Electoral history of Richard Nixon

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President Richard Nixon

Electoral history of Richard Nixon, 37th President of the United States (1969–1974), 36th Vice President of the United States (1953–1961); United States Senator (1950–1953) and United States Representative (1947–1950) from California.

U.S. House election[edit]

California's 12th congressional district election, 1946
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Nixon 65,586 56%
Democratic Jerry Voorhis 49,994 42.7%
Prohibition John Hoeppel 1,476 1.3%
1948 Democratic Primary, U.S. House election, California Congressional District 12
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Richard Nixon 21,411 52.2%
Democratic Stephen Zetterberg 16,808 41%
Democratic Margaret Cooper 2,772 6.8%

Nixon ran unopposed in the 1948 Republican primary.

1948 U.S. House election, California Congressional District 12
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Nixon '141,509' '86.9'%
Independent Una Rice 19,631 12%
Independent Scattering 1,667 1%

U.S. Senate election[edit]

United States Senate election in California, 1950 Democratic Primary
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Helen Gahagan Douglas 734,842 47%
Democratic Manchester Boddy 379,077 24.2%
Democratic Richard Nixon 318,840 20.4%
Democratic Earl Desmond 96,752 6.2%
Democratic Ulysses Meyer 34,707 2.2%
United States Senate election in California, 1950 Republican Primary
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Nixon 740,465 64.6%
Republican Manchester Boddy 156,884 13.7%
Republican Helen Gahagan Douglas 153,788 13.4%
Republican Earl Desmond 60,613 5.3%
Republican Ulysses Meyer 18,783 1.6%
Republican Albert Levitt 15,929 1.4%
United States Senate election in California, 1950
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Richard Nixon '2,183,454' '59.2'%
Democratic Helen Gahagan Douglas 1,502,507 40.8%

1952 Presidential election[edit]

1952 Republican National Convention (Vice Presidential tally):[1]

United States presidential election, 1952

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Pct Vice-presidential candidate Home state Elect. vote
Dwight David Eisenhower Republican New York[2] 34,075,529 55.2% 442 Richard Milhous Nixon California 442
Adlai Ewing Stevenson II Democratic Illinois 27,375,090 44.3% 89 John Jackson Sparkman Alabama 89
Vincent Hallinan Progressive California 140,746 0.2% 0 Charlotta Bass New York 0
Stuart Hamblen Prohibition Texas 73,412 0.1% 0 Enoch Holtwick Illinois 0
Douglas MacArthur Constitution Arkansas 17,205 0.0% 0 Harry Byrd Virginia 0
Other 87,165 0.1% Other
Total 61,769,147 100% 531 531
Needed to win 266 266

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1952 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 1, 2005).Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 1, 2005).

1956 Presidential election[edit]

1956 Republican National Convention (Vice Presidential tally):[3]

United States presidential election, 1956:

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Pct Vice-presidential candidate Home state Elect. vote
Dwight David Eisenhower Republican Pennsylvania[4] 35,579,180 57.4% 457 Richard Milhous Nixon California 457
Adlai Ewing Stevenson II Democratic Illinois 26,028,028 42.0% 73 (Carey) Estes Kefauver Tennessee 73
Walter Burgwyn Jones Democratic Alabama (a) (a) 1 Herman Talmadge Georgia 1
(unpledged electors) (n/a) (n/a) 196,145 0.3% 0 (n/a) (n/a) 0
T. Coleman Andrews States' Rights Virginia 107,929 0.2% 0 Thomas Werdel California 0
Other 110,046 0.2% Other
Total 62,021,328 100% 531 531
Needed to win 266 266

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1956 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 1, 2005).Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 1, 2005).

1960 Presidential election[edit]

1960 Republican presidential primaries:[5]

1960 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):[6]

United States presidential election, 1960:

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Pct Vice-presidential candidate Home state Elect. vote
John Fitzgerald Kennedy Democratic Massachusetts 34,220,984(a) 49.7% 303 Lyndon Baines Johnson Texas 303
Richard Milhous Nixon Republican California 34,108,157 49.6% 219 Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. Massachusetts 219
Harry Flood Byrd (none) Virginia (b) (b) 15 James Strom Thurmond South Carolina 14
Barry Morris Goldwater(c) Arizona 1(c)
(unpledged electors) Democratic (n/a) 286,359 0.4% (d) (n/a) (n/a) (d)
Orval Faubus States' Rights Arkansas 44,984 0.1% 0 John G. Crommelin Alabama 0
Charles Sullivan Constitution Mississippi (TX) 18,162 0.0% 0 Merritt Curtis California 0
Other 216,982 0.3% Other
Total 68,895,628 100% 537 537
Needed to win 269 269

There were 537 electoral votes, up from 531 in 1956, because of the addition of 2 U.S. Senators and 1 U.S. Representative from each of the new states of Alaska and Hawaii. (The House of Representatives was temporarily expanded from 435 members to 437 to accommodate this, and would go back to 435 when reapportioned according to the 1960 census.) Source (Popular Vote):Leip, David. 1960 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (February 7, 2008).Note: Sullivan / Curtis ran only in Texas. In Washington, Constitution Party ran Curtis for President and B. N. Miller for vice-president, receiving 1,401 votes. Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 2, 2005).(a) This figure is problematic; see Alabama popular vote above.
(b) Byrd was not directly on the ballot. Instead, his electoral votes came from unpledged Democratic electors and a faithless elector.
(c) Oklahoma faithless elector Henry D. Irwin, though pledged to vote for Richard Nixon and Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr., instead voted for non-candidate Harry F. Byrd. However, unlike other electors who voted for Byrd and Strom Thurmond as Vice President, Irwin voted for Barry Goldwater as Vice President.
(d) In Mississippi, the slate of unpledged Democratic electors won. They cast their 8 votes for Byrd and Thurmond.

