Eliot Teltscher

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Eliot Teltscher
Country  United States
Residence Irvine, California
Born (1959-03-15) March 15, 1959 (age 55)
Rancho Palos Verdes, California
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Turned pro 1977
Retired 1988
Plays Right-handed (one-handed backhand)
Prize money $1,653,997
Singles
Career record 399–216
Career titles 10
Highest ranking No. 6 (May 7, 1982)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open QF (1983)
French Open 4R (1979, 1982, 1983)
Wimbledon 3R (1977)
US Open QF (1980, 1981, 1983)
Other tournaments
Tour Finals QF (1984)
WCT Finals QF (1984)
Doubles
Career record 161–164
Career titles 4
Highest ranking No. 38 (August 26, 1985)
Grand Slam Doubles results
French Open F (1981)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
French Open W (1983)
Last updated on: December 17, 2012.

Eliot Teltscher (born March 15, 1959, in Rancho Palos Verdes, California) is a retired professional American tennis player. He resides in Irvine, California.

Tennis career[edit]

Early years[edit]

Teltscher began playing tennis when he was nine, and by the time he was seventeen, he was ranked in the top ten in the United States junior rankings. He attended UCLA in 1978 on a tennis scholarship, but dropped out to begin his professional tennis career.[1] In the NCAA tournament that year, he was ranked number two and was expected play John Mcenroe from Stanford in the final. However, he lost in the quarter-finals to John Sadri of North Carolina State. That same year he defeated Onny Parun to win the New Zealand Open.

Pro career[edit]

In 1979, Teltscher turned pro. A worldwide top 10 player from 1980–82, he was ranked no lower than #15 from through 1984. He reached his highest singles ATP-ranking on May 7, 1982, when he became ranked #6 in the world.

In 1981, he had a famous outburst during the French Open at the end of a match against Ilie Năstase, against whom he lost on a controversial point. Furious at the decision, Teltscher snapped and grabbed the referee by the tie and had to be stopped by a few spectators who entered the court.

He and his partner Terry Moor made it to the finals of the French Open in 1981, and he and Barbara Jordan won the mixed doubles title in 1983.[1] He made it to the quarterfinals at the US Open in 1980, 1981, and 1983, where each time he was defeated by Jimmy Connors.[1] He beat Connors, ranked # 8 in the world, in Chicago 6–3, 6–1. He won 10 singles titles during his professional career, which ended in 1988.

Davis Cup[edit]

Teltscher was on the U.S. Davis Cup team in 1982, 1983, and 1985. His team defeated France in the 1982 tournament.[1]

Major finals[edit]

Grand Slam finals[edit]

Men's doubles[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1981 French Open Clay United States Terry Moor Switzerland Heinz Günthardt
Hungary Balázs Taróczy
2–6, 6–7, 3–6

Mixed doubles[edit]

Outcome Year Championship Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Winner 1983 French Open Clay United States Barbara Jordan United States Leslie Allen
United States Charles Strode
6–2, 6–3

ATP Tour finals[edit]

Singles 24 (10-14)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Championship Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 1978 Atlanta, U.S. Hard United States Stan Smith 6–4, 1–6, 1–2, ret.
Winner 1. 1978 Hong Kong Hard United States Pat Du Pré 6–4, 6–3, 6–2
Winner 2. 1979 Atlanta, U.S. Hard Australia John Alexander 6–3, 4–6, 6–2
Runner-up 2. 1980 Birmingham, U.S. Carpet United States Jimmy Connors 3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 3. 1980 New Orleans, U.S. Carpet Poland Wojtek Fibak 4–6, 5–7
Winner 3. 1980 Atlanta, U.S. Hard United States Terry Moor 6–2, 6–2
Runner-up 4. 1980 San Francisco, U.S. Carpet United States Gene Mayer 2–6, 6–2, 1–6
Winner 4. 1980 Maui, U.S. Hard United States Tim Wilkison 7–6, 6–3
Runner-up 5. 1980 Republic of China Carpet United States Jimmy Connors 2–6, 4–6
Runner-up 6. 1980 Tokyo Outdoor, Japan Clay Czechoslovakia Ivan Lendl 6–3, 4–6, 0–6
Winner 5. 1981 San Juan, U.S. Hard United States Tim Gullikson 6–4, 6–2
Runner-up 7. 1981 Montreal, Canada Hard Czechoslovakia Ivan Lendl 3–6, 2–6
Winner 6. 1981 San Francisco, U.S. Carpet United States Brian Teacher 6–3, 7–6
Runner-up 8. 1981 Tokyo Outdoor, Japan Clay Hungary Balázs Taróczy 3–6, 6–1, 6–7
Runner-up 9. 1982 Rome, Italy Clay Ecuador Andrés Gómez 2–6, 3–6, 2–6
Runner-up 10. 1982 Melbourne Indoor, Australia Carpet United States Vitas Gerulaitis 6–2, 2–6, 2–6
Runner-up 11. 1983 La Quinta, U.S. Hard Spain José Higueras 4–6, 2–6
Winner 7. 1983 Tokyo, Japan Hard Ecuador Andrés Gómez 7–5, 3–6, 6–1
Runner-up 12. 1984 Los Angeles, U.S. Hard United States Jimmy Connors 4–6, 6–4, 4–6
Winner 8. 1984 Brisbane, Australia Hard Paraguay Francisco González 3–6, 6–3, 6–4
Winner 9. 1984 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard United States Vitas Gerulaitis 6–3, 6–1, 7–6
Runner-up 13. 1987 Scottsdale, U.S. Hard United States Brad Gilbert 2–6, 2–6
Winner 10. 1987 Hong Kong Hard Australia John Fitzgerald 6–7, 3–6, 6–1, 6–2, 7–5
Runner-up 14. 1988 Guarujá, Brazil Hard Brazil Luiz Mattar 3–6, 3–6

