Visa policy of Australia

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Australia Higher Education Sector Visa (subclass 573).jpg
Australian student visa.
Australia Entry Stamp Hensley.png
Australia coolangatta exit 2.JPG
Entry and exit stamps.

A foreign national wishing to enter Australia must obtain a visa unless he or she is

In addition to the citizens of 45 eVisitor and ETA eligible countries and the citizens of New Zealand who may need to apply for a Visitor visa, the citizens of further 79 eligible countries may apply for the Visitor visa online.

Citizens of 34 countries are officially considered low risk.[2]

Visa policy map[edit]

  Australia
  eVisitor
  ETA visa
  Electronic Visitor visa

Reciprocity issues[edit]

Whilst citizens of all Member States of the European Union and Schengen associated countries are entitled to use the eVisitor system since 27 October 2008, the European Commission is still assessing whether the eVisitor visa fully satisfies reciprocity requirements. In its Seventh report on certain third countries' maintenance of visa requirements in breach of the principle of reciprocity from 2012, the European Commission found that in principle, the eVisitor provides equal treatment of the citizens of all Member States and Schengen associated countries. However, while the average autogrant rate was high (86,36 %), the quarterly reports on eVisitor application statistics showed that applications by citizens of some Member States are mainly processed manually. Autogrant rates for Bulgaria and Romania were at just 18% and 23%, as the majority of applications were sent for additional examination. The Commission therefore engaged to continue to closely monitor the processing of eVisitor applications. The Commission would submit its assessment of whether eVisitor is equivalent to the Schengen visa application process in a separate document in parallel with the assessment of the Final Rule on ESTA.[3] Currently the Schengen Area does not have visa requirements in place for short-term stays of Australian nationals.[4][5] The United Kingdom and Ireland are exempt from this particular EU policy, but still do not impose any short-term visa requirements on Australians.[6][7]

In 2014 Bulgaria, Cyprus and Romania notified the European Commission that they consider Australia requires a visa for their citizens.[8] Implications are that if the notification is accepted the EU may suspend the visa exemption for certain categories of Australian nationals and at the latest six months after publication of the regulation, the Commission may decide to suspend the visa-free access to all Australian citizens.[9]

Some countries regard the ETA as being equivalent to visa-free travel when deciding whether to grant the same to Australians wishing to enter their territory. The United States, for example, offers their Visa Waiver Program to Australian passport-holders,[10] and one of the conditions for joining this scheme is that "Governments provide reciprocal visa-free travel for U.S. citizens for 90 days for tourism or business purposes".[11] However, United States require from January 2009 similar ETA from citizens of Australia and some more countries. This system is not called visa, but Electronic System for Travel Authorization, therefore the USA still allows visa-free travel for Australians. As of December 1998, Japan has also granted visa-free access to Australians.[12] Other ETA eligible countries and territories Canada,[13] Hong Kong,[14] Malaysia,[15] Singapore[16] and South Korea (90 days)[17] and Taiwan (30 days)[18] also grant visa-free access to Australians while Brunei grants Australians a 30 day visa on arrival.[19]

Future[edit]

In 2014 Australia announced that among the countries discussed for visa waiver extension are the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.[20]

Electronic Visas[edit]

eVisitor and Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) are authorisations for entry to Australia available to holders of certain passports. Established in 1996 to remove the need for some people to apply for full visas, they can be applied for online, or in certain ETA cases through travel agents, airlines, specialist service providers or Australian visa offices. Electronic tourist visas (class 600) are processed by Australian visa offices and consulates outside Australia but the citizens of certain countries can apply online and their applications, if a requested period of stay is three months or less, and no further information or checking is required, may be granted in a matter of minutes. In other cases, the application will be manually processed by a case officer.[21]

eVisitor (Subclass 651)[edit]

The eVisitor was introduced on 27 October 2008, replacing an older eVisa system in order to deliver on the commitment between the Australian Government and the European Commission to introduce reciprocal short stay travel arrangements for their nationals, while still maintaining the universal visa system. On 23 March 2013 the business and tourist purposes eVisitors were merged into a single application.[22][23] The eVisitor is available to citizens of all[24] 28 European Union member states and 8 other European countries that are affiliated with the Schengen Area. The eVisitor visa is issued free of charge and allows a stay of up to 3 months at a time in a 12 month period for tourism or business purposes. At the time of travel to, and entry into, Australia, all holders of an eVisitor must be free from tuberculosis and must not have any criminal convictions for which the sentence or sentences (whether served or not) total 12 months or more.[22]

