Elections in Pichilemu

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Pichilemu municipal election, 2012
Pichilemu
2008 ←
8 October 2012 (2012-10-08)
→ 2013

  Washington Araneda crop.jpg Roberto Córdova, November 2010 (cropped).jpg Carlos Acuña crop.jpg
Candidate Washington Araneda Carrasco Roberto Córdova Carreño Carlos Acuña Arévalo
Party Progressist Party Socialist National Renewal
Alliance El Cambio por Tí Concertación Coalition for Change
Popular vote 178 3,507 1,492
Percentage 2.49 49.13 20.90

  Mario Moraga 2.jpg Cristián Tamayo crop.jpg Iván Cabrera Martínez.jpg
Candidate Mario Moraga Cáceres Cristián Tamayo Latapiat Iván Cabrera Martínez
Party Independent Independent Independent
Popular vote 469 153 1,339
Percentage 6.57 2.14 18.76

Mayor before election

Roberto Córdova Carreño
Socialist

Elected Mayor

Roberto Córdova Carreño
Socialist

This is a list of elections in Pichilemu, since the Chilean transition to democracy in 1989. Seventeen elections have occurred since then, including five municipal ones, and two special elections in 2009 and in 2012, with the first being held in the Pichilemu City Council, which elected Roberto Córdova Carreño as mayor of the city, succeeding Marcelo Cabrera Martínez, elected in 2008, but held office for a short period of time.

Presidential elections[edit]

Presidential election, 1989[edit]

Patricio Aylwin defeated Hernán Büchi and "Fra Fra" Errázuriz, and became the first president of Chile since the military regime.

The presidential election of 1989 was held on that year's 14 December. There were three candidates: Hernán Büchi Buc, representing Democracy and Progress, currently known as the Alliance for Chile; Francisco Javier Errázuriz Talavera, founding member of the Progressive Union of the Centrist Center (UCC); and Patricio Aylwin Azócar, member of the Christian Democrat Party from the Concert of Parties for Democracy (Concertación).[1][2]

The 1989 elections were the first since the Chilean transition to democracy,[1] after a national plebiscite decided that the military regime of Augusto Pinochet should not continue, and that a president and a congress would be elected.[1]

Patricio Aylwin was eventually elected president of Chile with a 55.17 per cent of the total valid votes, an absolute majority;[2] in Pichilemu, Aylwin obtained a lesser percentage: 46.23; despite of this, he got the majority of votes. Despite Francisco Javier Errázuriz's presence in Pichilemu —he is the proprietary of 500-year old hacienda San Antonio de Petrel—,[3] he was left in second place in the local results with the 33.03 per cent of the vote; Hernán Büchi obtained only the 20.75 per cent of the vote in Pichilemu.[4]

Presidential election, 1993[edit]

Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle (pictured) obtained the absolute majority both in the national and local elections.

The second Chilean presidential election since the military regime of Augusto Pinochet ended was held on 11 December 1993.[6] The President elected in this election would hold the office between 1994 and 2000.[7]

There were six candidates for the presidency of Chile: Manfred Max-Neef, from the Ecologist Party (PE); Eugenio Pizarro Poblete, a Catholic priest, member of the Communist Party (PCCh); Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle, son of former president Eduardo Frei Montalva, member of the Christian Democrat Party (PDC) of the Concert of Parties for Democracy (Concertación); Cristián Reitze Campos, of the Humanist Party; Arturo Alessandri Besa, of the Alessandri family (grandson of former President Arturo Alessandri Palma and nephew of his son, also former President Jorge Alessandri Rodríguez), member of the Independent Democrat Union; and José Piñera Echenique, brother of President of Chile Sebastián Piñera, as independent.[8]

The elections were won by Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle, who obtained the absolute majority in the national elections, getting 57.98 per cent of the total valid votes;[8] in Pichilemu, he obtained an even larger percentage: 65.56%.[9]

Presidential election, 1999–2000[edit]

Both Joaquín Lavín (left) and Ricardo Lagos (right) obtained around a 47 per cent of the votes; however, in the runoff election, Lagos won.

The third presidential election since 1989 took place on 12 December 1999. As Joaquín Lavín, candidate of the Alianza por Chile, and Ricardo Lagos, candidate of the Concertación de Partidos por la Democracia obtained nationally an absolute majority (each achieved about a 47 per cent), there was a runoff election on 16 January 2000; Lagos became the President-elect of Chile, being elected nationally with a 51.31 per cent of the votes. Ricardo Lagos was sworn in on 11 March 2000.[11]

There were, originally, two candidates representing the Concertación. Lagos, of the Socialist Party (PS), faced open primaries against Andrés Zaldívar, from the Christian Democrat Party (PDC). Lagos eventually won the national open primaries. On the other side, Lavín, member of the Independent Democrat Union (UDI) was the most popular candidate in the Alianza; previously, he had been mayor of Las Condes, and would become after the elections mayor of Santiago (elected in 2000), taking some "extravagant" measures such as creating a beach on the banks of the Mapocho River.[12]

