Elections in Illinois

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Election law[edit]

In the case of a resignation of a member of the United States House of Representatives, the Governor of Illinois must issue writs of election, and the election must be held within 115 days thereafter.[1]

Election judges[edit]

Illinois High School Student Election Judges[edit]

High School students in many states across the country are permitted to serve as Election Judges or Poll Workers in their states, even when the students are not yet old enough to vote. In the 41 states that allow high school students to serve as Election Judges, the laws typically allow for students to work if they are 16 years of age and in good academic standing at their schools. Specific requirements vary from state to state. Some states do not allow high school students to serve as Election Judges, or the law has no specific provisions for persons who are not yet eligible to vote. The following states permit high school students to serve as Election Judges:[2] Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas,California,Colorado,Connecticut,Delaware,District of Columbia, Georgia, Guam, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

The State of Illinois, specifically Chicago, has a robust model. Chicago’s contingencies of student judges are the largest in the country. Illinois law[3] provided that students meet the following criteria to serve as Election Judges:

  • Be a high school junior or senior in good standing;
  • Have a grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale;
  • Be a U.S. citizen by Election Day;
  • Be able to read, write, and speak English;
  • Successfully complete a 4-hour training session;
  • Be able to work on Election Day beginning at 5 a.m. until all duties are completed after the polls close;
  • Be recommended by his/her high school principal;
  • Have the written approval of his/her parent or legal guardian.,[4][5]

There is no minimum age requirement to serve as a student election judge in Illinois. A maximum of two high school students, 1 from each party, may serve in each precinct.[6] In the City of Chicago, a partnership between the Chicago Board of Elections and Mikva Challenge, a non-partisan civic engagement organization, has contributed to the Election Board leading the nation in the utilization of student judges.[7]

Offices affected[edit]

Statewide elections
Local elections
Elected officials
Topical articles

References[edit]

  1. ^ 10 ILCS 5/25-7 Election Law; Illinois Government;
  2. ^ State Profiles; American Education EDU;
  3. ^ SB0387s; regarding "Election Judge HS Seniors"; passed on July 29, 1999.
  4. ^ article; Chicago Elections on line.
  5. ^ Legislation; Illinois Government.
  6. ^ Student Eection Judges; Cook County Clerk website; .
  7. ^ Mikva Challenge; organization website; .

External links[edit]