Elizabeth de Vere

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For other people named Elizabeth de Vere, see Elizabeth de Vere (disambiguation).
Elizabeth de Vere
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Castle Hedingham, home of the Earls of Oxford
Spouse(s) Sir Hugh Courtenay
John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray
Sir William de Cossington

Issue

Hugh Courtenay (died 1374)
Noble family De Vere
Father John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford
Mother Maud de Badlesmere
Died 14 or 16 August 1375

Elizabeth de Vere (died 14 or 16 August 1375) was the daughter of John de Vere, 7th Earl of Oxford and Maud de Badlesmere,[1] and the wife of Sir Hugh Courtenay (died c. 1348), then John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray, and then Sir William de Cossington.

Before 3 September 1341 she married Sir Hugh Courtenay (died c. 1348), the eldest son of Hugh Courtenay, 10th Earl of Devon (12 July 1303 – 2 May 1377), and Margaret de Bohun (d. 16 December 1391), daughter of Humphrey Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex (c.1276 – 16 March 1322), by Elizabeth (d. 5 May 1316), the daughter of King Edward I.[2][3]

They had one son, Sir Hugh Courtenay, who died without issue on 20 February 1374.[2][1]

Sir Hugh Courtenay died shortly after Easter term 1348,[1] and was buried at Ford Abbey, Somerset.[2][1] While on progress through Dorset, Queen Philippa is said to have 'placed a piece of cloth of gold as an oblation on his tomb' on 2 September 1349.[1]

Elizabeth de Vere married, secondly, before 4 May 1351, the marriage later being validated by papal dispensation of that date, John de Mowbray, 3rd Baron Mowbray (d. 4 October 1361).[1][4]

She married thirdly, before 18 January 1369, Sir William de Cossington,[1] son and heir of Stephen de Cossington of Cossington in Aylesford, Kent. Not long after the marriage she and her new husband surrendered themselves to the Fleet prison for debt.[5][4] According to Archer, the cause may have been her stepson, John de Mowbray, 4th Baron Mowbray's, prosecution of her for waste of his estates; he had been awarded damages against her of almost £1000.[6]

She died 14 or 16 August 1375.[1][4][7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Richardson I 2011, p. 542.
  2. ^ a b c Cokayne 1916, pp. 324-5.
  3. ^ Richardson I 2011, pp. 239-43, 540-1.
  4. ^ a b c Richardson III 2011, p. 203.
  5. ^ Cokayne 1936, p. 383.
  6. ^ Archer 2004.
  7. ^ Cokayne dates her death to 23 September 1375.

References[edit]

  • Archer, Rowena E. (2004). "Mowbray, John (III), fourth Lord Mowbray (1340–1368)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19452.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  • Cokayne, George Edward (1916). The Complete Peerage, edited by Vicary Gibbs IV. London: St. Catherine Press. 
  • Cokayne, George Edward (1936). The Complete Peerage, edited by H.A. Doubleday and Lord Howard de Walden IX. London: St. Catherine Press. 
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families I (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. 
  • Richardson, Douglas (2011). Everingham, Kimball G., ed. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families III (2nd ed.). Salt Lake City. ISBN 144996639X.