Doubles 14 (4-10)[edit]

Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
Runner-up 1. 1978 Columbus, U.S. Clay Mexico Marcello Lara Australia Colin Dibley
Australia Bob Giltinan
2–6, 3–6
Winner 1. 1979 Tulsa, U.S. Hard (i) Paraguay Francisco González Australia Colin Dibley
United States Tom Gullikson
6–7, 7–5, 6–3
Runner-up 2. 1979 Atlanta, U.S. Hard Australia Steve Docherty South Africa Raymond Moore
Romania Ilie Năstase
4–6, 2–6
Winner 2. 1980 New Orleans, U.S. Carpet United States Terry Moor South Africa Raymond Moore
South Africa Robert Trogolo
7–6, 6–1
Runner-up 3. 1980 Rome, Italy Clay Hungary Balázs Taróczy Australia Mark Edmondson
Australia Kim Warwick
6–7, 6–7
Runner-up 4. 1980 Columbus, Ohio, U.S. Hard United States Peter Fleming United States Brian Gottfried
United States Sandy Mayer
4–6, 2–6
Runner-up 5. 1980 Tokyo Outdoor, Japan Clay United States Terry Moor Australia Ross Case
Chile Jaime Fillol
3–6, 6–3, 4–6
Runner-up 6. 1980 Wembley, England Carpet United States Bill Scanlon United States Peter Fleming
United States John McEnroe
5–7, 3–6
Runner-up 7. 1981 San Juan, Puerto Rico Hard United States Tim Gullikson United States Tim Mayotte
United States Chris Mayotte
4–6, 6–7
Runner-up 8. 1981 La Quinta, U.S. Hard United States Terry Moor United States Bruce Manson
United States Brian Teacher
6–7, 2–6
Runner-up 9. 1981 French Open, Paris Clay United States Terry Moor Switzerland Heinz Günthardt
Hungary Balázs Taróczy
2–6, 6–7, 3–6
Winner 3. 1982 Delray Beach WCT, U.S. Clay United States Mel Purcell Czechoslovakia Tomáš Šmíd
Hungary Balázs Taróczy
6–4, 7–6
Winner 4. 1982 Maui, U.S. Hard United States Mike Cahill Paraguay Francisco González
South Africa Bernard Mitton
6–4, 6–4
Runner-up 10. 1984 Johannesburg, South Africa Hard United States Steve Meister United States Tracy Delatte
Paraguay Francisco González
6–7, 1–6

Coaching[edit]

He served coach for Justin Gimelstob, Richey Reneberg (1997), Jeff Tarango (1995), Pete Sampras, Jim Grabb (1992), and others.[1]

Teltscher served as a head men's tennis coach at Pepperdine University for the 1991–92 school season,[1] and as a tennis coach at the Manhattan Beach Country Club from 1992 to 1997.

He was a coach of the US national team from 1998 to 2001, when he resigned to become personal coach to Taylor Dent.[1]

He was named USTA Director of Tennis Operations in December 2002.

Teltscher was named the 2003 Pan American Games Men's Coach.

Hall of Fame[edit]

Teltscher, who is Jewish, was inducted into the National Jewish Sports Hall of Fame in 1991.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Teltscher, Eliot". Jews in Sports. Retrieved 21 February 2014. 
  2. ^ "Eliot Teltscher". International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. Retrieved 21 February 2014. 

External links[edit]