Elements of Persuasion

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Elements Of Persuasion
Studio album by James LaBrie
Released March 29, 2005
Recorded 2004-2005
Genre Heavy metal
Progressive metal
Length 66:38
Label InsideOut Music
Producer James LaBrie, Matt Guillory
James LaBrie chronology
MullMuzzler 2
(2001)
Elements of Persuasion
(2005)
Static Impulse
(2010)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[1]

Elements of Persuasion, released March 29, 2005, is Dream Theater lead singer James LaBrie's third solo album, his first two being Keep It to Yourself and MullMuzzler 2, which were released under his band MullMuzzler.

Unlike his previous solo works, this one is released under his name - as suggested by his publisher. He also hired some new musicians, among others the new guitar virtuoso Marco Sfogli from Italy and Richard Chycki as sound engineer, resulting in a different sound. Despite the changes, the album is still based on the same general style used on the past two albums, although with a much heavier sound. This is the last of LaBrie's solo albums to feature drummer Mike Mangini.

Concept and Making[edit]

Elements of Persuasion was written over a period of two years primarily by James LaBrie and keyboardist Matt Guillory with production taking place any time LaBrie had “down time” from Dream Theater or other obligations. The pair would begin to construct songs together, then independently grow and evolve the works. This process was facilitated by the pair sending MP3s back and forth to one another.[2] The pair knew that they wanted to produce a “very aggressive and heavy album” focused on vocal melodies and lyrics. The lyrics of the songs discuss a range of issues from organized religion to dictatorial oppression.[3] “LaBrie explains Elements of Persuasion as the things that guide us during our lifetime and how at each stage of life certain things become much more important than others”.[4]

Influences[edit]

LaBrie cites several bands as influences for Elements of Persuasion, such as Mudvayne, Meshuggah, Linkin Park, and Sevendust, commenting “Those bands were saying something to us, and I like the way they were approaching their music.[5] I thought it was refreshing, intelligently done and just had a feel of its own.”[6] The direct influences of these bands can be seen in songs such as “Lost”, with its jazz-fusion vibe or “Smashed” with its Bruce Hornsby inspired piano melody. Indirect influences include literature which LaBrie reads, social issues, personal observations, and integration within relationships.[7]

Confusion with Octavarium[edit]

Dream Theater’s eighth studio album, Octavarium, and LaBrie’s Elements of Persuasion were both released in 2005, with fans awaiting the release of each. In an alleged attempt to strike back at fans illegally downloading Dream Theater’s music before their albums were actually released, Mike Portnoy intentionally leaked several tracks from Elements of Persuasion citing them as tracks from Octavarium. This leak led to confusion amongst some fans at concerts and even some DJs playing incorrectly labeled tracks.

Track listing[edit]

All lyrics written by James LaBrie except where noted. 

No. Title Length
1. "Crucify" (Lyrics by Matt Guillory) 6:01
2. "Alone" (Lyrics by Matt Guillory) 5:37
3. "Freaks"   5:29
4. "Invisible"   5:37
5. "Lost" (Lyrics by Matt Guillory) 3:41
6. "Undecided"   5:31
7. "Smashed"   5:34
8. "Pretender"   5:33
9. "Slightly Out of Reach"   6:11
10. "Oblivious"   5:23
11. "In Too Deep"   6:56
12. "Drained"   5:10
Total length:
1:06:43

Personnel[edit]

Production[edit]

  • Produced By James LaBrie & Matt Guillory
  • Engineered & Mixed By Richard Chycki

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Allmusic review
  2. ^ Stefanis 2005
  3. ^ Stefainis 2005
  4. ^ Reesman 2005
  5. ^ Reesman 2005
  6. ^ Reesman 2005
  7. ^ Stefanis 2005

References[edit]

  • "Interview: JAMES LaBRIE." Interview by John Stefanis. Get Ready to ROCK! 2005.
  • LaBrie, James. "10 Questions for ... James LaBrie: Talkin' Rock 'N' Roll." Interview by Bryan Reesman. Goldmine 19 Aug. 2005: 26. Print.

External links[edit]