El Morocco

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Photo taken at the club in 1965.

El Morocco (sometimes nicknamed Elmo or Elmer) was a 20th-century Manhattan nightclub frequented by the rich and famous from the 1930s until the decline of cafe society in the late 1950s. It was famous for its blue zebra-stripe motif (designed by Vernon MacFarlane) and its official photographer, Jerome Zerbe.

History[edit]

In 1931, John Perona (born Enrione Giovanni Perona in Chiaverano in the Province of Turin, Italy),[1] an Italian immigrant, with Martín de Alzaga[2][3] opened El Morocco as a speakeasy at 154 East 54th Street, on the south side of 54th Street in the middle of the block between Lexington Avenue and Third Avenue, where the Citigroup Center now stands.

After prohibition was repealed, it became one of the most popular establishments in New York City. Its regular clientele consisted of fashionable society, politicians, and entertainers. Part of what made the club the 'place to be' was the photographs taken by Jerome Zerbe which were always in the news the next day. Everyone always knew from the background zebra stripes on the banquettes where the celebrities had been.

The neighborhood started changing after World War II, and eventually Perona moved El Morocco to a four-storey townhouse at 307 East 54th Street, on the north side of the street near the corner of Second Avenue in 1960.

Perona died in 1961, and his son, Edwin took over the proprietorship. Later that year, Edwin Perona sold the club to John Mills, who owned it for three years.[4] It was then owned by Maurice Uchitel (1964–70) and Sheldon Hazeltine.[5] Before taking over El Morocco, Uchitel owned the Eden Roc Hotel in Miami Beach for several years.[6] In 1981, the Second Avenue wing operated briefly as a steakhouse.[7][8] In 1992, it operated as a topless bar.[9] In 1997, Desmond Wootton bought the property and opened the Night Owls nightclub. The site is now occupied by the Milan Condominium.[10]

In popular culture[edit]

Notes[edit]

  • Beebe, Lucius (1967). The Lucius Beebe Reader. Charles Clegg and Duncan Emrich (eds.). New York: Doubleday. 
  • Zerbe, Jerome (1937). John Perona's El Morocco Family Album. Introduction by Lucius Beebe. New York: privately published. 
  • Zerbe, Jerome (1934). People on Parade. Introduction by Lucius Beebe. New York: D. Kemp. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New York City - Cafe Society Or Up From The Speakeasies". Oldandsold.com. Retrieved 2011-12-29. 
  2. ^ "Internet Archive Wayback Machine". Web.archive.org. 2009-10-26. Retrieved 2011-12-29. 
  3. ^ "de beste bron van informatie over pilotos muertos. Deze website is te koop!". pilotosmuertos.es. Retrieved 2011-12-29. 
  4. ^ "Nightclubs: In Old Morocco". Time. December 25, 1964. Retrieved May 1, 2010. 
  5. ^ Edwards, Joe (1986). "Hazeltine acquires N.Y.'s El Morocco; targets October reopening". Nation's Restaurant News. 
  6. ^ "Maurice Uchitel, 88, Owner of El Morocco". The New York Times. May 7, 2000. Retrieved May 1, 2010. 
  7. ^ Mimi Sheraton (20 March 1981). "East Side steak and side dishes of Japan". The New York Times. Retrieved 27 July 2014. 
  8. ^ Prial, Frank J. (April 29, 1987). "'21' And El Morocco: 2 Legends Reopen". The New York Times. Retrieved May 1, 2010. 
  9. ^ "El Morocco: Famous Sup 'n' Sip Is a Strip". The New York Times. September 27, 1992. Retrieved May 1, 2010. 
  10. ^ The Milan Condominium, New York City
  11. ^ "Elmo". The New York Times. Retrieved 27 July 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 40°45′32″N 73°58′11″W / 40.75875°N 73.96975°W / 40.75875; -73.96975