Citizen holders of the following passports are eligible:[25]

The grant rate of eVisitor has been consistently high over the years, never dropping below 98.9%. In first quarter of 2014 lowest approval rates for tourism applications were for the citizens of Romania (71.6%), Croatia (78.1%), Bulgaria (78.3%), Latvia (84.4%) and Lithuania (89.7%) with all other countries having the grant rate above 95%.[26] The eVisitor in 2013 was granted automatically to 85.8% of applicants but the rates differed significantly among countries. The lowest automatically granted rates in 4th quarter were for the citizens of Bulgaria (16.2%), Romania (18.3%), Czech Republic (58.6%), Lithuania (59.3%), Slovakia (66.3%), Latvia (62.4%), Poland (71.6%) and Hungary (77.7%) with all other countries having the automatic grant rate above 80%.[27]

Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) (subclass 601)[edit]

Development of the ETA system commenced in January 1996. It was first implemented in Singapore on a trial basis on 11 September 1996, for Singapore and US passport holders travelling on Qantas and Singapore Airlines. Implementation of online applications began in June 2001.[21][28] The current Electronic Travel Authority (ETA) (subclass 601) came into effect on 23 March 2013 replacing older ETAs (subclass 976, 977 and 956) and offering a single authorization for both tourists and business people.[29] The ETA allows a stay of up to 3 months at a time in a 12 month period for tourism or business purposes. There is no visa application charge but a service charge of AUD20 applies. At the time of travel to, and entry into, Australia, all holders of an ETA must be free from tuberculosis and must not have any criminal convictions for which the sentence or sentences (whether served or not) total 12 months or more.[30]

Citizen holders of the following passports can apply online:[31]

The citizens of 24 eVisitor eligible countries[32] and citizens of  Taiwan may also apply for the ETA but solely through a travel agent, airline, specialist service provider or an Australian visa office outside Australia.[30]

Online Visitor visa (e600)[edit]

From 23 March 2013, a new Visitor (Subclass 600) visa has been introduced to replace the previous Tourist (Subclass 676) visa.[33] Eligible travellers can apply for this visa online (e600 Visa).[34]

Visa labels in passport are no longer (as of November 2012) required by the Australian authorities but can be issued at a request for an AUD70 Visa Evidence Charge fee.[35]

In addition to countries eligible for the eVisitor and ETA, from July 2013[21] the online applications for the Visitor visa can be made by the citizens of the following 79 countries and entitites (online access is being progressively expanded to all countries):[36][37]

In the 4th quarter of 2013 automatic grant rate for electronically lodged applications outside Australia stood at 28.3%. Prior the rate ranged from 20.4% to 63.2%.[27]

Citizens of other countries need to apply at the nearest Australian consular office or Australian Visa Application Centres (run by VFS Global). Australia intends to progressively expand online lodgement of the Visitor (subclass 600) visa to everyone.[21]

Other visa types[edit]

Other visitor visa types are:[38][39]

  • Transit visa (Subclass 771)1, for people who wish to transit through Australia and who do not qualify for transit without a visa or people travelling to Australia to join a vessel as crew.[40]
  • Medical Treatment (Subclass 602)2, for people to have medical treatment or medical consultations, donate an organ or support the person who is having medical treatment in Australia but not to have medical treatment for surrogate motherhood.[41]
  • Working Holiday Visa (Subclass 417)1, for people aged 18 to 30 years of age, who are interested to have an extended holiday while supplementing their funds with short-term work of up to 12 months and who come from Belgium, Canada, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, South Korea, Sweden, Taiwan or the United Kingdom.[42]
  • Work and Holiday Visa (Subclass 462)1, for people aged 18 to 30 years of age, who are interested to have an extended holiday while supplementing their funds with short-term work of up to 12 months and who come from Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Turkey, the USA or Uruguay.[43]
  • Special Program (Subclass 416)1, for people to participate in approved programs that provide opportunities for cultural enrichment and community benefit.[44]

1 – must apply for this visa outside Australia.
2 – can apply for this visa in or outside Australia.

