Eliezer Sandberg

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Eliezer Sandberg
Date of birth (1962-02-21) 21 February 1962 (age 52)
Place of birth Haifa, Israel
Knessets 13, 14, 15, 16
Faction represented in Knesset
1992–1999 Tzomet
1999 Israel in the Centre
1999 HaTzeirim
1999–2006 Shinui
2006 Secular Faction
2006 National Home
Ministerial roles
2003–2004 Minister of Science & Technology
2004 Minister of National Infrastructure

Eliezer Sandberg (Hebrew: אליעזר זנדברג‎, born 21 February 1962) is a former Israeli politician who served as a government minister between 2003 and 2004.

Biography[edit]

Born in Haifa, Sandberg studied law at Tel Aviv University, gaining an LLB. He joined the Tzomet party, and became a member of its secretariat in 1988. He also served as the party's legal adviser and chairman of its Haifa branch. In 1992 he was elected to the Knesset on Tzomet's list. He was re-elected in 1996 and in November 1998 was appointed Deputy Minister of Education. On 23 February 1999 he left Tzomet to become a founding member of the Israel in the Centre party (later renamed the Centre Party), but on 22 March he left the new party to establish his own faction, HaTzeirim. On 29 March merged HaTzeirim into Shinui.[1]

Sandberg was re-elected on the Shinui list in 1999 and 2003, and in February 2003 was appointed Minister of Science and Technology, a role he held until July 2004 when he became Minister of National Infrastructure. He left the cabinet on 4 December 2004 when Shinui left the coalition government.

In January 2006 Sandberg was amongst the Shinui MKs which left the party to establish the Secular Faction. On 5 February he and Hemi Doron left the new faction to establish the National Home. Prior to the 2006 elections the two joined Likud, but were not included on its list, and thus lost their seats in the election.[2]

Sandberg is expected to be named Cabinet Secretary by Prime Minister Designate Benjamin Netanyahu should he be able to form a government.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mergers and Splits Among Parliamentary Groups Knesset website
  2. ^ Politics: Filling in the blanks The Jerusalem Post, 10 February 2008
  3. ^ [1] Haaretz

External links[edit]