Elan Lee

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Elan Lee
Elan lee tombstone.jpg
Elan Lee designing Tombstone Hold 'Em (2005) with a golf ball attached to his head
Born (1975-01-26) January 26, 1975 (age 39)
Los Angeles, California, United States
Occupation Alternate Reality Game Designer

Elan Lee (born 1975) is a game designer who works in the genre of alternate reality games.

Biography[edit]

Lee started his career as a character designer at Industrial Light and Magic, where he worked on several motion pictures. In 1998 he became lead game designer at Microsoft Game Studios, designing and directing games for the PC and Xbox. While working for Microsoft he was the lead designer for The Beast, to promote the Steven Spielberg film A.I. Artificial Intelligence.[1]

In 2003 he co-founded 42 Entertainment, a design company in the new field of alternate reality games (ARGs). 42 has created multiple ARGs, including, I Love Bees to promote the Xbox game Halo 2, and Year Zero, to promote the Nine Inch Nails album Year Zero.

In 2006, he co-founded (with Dawne Weisman) edoc laundry, a company designed to produce ARGs using clothes as the primary platform. Consumers deciphered codes hidden within garments and inputed the results into the game's main website to reveal pieces of a story about the murder of a band manager.

In 2007, he founded Fourth Wall Studios, an entertainment studio aiming to develop and publish entertainment experiences of varying scopes.[2]

In 2013, he returned to Microsoft as the Chief Design Officer for Xbox Entertainment Studios.[3]

Credits[edit]

With Microsoft:

With 42 Entertainment:

  • I Love Bees Lead Designer (2004)
  • Last Call Poker Lead Designer (2005)
  • The Vanishing Point Lead Designer (2007)
  • Year Zero Designer (2007)

Acclaim[edit]

Lee and his projects have won several industry awards for both design and marketing.

In 2005 I Love Bees won an Innovation Award from IGDA, and a Webby Award award.[citation needed]

In 2008 Year Zero won the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity Grand Prix Award for "Viral Marketing"[4] as well as a Silver Award for "Integrated Campaign".[5] The game also won a bronze Clio Award,[6] and two Webbys: Peoples Voice Award (Branded Content)[7] and Peoples Voice Award (Integrated Campaigns).[7]

In 2012 Lee won a Creative Arts Emmy for Original Interactive Programming for the web series Dirty Work.[8] The same year he won the Trailblazer Award from IndieCade.[9]

External links[edit]

Notable interviews[edit]

References[edit]