Visa exemptions[edit]

Special Category Visa[edit]

Citizens of New Zealand can enter Australia, live and work indefinitely if they present a valid New Zealand passport, and met the following conditions; no criminal convictions, no untreated tuberculosis and have not been deported, excluded or removed from any country. Qualifying New Zealand citizens are issued with a Special Category Visa on arrival at any Australian port, unless they already hold another type of Australian visa.[45]

Special Purpose Visa[edit]

Main article: Special purpose visa

A special purpose visa is a visa given by operation of law to certain non-citizens in Australia to whom standard visa and immigration clearance arrangements do not apply. It effectively exempts certain persons from the normal processes for entry into Australia. These include members of the Royal Family and the members of the Royal party, guests of Government, SOFA forces members including civilian component members, Asia‑Pacific forces members, Commonwealth forces members, foreign armed forces dependants, foreign naval forces members, airline positioning crew members and airline crew members, eligible transit passengers, persons visiting Macquarie Island, eligible children born in Australia and Indonesian traditional fishermen visiting the Territory of Ashmore and Cartier Islands.[46][47]

Transit without visa[edit]

Some travellers do not need a transit visa if they depart Australia by air within 8 hours of the scheduled time of their arrival, hold confirmed onward booking and documentation necessary to enter the country of their destination and remain in the transit lounge at an airport (i.e. they do not need to personally re-check their luggage).[48]

Holders of the following passports can transit through Australia under this arrangement:

  • eVisitor eligible passports except Bulgaria, Croatia and Romania
  • ETA eligible passports

Citizens of these countries:

Transit without a visa does not apply to airport in Gold Coast that has no necessary facilities. Overnight transit without a visa does not apply to airport in Cairns and Sydney as overnight stays are not permitted. Transit without a visa through Adelaide applies only to passengers departing on the same aircraft.[50]

Norfolk Island permanent residents[edit]

Non-citizens who are permanent residents of Norfolk Island are not required to hold a visa to travel to Australia. They apply for a Permanent Resident of Norfolk Island visa (PRNIV) at an Australian airport.[51]

Torres Strait[edit]

Residents of thirteen coastal villages in Papua New Guinea are permitted to enter the 'Protected Zone' of the Torres Strait (part of Queensland) for traditional purposes. This exemption from passport control is part of a treaty between Australia and Papua New Guinea negotiated when PNG became independent from Australia in 1975. Full list was determined in 2000 and includes the following 13 villages – Bula, Mari, Jarai, Tais, Buji/Ber, Sigabadaru, Mabadauan, Old Mawatta, Ture Ture, Kadawa, Katatai, Parama and Sui. They can make traditional visits (free movement without passports) into the as far as the 10 degrees 30 minutes South latitude (near Number One Reef). Australian traditional inhabitants come from the following villages – Badu, Boigu, Poruma (Coconut Island), Erub (Darnley Island), Dauan, Kubin, St Pauls, Mabuiag, Mer (Murray Island), Saibai, Ugar (Stephen Island), Warraber (Sue Island), Iama (Yam Island) and Masig (Yorke Island). They can make traditional visits to the Papua New Guinea Treaty Villages and travel north as far as the 9 degrees South latitude (just north of Daru).[52] Vessels from other parts of Papua New Guinea and other countries attempting to cross into Australia or Australian waters are stopped by Australian Customs or the Royal Australian Navy.