First round, 1999

The first round of the 1999 presidential election was held on that year's 12 December.[11] There were six candidates in the election: Arturo Frei Bolívar, from the Progressive Union of the Centrist Center (UCC); Sara Larraín Ruiz-Tagle, an independent politician; Gladys Marín Millie, from the Communist Party of Chile (PCCh); Tomás Hirsch Goldschmidt, of the Humanist Party of Chile (PH); Ricardo Lagos Escobar, of the Socialist Party of Chile (PS); and Joaquín Lavín Infante, from the Independent Democrat Union (UDI).[13]

Together, Frei, Larraín, Marín, and Hirsch would received about a 4 per cent of the votes, while Ricardo Lagos and Joaquín Lavín received each a 47 per cent.[13] As none of the candidates achieved an absolute majority nationally, a runoff election was scheduled.[11]

In Pichilemu, the results were similar to the national scene, though not exactly the same: Frei, Larraín, Marín, and Hirsch together got about a 4 per cent; Joaquín Lavín achieved a 44.77 per cent of the vote; Ricardo Lagos, the Concertación candidate, obtained a 52.55 per cent of the vote, an absolute majority.[14]

Runoff, 2000

The runoff election took place on 16 January 2000; Ricardo Lagos of the Concert of Parties for Democracy faced the runoff against Joaquín Lavín of the Alliance for Chile.[11] The final results were clear, nationally: Lagos obtained a 51.31 percent of the votes; while Lavín, only the 48.69.[16] The results in Pichilemu were even more favourable to Lagos: he obtained a 53.22 per cent of vote; whilst Lavín only the 46.78 per cent.[17]

Presidential election, 2005–2006[edit]

Michelle Bachelet, President of Chile elected in 2006, with Mayor of Pichilemu Roberto Córdova in 2010.

The fourth presidential election in Chile since the return to democracy was held on 11 December 2005. As none of the candidates obtained the required absolute majority, Alianza candidate Sebastián Piñera Echenique faced a runoff election on 16 January 2006 against Concertación candidate Michelle Bachelet Jeria, who ultimately won the election with 53.50 per cent of the vote, against Piñera's 46.50%.[19] Bachelet became the first woman to be elected president in Chile, and took office on 11 March 2006.[20]

Four candidates competed for the Chilean presidential seat: Michelle Bachelet Jeria, from the Socialist Party (PS) and representing the center-left Concertación de Partidos por la Democracia, former Minister of Health and Defense under Ricardo Lagos;[20] Joaquín Lavín Infante, former mayor of the communes of Las Condes and Santiago and member of the Independent Democrat Union (UDI),[21] along with Sebastián Piñera Echenique, Senator of Santiago in the 1990s and president of the National Renewal party,[22] represented the center-right Alianza por Chile; Tomás Hirsch Goldschmidt, former Chile's ambassador to New Zealand, represented the Humanist Party from the far-left Juntos Podemos Más coalition of parties.[23]

Initially, the Concertación had two candidates for president: Bachelet and Soledad Alvear, from the Christian Democrat Party (PDC). Alvear was Minister of the Women National Service under the government of Patricio Aylwin, Minister of Justice under Frei, and Minister of Foreign Affairs under Lagos. Her nomination was opposed by Adolfo Zaldívar, president of her party. Primary elections were scheduled for July 2005 to define a sole candidate of the Concertación; however, they did not take place as Alvear renounced her candidacy in May.[19] The candidacy of two Alianza politicians, Piñera and Lavín, is explained in Chacho Álvarez and Isidoro Cheresky book Elecciones Presidenciales y Giro Político en América Latina (Presidential Election and Politician Spin in Latin America) because of "the political differences between both parties [Independent Democrat Union and National Renewal], as UDI leaders had an active participation [in the government] under the military regime, while the RN influence was minor."[19]

First round, 2005
Runoff, 2006

Presidential election, 2009–2010[edit]

First round, 2009
Runoff, 2010

Presidential election, 2013[edit]

Primaries, June

Parliamentary elections[edit]

Parliamentary election, 1989[edit]

Parliamentary election, 1993[edit]

Parliamentary election, 1997[edit]

Parliamentary election, 2001[edit]

Parliamentary election, 2005[edit]

Parliamentary election, 2009[edit]

Juan Carlos Latorre (right) of the Christian Democrat Party of Chile, was re-elected as deputy in this election.

Municipal elections[edit]

Municipal election, 1992[edit]

Carlos Yáñez, principal of Charly's School, was a candidate in the 1992 elections.

