Elaine S. Edwards

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Elaine S. Edwards
Elaine Edwards (D-LA).jpg
United States Senator
from Louisiana
In office
August 1, 1972 – November 13, 1972
Appointed by Edwin Edwards
Preceded by Allen J. Ellender
Succeeded by J. Bennett Johnston, Jr.
Personal details
Born (1929-03-08) March 8, 1929 (age 85)
Marksville, Louisiana
Nationality American
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Edwin Edwards (1949-1989, divorced)
Children Anna Edwards
Victoria Edwards
Stephen Edwards
David Edwards
Religion Roman Catholic[1]

[2] [3]

Elaine Schwartzenburg Edwards (born March 8, 1929) is a former United States Senator and the first wife of Edwin Washington Edwards, making her a former First Lady of Louisiana.

Edwards was born in Marksville, the seat of Avoyelles Parish, to Errol Schwartzenburg (1909-1999)[4][5] and Myrl Dupuy Schwartzenburg (1907-2001).[6][7][8][9] She married Edwin Edwards in 1949.[10]

Elaine also had a brother, Frank,[11] and another brother, Ralph.[12]

On August 1, 1972, Edwin Edwards appointed Elaine to the U.S. Senate after the death of Allen Ellender. Edwin's reasons for appointing his wife included her willingness to resign after a new senator was elected and her agreement with his political philosophy.[13] However, during the 1976 presidential election campaign, Elaine endorsed Gerald Ford[14] over Jimmy Carter, while her husband first endorsed California governor Jerry Brown,[15] and later endorsed Carter after Brown didn't get the nomination.[16][17]

An observer said that Elaine Edwards "wanted the opposite of what Edwin wanted. She hated the fishbowl of politics."[18]

Edwin and Elaine Edwards divorced in 1989 after 40 years of marriage.[19] She is the mother of four children, including Stephen Edwards, who was convicted alongside his father in 2000, stemming from a riverboat casino licensing scheme.[20] The other three children are Anna, Victoria and David.[21]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hugh A. Mulligan. "Good time sour for La.'s Edwards". Lakeland Ledger. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Edwin Edwards Timeline". kplctv.com. KPLC 7 News. Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Coozan Dudley LeBlanc: from Huey Long to Hadacol". Retrieved 12 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Alexandria Daily Town Talk, July 17, 1999". USGenWarchives.net. 17 July 1999. Retrieved 7 January 2012. 
  5. ^ "Errol Leo Schwartzenburg". FindAGrave. 6 January 2012. Retrieved 7 January 2012. 
  6. ^ "Myrl Dupuy Schwartzenburg". FindAGrave. 6 January 2012. Retrieved 7 January 2012. 
  7. ^ "Google News Search Myrl Schwartzenburg Elaine". Google. Retrieved 7 January 2012. 
  8. ^ "Google News Search Myrl Schwartzenburg". Google. Retrieved January 7, 2012. 
  9. ^ Matthew Andrew Wasniewski, United States Congress House Committee on House Administration, United States Congress House Office of History and Preservation (2006). Women in Congress, 1917-2006. Government Printing Office. pp. 467–469. ISBN 978-0-16-076753-1. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  10. ^ Matthew Andrew Wasniewski, United States Congress House Committee on House Administration, United States Congress House Office of History and Preservation (2006). Women in Congress, 1917-2006. Government Printing Office. pp. 467–469. ISBN 978-0-16-076753-1. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  11. ^ "Frank Charles Schwartzenburg, Sr., age 84 of Marshalltown, Iowa, native of Marksville". Avoyellestoday.com. 31 January 2013. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  12. ^ Philip Timothy (16 March 2007). "Ex-governor tops list of colorful parish politicians". thetowntalk.com. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  13. ^ "Governor's wife to replace Ellender". The Milwaukee Sentinel. 2 August 1972. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  14. ^ Gerald R. Ford (1977). Public papers of the Presidents of the United States, Gerald R. Ford. Government Printing Office. pp. 2324–2325. 
  15. ^ "Carter nomination seems assured; more Dems climb on bandwagon". Eugene Register-Guard. 10 June 1976. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  16. ^ "Conservatism balances regional pride in South". The Sun. 18 October 1976. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  17. ^ "Google News Archive search edwards endorse carter ford". Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  18. ^ Leo Honeycutt, Edwin Edwards: Governor of Louisiana, Lisburn Press, 2009, p. 82
  19. ^ Matthew Andrew Wasniewski, United States Congress House Committee on House Administration, United States Congress House Office of History and Preservation (2006). Women in Congress, 1917-2006. Government Printing Office. pp. 467–469. ISBN 978-0-16-076753-1. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  20. ^ "Edwards convicted". Gadsen Times. 8 May 2000. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  21. ^ The Biographical encyclopedia of the United States, Volume 2. Allied Publishers. 1968. p. 370. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
United States Senate
Preceded by
Allen J. Ellender
U.S. Senator (Class 3) from Louisiana
1972
Served alongside: Russell B. Long
Succeeded by
J. Bennett Johnston, Jr.