External territories[edit]

  • Australian Antarctic Territory – an environmental authorisation must be obtained, based on an environmental impact assessment (EIA) submitted by the organiser of the activity. In some cases, where an activity organised in another country party to the Treaty and Protocol, Australia will recognise an authorisation provided by that country. As well as an environmental authorisation, permits are required for certain activities.[53]
  • Christmas Island – Passports and visas are not required when travelling from the Australian mainland. However, photographic identification must be produced for clearance through Customs and Immigration. Normal Australian Customs and Immigration procedures apply when entry is made from outside Australia.[54]
  • Cocos (Keeling) Islands – Passports and visas are not required when travelling from the Australian mainland. However, photographic identification must be produced for clearance through Customs and Immigration. Normal Australian Customs and Immigration procedures apply when entry is made from outside Australia.[55]
  • Heard Island and McDonald Islands – a permit to enter and undertake activities in the Territory of Heard Island and McDonald Islands is required and is issued by the Australian Antarctic Division.[56]
  • Macquarie Island – a written authorisation of the Director of National Parks and Wildlife is required.[57][58]
  • Norfolk Island – All visitors require a passport. All visitors require an Australian visa except for persons travelling on an Australian or New Zealand passport or persons holding a passport endorsed with Permanent Resident of Norfolk Island visa label.[59]

Modified Non-Return Rate[edit]

The Modified Non-Return Rate is a calculation of the people who arrive on a Visitor visa granted outside Australia, but do not depart before their visa expires. It is considered when assessing visa applications as an indicator of Visitor visa compliance.[60]