1962 California gubernatorial election[edit]

1962 gubernatorial election, California
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Pat Brown 3,037,109 51.94%
Republican Richard Nixon 2,740,351 46.87%
Prohibition Robert L. Wyckoff 69,700 1.19%
Totals 5,929,602 100.00%

1964 Presidential election[edit]

1964 Republican presidential primaries:[7]

1968 Presidential election[edit]

1968 Republican presidential primaries:[8]

1968 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):

United States presidential election, 1968:

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Pct Vice-presidential candidate Home state Elect. vote
Richard Milhous Nixon Republican New York[9] 31,783,783 43.4% 301 Spiro Theodore Agnew Maryland 301
Hubert Horatio Humphrey Democratic Minnesota 31,271,839 42.7% 191 Edmund Sixtus Muskie Maine 191
George Corley Wallace American Independent Alabama 9,901,118 13.5% 46 Curtis Emerson LeMay California[10] 46
Eugene McCarthy Independent Minnesota 25,634 0.0% 0 (None) 0
Other 243,258 0.3% Other
Total 73,199,998 100% 538 538
Needed to win 270 270

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1968 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 7, 2005). Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 7, 2005).

1972 Presidential election[edit]

1972 Republican presidential primaries:[11]

1972 Republican National Convention (Presidential tally):[12]

New York Conservative Party presidential convention, 1972:[13]

Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Pct Vice-presidential candidate Home state Elect. vote
Richard Milhous Nixon Republican California 47,168,710 60.7% 520 Spiro Theodore Agnew Maryland 520
George Stanley McGovern Democratic South Dakota 29,173,222 37.5% 17 Robert Sargent Shriver Maryland 17
John G. Hospers Libertarian California 3,674 0.0% 1(a) Theodora Nathan Oregon 1(a)
John G. Schmitz American Independent California 1,100,868 1.4% 0 Thomas J. Anderson Tennessee 0
Linda Jenness Socialist Workers Georgia 83,380(b) 0.1% 0 Andrew Pulley Illinois 0
Benjamin Spock People's California 78,759 0.1% 0 Julius Hobson District of Columbia 0
Other 135,414 0.2% Other
Total 77,744,027 100% 538 538
Needed to win 270 270

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1972 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 7, 2005). Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 7, 2005). (a)A Virginia faithless elector, Roger MacBride, though pledged to vote for Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew, instead voted for Libertarian candidates John Hospers and Theodora Nathan.
(b)In Arizona, Pima and Yavapai counties had a ballot malfunction that counted many votes for both a major party candidate and Linda Jenness of the Socialist Workers Party. A court ordered that the ballots be counted for both. As a consequence, Jenness received 16% and 8% of the vote in Pima and Yavapai, respectively. 30,579 of her 30,945 Arizona votes are from those two counties. Some sources do not count these votes for Jenness.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Our Campaigns - US Vice President - R Convention Race - Jul 07, 1952
  2. ^ Although he was born in Texas and grew up in Kansas before his military career, at the time of his election Eisenhower was president of Columbia University and was, officially, a New York resident. During his first term as president, he moved his private residence to Gettysburg and officially changed his residency to Pennsylvania.
  3. ^ Our Campaigns - US Vice President - R Convention Race - Aug 20, 1956
  4. ^ There is some confusion about Eisenhower's home state in this election. Both [Leip] and the National Archives give Eisenhower's home state as New York, his state of residence when he was first elected in 1952. There are strong reasons to believe that these two sources are erroneous for 1956: The National Archives cites the Senate Manual as a source, and the Senate Manual has Eisenhower's home state as Pennsylvania. The brief description for the book Republican Party National Convention (26th : 1956 : San Francisco) in the Library of Congress' online catalog refers to “Dwight D. Eisenhower of Pennsylvania”. Finally, the Maryland Manual has Eisenhower residing in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.
  5. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - R Primaries Race - Feb 01, 1960
  6. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - R Convention Race - Jul 25, 1960
  7. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - R Primaries Race - Feb 01, 1964
  8. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - D Primaries Race - Mar 12, 1968
  9. ^ Although he was born in California and he served as a US Senator from California, in 1968 Richard Nixon's official state of residence was New York, having moved there to practice law after his defeat in the 1962 California gubernatorial election. During his first term as president, Nixon re-establlished his residency in California. Consequently, most reliable reference books list Nixon's home state as New York in the 1968 election and his home state as California in the 1972 (and 1960) election.
  10. ^ "Electoral Votes for President and Vice President". Senate Manual. Government Printing Office. 2005. Retrieved 2006-03-14. 
  11. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - R Primaries Race - Mar 07, 1972
  12. ^ Our Campaigns - US President - R Convention Race - Aug 21, 1972
  13. ^ Our Campaigns - NY US President - C Convention Race - Aug 30, 1972