Municipal election, 1996[edit]

Municipal election, 2000[edit]

Municipal election, 2004[edit]

Municipal election, 2008[edit]

Political propaganda of candidate for mayor of Pichilemu Fortunato Bobadilla Acevedo

Municipal election, 2012[edit]

Other elections[edit]

City council's mayor election, 2009[edit]

The members of the Pichilemu City Council elected fellow councilor Roberto Córdova (pictured) as the successor of Marcelo Cabrera as mayor of the city.

On 1 September 2009, an extraordinary meeting of the Pichilemu City Council, then composed by councilors Juan Cornejo Vargas from the Regionalist Party of the Independents (PRI), Aldo Polanco Contreras and Viviana Parraguez Ulloa, both from the National Renewal party (RN), Marta Urzúa Púa and Roberto Córdova Carreño from the Socialist Party (PS), and Andrea Aranda Escudero from the Party for Democracy (PPD), was held to elect the successor of Marcelo Cabrera Martínez, who was elected mayor in October 2008 but was banned from holding political offices for seven years in February 2009, in a case known as Boletas Adulteradas.[49]

The meeting was presided by Roberto Córdova Carreño and lasted seven minutes. The councilors elected him as the next mayor with four votes. Both Aldo Polanco and Viviana Parraguez obtained one vote, given by themselves.[50]

Córdova's former office as councilor was left vacant until mid-October of that year, when the Regional Electoral Court (Tribunal Electoral Regional, TER) appointed Patricio Morales Acevedo,[51] an independent candidate for councilor, supported by the Socialist Party (PS), in the 2008 municipal election. Morales obtained 108 votes (1.52%) in that election.[46] The process of appointment was reportedly delayed by an unsuccessful complaint to that court by Alfonso Aravena González, another 2008 candidate for councilor who represented the Christian Democrat Party (DC) in that occasion, who said the office should "correspond to him" as he obtained 164 votes (2.30%) votes in the election of the previous year.[51] Morales took office as councilor of Pichilemu on 16 October 2009 during a meeting of the city council.[51] The results of the election that chose Córdova as Cabrera's successor, according to Pichilemu News, are the following:

Concertación municipal primaries, 2012[edit]

The elections were held at Digna Camilo Aguilar School.

Primary elections were held on 1 April 2012 in order to choose a unique candidate for mayor representing the Concertación de Partidos por la Democracia coalition of left-winged parties for the municipal elections on 28 October 2012. Anyone inscribed in the poll registry before 30 November 2011 and without membership in non-Concertación parties could participate in the election.[52]

Incumbent mayor Roberto Córdova (Socialist Party) faced incumbent councillor Andrea Aranda (Party for Democracy) in the election. Aranda was particularly criticized by local news media Pichilemu News as "being coincidentally the wife of former Christian Democrat mayor Jorge Vargas González (condemned by justice for the crime of bribery and the presentation of false witnesses), and who is –much to his regret– disallowed to continue [participating] in active politics, for now, but has the relief of the one following his steps."[53] Provincial-newspaper El Expreso de la Costa qualified the election as "historic." Córdova's slogan was "Pichilemu, better every day" ("Pichilemu, cada día mejor"), while Aranda's was "With woman's strength" ("Con fuerza de mujer").[54]