Citizenship 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
Afghanistan 18.23 19.02 8.06
Albania 5.86 7.14 3.76
Algeria 1.03 0.91 0.82
Andorra1 3 6.79 0.00 0.00
Angola 0.00 0.00 0.00
Antigua and Barbuda 0.00 0.00 0.00
Argentina 0.66 0.53 0.47
Armenia 3.80 1.63 4.84
Austria1 3 0.44 0.45 0.34
Azerbaijan 0.00 0.94 0.81
Bahamas 1.82 1.47 1.96
Bahrain 4.95 6.19 5.23
Bangladesh 1.60 1.15 2.09
Barbados 0.00 0.00 0.00
Belarus 0.71 0.25 0.48
Belgium1 3 0.45 0.53 0.34
Belize 0.00 0.00 2.86
Benin 5.88 10.53 0.00
Bermuda 0.00 0.00 12.50
Bhutan 0.76 1.50 2.42
Bolivia 0.79 5.17 2.37
Bosnia-Herzegovina 0.98 0.85 1.27
Botswana 1.48 1.53 1.32
BPP 0.00 N/A4 0.00
Brazil 0.91 0.65 0.87
Brunei Darussalam2 3 0.74 0.35 0.62
Bulgaria1 3.73 3.97 4.61
Burkina Faso 4.18 0.00 0.00
Burma (Myanmar) 2.62 1.54 1.60
Burundi 16.67 16.13 0.00
Cambodia 1.95 4.95 2.03
Cameroon 9.47 1.89 1.30
Canada2 3 0.88 0.92 0.66
Cape Verde 0.00 0.00 0.00
Cayman Islands 0.00 0.00 N/A4
Central African Republic N/A4 0.00 0.00
Chad 0.00 0.00 0.00
Chile 1.18 0.81 0.66
China, People's Republic of 0.39 0.32 0.29
Colombia 1.15 1.44 1.71
Comoros 0.00 0.00 0.00
Congo 0.00 3.28 5.26
Costa Rica 1.96 0.50 0.85
Cote d'Ivoire 1.96 0.00 0.00
Croatia1 0.48 0.98 2.19
Cuba 3.37 4.88 2.22
Cyprus1 1.28 2.00 2.28
Czech Republic1 0.77 0.85 0.85
Democratic Republic of Congo 2.99 5.33 7.27
Denmark1 3 0.36 0.47 0.26
Djibouti 0.00 16.67 0.00
Dominica 0.00 0.00 0.00
Dominican Republic 3.85 1.30 0.85
Ecuador 2.39 0.99 0.73
Egypt 6.37 9.23 15.20
El Salvador 6.01 3.67 1.17
Equatorial Guinea 0.00 0.00 0.00
Eritrea 28.89 10.51 15.91
Estonia1 2.66 3.89 3.87
Ethiopia 9.24 10.92 12.23
Fiji 2.34 2.09 1.60
Finland1 3 0.40 0.52 0.36
France1 3 0.52 0.58 0.43
Gabon 0.00 0.00 0.00
Gambia 0.00 0.00 0.00
Georgia 4.55 15.89 10.45
Germany1 3 0.48 0.47 0.36
Ghana 3.57 3.46 4.03
Greece1 3 3.99 8.40 7.97
Grenada 0.00 0.00 0.00
Guatemala 1.13 1.39 4.20
Guinea 0.00 2.17 9.76
Guinea-Bissau 0.00 0.00 0.00
Guyana 4.57 3.05 4.11
Haiti 0.00 0.00 0.00
HKSAR2 3 0.57 0.72 0.65
Honduras 1.62 1.82 1.45
Hungary1 2.09 2.42 2.50
Iceland1 3 1.72 1.23 1.61
India 0.84 0.90 1.02
Indonesia 0.70 0.70 0.46
Iran 2.85 2.65 4.39
Iraq 8.79 6.46 7.60
Ireland1 3 1.39 1.28 1.27
Israel 1.02 0.70 0.41
Italy1 3 0.85 1.12 1.25
Jamaica 1.15 1.13 1.84
Japan2 3 0.19 0.23 0.16
Jordan 2.45 3.65 5.44
Kazakhstan 1.31 0.42 0.56
Kenya 0.62 1.34 1.03
Kiribati 1.97 1.60 1.50
Korea, Dem Peoples Rep Of 0.00 0.00 0.00
Korea, Republic of2 3 0.89 1.02 1.02
Kosovo 0.00 7.84 0.00
Kuwait 0.21 0.73 0.87
Kyrgyzstan 5.17 1.01 0.00
Laos 2.15 2.66 2.48
Latvia1 5.14 2.65 3.61
Lebanon 3.13 2.84 6.62
Lesotho 0.00 0.00 0.00
Liberia 22.38 13.75 4.55
Libya 2.60 4.35 2.56
Liechtenstein1 3 0.00 0.00 0.00
