan (June 30, 2005), "Live Free & Die.After Kansas City's first generation of outlaw bikers rides off into the sunset, who will replace them?", The Pitch (Kansas City, MO: Village Voice Media), Later, though, Shifty would spend seven and a half years in prison for possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine. ('Actually, I was transporting it,' he says.)  Archived January 3, 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  15. ^ a b Motorcycle Club Member Sentenced For Meth Conspiracy, US Department of Justice, December 21, 2009  Archived May 29, 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  16. ^ "Mark Sheehan column: Danger: Psychological rut ahead", St. Joseph News-Press (General OneFile) (St. Joseph, Missouri), November 12, 2006 

External links[edit]