According to reports by local radio station Entre Olas, the voting process was done in absolute normality, except for the appearance of a van painted with slogans such as "No more robbers at the Municipality" ("No más ladrones al municipio"), "Open your eyes" ("Abre tus ojos"), and "Don't sell yourself" ("No te vendas"); subsequently the owner of the van had a heated argument with former mayor Jorge Vargas González (as mentioned previously, Aranda's husband), blaming him for "discrediting Pichilemu."[55]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Spooner, Mary Helen (1994). Soldiers in a narrow land: the Pinochet regime in Chile. University of California Press. pp. 254–255. ISBN 978-0-520-08083-6. Retrieved 2 June 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Siavelis, Peter; Morgenstern, Scott (2008). Pathways to power: political recruitment and candidate selection in Latin America. Penn State Press. pp. 245–247. ISBN 978-0-271-03375-4. Retrieved 2 June 2011. 
  3. ^ "Chorean 50 palos desde fundo de Fra Fra". La Cuarta (in Spanish) (COPESA). 12 December 2004. Archived from the original on 7 March 2013. Retrieved 2 March 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Presidencial 1989" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  5. ^ "Votación País Presidencial 1989" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  6. ^ IFES (1993). Elections Today. IFES. p. 12. Retrieved 4 June 2011. 
  7. ^ Castillo-Feliú, Guillermo I. (2000). Culture and customs of Chile. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 21. ISBN 978-0-313-30783-6. Retrieved 4 June 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Siavelis, Peter; Morgenstern, Scott (2008). Pathways to power: political recruitment and candidate selection in Latin America. Penn State Press. pp. 247–249. ISBN 978-0-271-03375-4. Retrieved 4 June 2011. 
  9. ^ a b "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Presidencial 1993" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  10. ^ "Votación País Presidencial 1993" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  11. ^ a b c d Castillo-Feliú, Guillermo I. (2000). Culture and customs of Chile. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 22. ISBN 978-0-313-30783-6. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 
  12. ^ Siavelis, Peter; Morgenstern, Scott (2008). Pathways to power: political recruitment and candidate selection in Latin America. Penn State Press. pp. 250–251. ISBN 978-0-271-03375-4. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 
  13. ^ a b "Votación País Presidencial 1ª v 1999" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 5 February 2012. Retrieved 6 June 2011. 
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  17. ^ a b "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Presidencial 2ª v 1999" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  18. ^ "Votación País Presidencial 2° v 1999" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  19. ^ a b c Álvarez, Checho; Cheresky, Isidoro (2007). Elecciones Presidenciales y Giro Político en América Latina (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: Ediciones Manantial SRL. p. 67–93; 335. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  20. ^ a b "Biografías de Líderes Políticos CIDOB: Michelle Bachelet Jeria". Fundació CIDOB (in Spanish). 9 March 2007. Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  21. ^ Chapochnik, Michelle (29 July 2012). "La reinvención de Lavín". La Tercera (Santiago, Chile: COPESA). Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  22. ^ Riffo M., José Luis (20 January 2010). "Sebastián Piñera: Su periodo como senador". Library of the National Congress of Chile. Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
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  24. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Presidencial 1ª v 2005" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  25. ^ "Votación País Presidencial 1° v 2005" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  26. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Presidencial 2ª v 2005" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  27. ^ "Votación País Presidencial 2° v 2005" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 3 March 2013. Retrieved 3 March 2013. 
  28. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Presidencial 1ª v 2009" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  29. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Presidencial 2ª v 2009" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  30. ^ a b "Más resultados primarias 2013". El Cóndor (in Spanish) (Santa Cruz, Chile). 5 July 2013. p. 3. 
  31. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Senadores 1989" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
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  34. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Senadores 1997" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  35. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Diputados 1997" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
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  38. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Diputados 2005" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
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  40. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Municipales 1992" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 1 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  41. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Municipales 1996" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 6 March 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  42. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Municipales 2000" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 30 July 2012. Retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  43. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Alcaldes 2004" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 30 July 2012. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  44. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Concejales 2004" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 1 March 2012. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  45. ^ "Votación Candidatos por Comuna Pichilemu Alcaldes 2008" (in Spanish). Chile: Ministry of the Interior and Public Security. Archived from the original on 6 March 2012. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
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  47. ^ "Resultados Municipales 2012 Alcaldes" (in Spanish). Chile: Servicio Electoral. Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  48. ^ "Resultados Municipales 2012 Concejales" (in Spanish). Chile: Servicio Electoral. Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 7 February 2013. 
  49. ^ a b Saldías, Washington (1 September 2009). "Alcalde titular "habemus" en Pichilemu: Roberto Córdova Carreño elegido tras resolución del Tricel". Pichilemu News (in Spanish) (Pichilemu. Chile). Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  50. ^ "Con 4 votos a favor Roberto Córdova (PS) se convierte en el nuevo alcalde de Pichilemu". El Cachapoal (in Spanish) (Pichilemu). 1 September 2009. Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 1 April 2012. 
  51. ^ a b c Saldías, Washington (16 October 2009). "Patricio Morales asumió como concejal de Pichilemu, llenando cupo dejado por el ex concejal Córdova, hoy alcalde titular". Pichilemu News (in Spanish) (Pichilemu. Chile). Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 23 May 2011. 
  52. ^ Saldías, Washington (31 March 2012). "Ciudadanía definirá este domingo los candidatos de la Concertación para las municipales". Pichilemu News (in Spanish) (Pichilemu). Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 1 April 2012. 
  53. ^ Saldías, Washington (5 February 2012). "Pichilemu: partió carrera municipal para acceder a la alcaldía y al concejo". Pichilemu News (in Spanish) (Pichilemu). Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 1 April 2012. 
  54. ^ Calderón, Félix (16 March 2012). "El Expreso de la Costa Marzo 2012". El Expreso de la Costa (in Spanish) (Cardenal Caro Province). pp. 1, 4–5. Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 1 April 2012. 
  55. ^ Saldías, Washington (2 April 2012). "Alcalde Roberto Córdova 1903 votos, concejal Andrea Aranda 729 votos en primarias de la Concertación". Pichilemu News (in Spanish) (Pichilemu). Archived from the original on 2 March 2013. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 
  56. ^ "Resultados Preliminares Primarias Concertación 2012" (in Spanish). Concertación de Partidos por la Democracia. 2 April 2012. p. 4. Archived from the original on 4 May 2012. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 

See also[edit]