Lithuania1 4.34 3.45 2.99
Luxembourg1 3 0.33 0.38 0.17
Macau 1.03 1.13 0.29
Macedonia 1.93 1.17 2.97
Madagascar 0.00 1.72 0.00
Malawi 1.14 1.04 0.00
Malaysia2 3 1.05 1.58 1.01
Maldives 2.15 0.00 0.64
Mali 0.00 0.00 0.00
Malta1 3 2.09 1.24 1.61
Marshall Islands 3.39 0.00 0.00
Mauritania 0.00 0.00 0.00
Mauritius 1.17 1.56 1.56
Mexico 0.85 0.78 0.77
Micronesia 0.00 7.93 1.95
Moldova 1.15 1.05 1.01
Monaco1 3 2.16 0.00 0.00
Mongolia 2.54 1.44 3.08
Montenegro 3.09 1.03 2.27
Morocco 3.40 0.49 1.91
Mozambique 0.97 1.42 0.51
Namibia 0.71 0.59 0.00
Nauru 0.97 0.68 0.55
Nepal 5.26 1.24 2.32
Netherlands1 3 0.46 0.49 0.37
Netherlands Antilles N/A4 0.00 N/A4
New Zealand 0.74 1.09 0.44
Nicaragua 7.41 2.83 11.11
Niger 0.00 0.00 0.00
Nigeria 3.70 4.42 4.40
Norway1 3 0.63 0.50 0.36
Oman 1.15 1.10 0.42
Pakistan 3.94 4.44 4.39
Palau 0.00 9.74 0.00
Palestinian Authority 10.84 4.22 13.18
Panama 1.34 0.74 0.00
Papua New Guinea 1.31 0.86 0.82
Paraguay 1.31 1.72 1.61
Peru 1.59 1.80 1.15
Philippines 1.50 1.91 2.00
Poland1 1.76 1.60 1.75
Portugal1 3 1.68 2.22 2.29
Qatar 0.52 0.36 0.17
Romania1 4.03 4.01 4.77
Russian Federation 0.47 0.61 0.48
Rwanda 2.78 0.00 8.33
Samoa 1.97 2.41 1.99
San Marino1 3 0.00 0.00 2.42
Sao Tome & Principe N/A4 0.00 N/A4
Saudi Arabia 4.93 5.18 5.39
Senegal 2.94 0.00 2.56
Serbia 1.13 1.06 1.34
Serbia and Montenegro 0.00 0.00 0.00
Seychelles 1.38 1.55 1.34
Sierra Leone 0.00 5.34 4.63
Singapore2 3 0.32 0.33 0.26
Slovakia1 0.67 1.01 0.87
Slovenia1 0.60 0.66 0.82
Solomon Islands 1.59 1.63 1.19
Somalia 0.00 0.00 0.00
South Africa 0.91 0.72 0.65
Spain1 3 0.95 0.94 1.05
Sri Lanka 1.23 1.26 1.25
Stateless 5.11 4.31 5.79
St Kitts-Nevis 0.00 0.00 0.00
St Lucia 0.00 0.00 0.00
St Vincent & the Grenadines 0.00 0.00 0.00
Sudan 4.06 2.34 4.96
Suriname 0.00 12.00 0.00
Swaziland 0.00 0.00 0.00
Sweden1 3 0.61 0.61 0.60
Switzerland1 3 0.47 0.39 0.24
Syria 2.70 13.23 20.68
Tadjikistan 0.00 0.00 0.00
Taiwan2 3 0.58 0.72 0.73
Tanzania 0.69 0.19 0.79
Thailand 0.85 1.02 0.92
Timor-Leste 0.59 1.53 2.76
Togo 0.00 0.00 8.33
Tonga 3.54 5.60 2.88
Trinidad and Tobago 0.95 0.31 1.04
Tunisia 1.44 0.88 0.83
Turkey 1.80 1.15 1.55
Turkmenistan 6.25 0.00 0.00
Tuvalu 1.26 0.64 0.40
Uganda 4.16 2.95 1.92
Ukraine 1.40 2.08 1.32
UN Convention Refugee 9.19 4.40 2.63
United Arab Emirates 0.31 0.38 0.34
United Kingdom1 3 0.68 0.69 0.58
UN Agency 2.78 1.08 0.00
United Nations Organisation 0.00 0.97 0.00
United States of America2 3 0.74 0.73 0.51
Uruguay 2.97 0.77 0.37
Uzbekistan 3.83 0.00 0.76
Vanuatu 0.91 1.17 0.85
Vatican City1 3 0.00 0.00 0.00
Venezuela 1.61 1.24 0.68
Vietnam 1.99 1.18 1.44
Yemen 3.85 4.37 2.86
Yugoslavia 3.77 0.00 0.00
Zambia 1.61 1.77 0.42
Zimbabwe 3.12 2.02 2.79
Global average 0.74 0.79 0.69

