Eleanor Rae

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

BIOGRAPHY[edit]

Eleanor Rae was born in 1934 in Meriden, Connecticut. Eleanor was named after First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt with the thought that her family would survive the Great Depression. Family of Eleanor Rae Eleanor Rae is married to Giles Rae and they together have two daughters, a son, and eight grand children.[1]

EDUCATION[edit]

Eleanor Rae attended multiple colleges. She first earned a Mathematics degree from the College of New Rochelle. She then went on to earn two master's degrees. Her first was from Southern Connecticut State University in early childhood education. The second was from Fordham University in parish ministry and adult education. And finally Eleanor Rae earned her doctoral degree from Fordham University in contemporary systematic theology. Eleanor Rae has a diverse background of academics from multiple universities. Her coursework is an example of her broad range of study and academic achievements.[2] ' Work Life Eleanor Rae worked in many different types of fields. After her youngest child entered school, Eleanor worked as a day care worker, parent cooperative nursery school director, in church ministries, and a public school teacher. In her most recent position as Director of Office of the Laity for the Roman Catholic Diocese she developed an interest in women’s issues. As the director she worked directly with individuals working in their specific occupations to help with their Christian commitment.[3]

MAJOR WORKS Eleanor Rae is the author of several renown works across various realms. She co-authored the book Created in Her Image: Models of the Feminine Divine. Beginning in 1995, Rae has published a quarterly newsletter “Weaving the Connections” on various women’s issues.[4]

Created in Her Image: Models of the Feminine Divine (Summary) Eleanor Rae uses her feminist perspective, spirituality, and her social concerns to put forth a book that explains the powers of the feminist divine. The book outlines the role that psychology has played in feminism and how it will also play a role going forward.[5]

Women, the Earth, the Divine (Summary) Rae puts together three topics of concern in this 1994 novel. The novel focuses on rediscovering feminine principle that is a not a result of male view. Instead, Rae uses real world experiences from women. She ties together eco feminism with religion and relates them to real world issues. The novel examines western tendencies to ignore women's voices and peoples ability to over look women's capabilities across various subjects. Rae compares the feminine principle with four major religions, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Judaism.[6]

PHILOSOPHICAL CONTRIBUTIONS'''''''Eleanor Rae is considered a staple in eco feminist theology. She has had a focus on women’s oppression and issues around this subject her entire career. Rae is part of a group of eco feminists that contribute to social in justice and attacks philosophical theories that contribute to injustices. Eco feminism as a whole aims to connect, historically and philosophically, the idea of women’s oppression and nature’s exploitation. Eleanor Rae is credited as one of these eco feminists.[7]

What Eleanor Rae is Doing Now Eleanor Rae has always had a special spot for animals that were not people. She has done work with the pink river dolphins on the Amazon River in Peru and with the leather back turtles in Suriname. Accomplishments Eleanor Rae was awarded the Ursula Lauris citation for her leadership achievements.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Eleanor Rae - Women, Earth, the Divine http://www.women-philosophers.com/Eleanor-Rae.html. Retrieved 2013-07-26.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ "Eleanor Rae - Women, Earth, the Divine". Women-Philosophers.com. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  3. ^ "Eleanor Rae - Women, Earth, the Divine". Women-philosopers.com. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  4. ^ "Eleanor Rae - Women, Earth, the Divine". Women-Philosophers.com. Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  5. ^ . Orbis Books http://www.amazon.com/Women-Earth-Divine-Ecology-Justice/dp/0883449528/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374865491&sr=1-2&keywords=women%2C+the+earth%2C+the+divine. Retrieved 2013-07-26.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ . Orbis Books http://www.amazon.com/Women-Earth-Divine-Ecology-Justice/dp/0883449528/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374865491&sr=1-2&keywords=women%2C+the+earth%2C+the+divine. Retrieved 2013-07-26.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ "An Orthodox Christian Response to Ecofeminist Theological Claims". Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  8. ^ Eleanor Rae - Women, Earth, the Divine http://www.women-philosophers.com/Eleanor-Rae.html. Retrieved 2013-07-26.  Missing or empty |title= (help)