1 - eVisitor eligible
2 - online ETA eligible
3 - officially considered low risk[2]
4 - N/A indicates that no arrivals were recorded for this citizenship during the reporting period

SmartGate[edit]

Main article: SmartGate

SmartGate is an automated border processing system being introduced by the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service and New Zealand Customs Service. Apart from eligible Australian and New Zealand citizens the SmartGate is available to:[61]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Visa Information - Australia". Timatic. IATA. Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
  2. ^ a b The list of ETA eligible passports which are considered low risk
  3. ^ "COM(2012) 681 final REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL - Seventh report on certain third countries' maintenance of visa requirements in breach of the principle of reciprocity" (.pdf). European Commission. 
  4. ^ "Same visa policy for all European Union Member States". EUROPA. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  5. ^ Office for Official Publications of the European Communities (2001-03-21). "Council Regulation (EC) No 539/2001" (subscription required). Official Journal of the European Communities 44 (L 81): 1–7; Article 1(2) and Annex II. 
  6. ^ "Visa and Direct Airside Transit Visa (DATV) nationals". UK Visas. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  7. ^ "Do I need a visa to come to Ireland?". Department of Foreign Affairs, Government of Ireland. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  8. ^ "Information from the Commission about notifications by the Member States of cases of non-reciprocity in accordance with Article 1(4)(a) of Council Regulation (EC) No 539/2001 as amended by Regulation (EU) No 1289/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council". European Commission. 12 April 2014. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  9. ^ EU gives US six months to come clean on visa policy
  10. ^ "Visa Waiver Program (VWP)". U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  11. ^ "Visa Waiver Program - How a Country Qualifies". U.S. Department of State. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  12. ^ "Visa Free Entry to Japan for Short-term Visitors from Australia". Department of Immigration and Citizenship. 1998-11-05. Archived from the original on 2007-06-09. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  13. ^ "Countries and territories whose citizens do not need a visa (visa exemptions)". Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  14. ^ "Visit Visa / Entry Permit Requirements for the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region". Immigration Department of the Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  15. ^ "Visa Requirement by Country". Immigration Department of Malaysia. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  16. ^ "Visa Requirements for Entry into Singapore". High Commission of The Republic of Singapore - London. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  17. ^ "Nationals of countries or regions allowed for visa-free entry". Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  18. ^ "Visa-Exempt Entry". Bureau of Consular Affairs. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  19. ^ "Visa Information". Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  20. ^ Australia mulls visa waiver for Gulf nationals
  21. ^ a b c d "Fact Sheet 53 – Australia's Entry System for Visitors". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  22. ^ a b "eVisitor (subclass 651)". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  23. ^ "eVisitor: Frequently asked questions for clients". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  24. ^ Excluding British National (Overseas), British Overseas Territories citizen, British Overseas citizen, British protected person or British Subject passport.
  25. ^ "For eVisitor Applicants - Who can apply". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  26. ^ "Report". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 23 June 2014. 
  27. ^ a b "Report". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 16 December 2013. 
  28. ^ "Policy study on an EU Electronic System for travel Authorization (EU ESTA) - Annexes: Introduction of the ETA, eVisitor and eVisa systems". PricewaterhouseCoopers. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  29. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for Electronic Travel Authority (subclass 601)". Australian - Embassy Republic of Korea. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  30. ^ a b "Electronic Travel Authority (Subclass 601)". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  31. ^ "For Electronic Travel Authority Applicants - Who can apply". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  32. ^ Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, The Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Republic of San Marino, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom (British Citizen, British National-Overseas), Vatican City.
  33. ^ "Visitor Visa (Subclass 600)". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  34. ^ "Visitor (e600) Visa – Online Applications". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  35. ^ About Your Visa
  36. ^ "Online lodgement Arrangements for Subclass 600". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 1 November 2013. 
  37. ^ Faster Australian visitor visa application now in place for more countries
  38. ^ Visitors - Visas & Immigration
  39. ^ Visa Application Charges
  40. ^ Transit Visa (Subclass 771)
  41. ^ Medical Treatment Visa (Subclass 602)
  42. ^ Working Holiday Visa (Subclass 417)
  43. ^ Work and Holiday Visa (Subclass 462)
  44. ^ Special Program Visa (Subclass 416)
  45. ^ "Fact Sheet 17 – New Zealanders in Australia". Department of Immigration and Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  46. ^ "Migration Act 1958, taking into account amendments up to Migration Amendment (Temporary Sponsored Visas) Act 2013". Australian Government - ComLaw. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  47. ^ "Migration Regulations 1994, taking into account amendments up to Migration Amendment (Visa Application Charge) Regulation 2013". Australian Government - ComLaw. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  48. ^ Transit without visa arrangements - When a visa is not needed
  49. ^ Not applicable to nationals of these countries: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bahrain, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Comoros, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mauritania, Morocco, Pakistan, the Republic of Yemen, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Zimbabwe, Arab Non-National Passport Holders (ANNPH) or Taiwanese holding diplomatic or official passports.
  50. ^ [1]
  51. ^ "Fact Sheet 59 - Immigration Arrangements for Norfolk Island". Department of Immigration & Border Protection. Retrieved 25 September 2013. 
  52. ^ "Torres Strait Treaty and You - What is free movement for traditional activities?". Australian Government = Dept. of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Retrieved 3 March 2010. 
  53. ^ Environmental approvals for tour and expedition organisers
  54. ^ Christmas Island traveller information
  55. ^ Cocos (Keeling) Islands traveller information
  56. ^ Can I visit Heard Island?
  57. ^ Guidelines for Tourist Operations and Visits
  58. ^ Guidelines for Tourist Visits to Macquarie Island Nature Reserve and World Heritage Area
  59. ^ Customs & Immigration
  60. ^ Modified Non-Return Rate Quarterly Report Ending at 30 June 2013
  61. ^ SmartGate > Who can use

External links[edit]