Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin

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Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin
Village
Location of Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin
Location of Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin
Coordinates: 43°49′55″N 88°1′3″W / 43.83194°N 88.01750°W / 43.83194; -88.01750Coordinates: 43°49′55″N 88°1′3″W / 43.83194°N 88.01750°W / 43.83194; -88.01750
Country United States
State Wisconsin
County Sheboygan
Area[1]
 • Total 1.29 sq mi (3.34 km2)
 • Land 1.28 sq mi (3.32 km2)
 • Water 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation[2] 948 ft (289 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 967
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 961
 • Density 755.5/sq mi (291.7/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 920
FIPS code 55-23275[5]
GNIS feature ID 1584500[2]
Website www.elkhartlake.com
Downtown Elkhart Lake

Elkhart Lake is a village in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, United States, located within the northwestern part of the county within the Town of Rhine. The population was 967 at the 2010 census. It is included in the Sheboygan, Wisconsin Metropolitan Statistical Area. Elkhart Lake may be best known for hosting road races on public county roads during the 1950s,[6] later moving to a dedicated race track called Road America, which is located a few miles south of the village.

History[edit]

Elkhart Lake takes its name from a neighboring lake which is said to resemble an elk's heart.[7]

Transportation[edit]

Elkhart Lake is located approximately one mile southeast of the northern terminus of the Kettle Moraine Scenic Drive. The Scenic Drive was part of the road racing circuit used in the 1950s. Wisconsin Highway 67 runs north/south through the city. Secondary routes include County Highway A from the northeast. County Highway J runs concurrent with the Kettle Moraine Scenic Drive through the city. They enter the city from the northwest, run north/south through the center of the city, and exit to the southwest.

Geography[edit]

Elkhart Lake is located at 43°49′55″N 88°1′3″W / 43.83194°N 88.01750°W / 43.83194; -88.01750 (43.832057, -88.017440).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.29 square miles (3.34 km2), of which, 1.28 square miles (3.32 km2) of it is land and 0.01 square miles (0.03 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 967 people, 457 households, and 286 families residing in the village. The population density was 755.5 inhabitants per square mile (291.7 /km2). There were 706 housing units at an average density of 551.6 per square mile (213.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 97.7% White, 0.2% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.8% from other races, and 0.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.7% of the population.

There were 457 households of which 18.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.4% were non-families. 28.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.58.

The median age in the village was 48.9 years. 15.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.7% were from 25 to 44; 34.7% were from 45 to 64; and 21.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.4% male and 49.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,021 people, 436 households, and 292 families residing in the village. The population density was 790.5 people per square mile (305.6/km²). There were 599 housing units at an average density of 463.8 per square mile (179.3/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.73% White, 0.10% Asian, 0.39% from other races, and 0.78% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.08% of the population.

There were 436 households out of which 23.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living together, 5.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.75.

In the village the population was spread out with 18.0% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 31.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 96.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $56,538, and the median income for a family was $60,694. Males had a median income of $37,708 versus $26,776 for females. The per capita income for the village was $27,873. About 0.7% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.

Racing[edit]

The site of the 1951 and 1952 start/finish line.

Racing at Elkhart Lake dates back to the 1950s. The very first races were held on July 23, 1950 on a 3.35 mile road circuit north of the lake. These first races were very successful for the time, drawing a crowd of over 5,000. Races were originally held on a street circuit that ran around the Lake with the start/finish line in the village. In 1951 and 1952, races were held on a new 6.5 mile circuit that circumvented the Lake. The 1951 races drew an estimated crowd of 50,000 spectators and the 1952 races saw an estimated crowd of over 100,000 people.[9] The 1952 races would be the last races held on the open road circuit. Three years later, a new, specially designed track was built south of the village. Road America was built in 1955 with the first racing being held on September 10 & 11, 1955.[10] Each year, Road America holds over 425 events, one of most popular being the Kohler International Challenge in July. The economic impact from the track, its events, and visitors is estimated at $70 million annually.[11]

Concours d'Elegance[edit]

Crowd on Lake Street at the 2010 Road & Track Concours d'Elegance.

Every July, during the Kohler International Challenge, Road & Track holds a race car Concours d'Elegance in the village. This draws a large crowd as people line the streets from Road America to the shore of Elkhart Lake watching the cars drive past on their way to downtown Elkhart Lake. The cars park in the streets of Elkhart Lake, mainly on Lake Street, where curious visitors, car enthuisiasts, and other racers alike walk up and down the streets looking at the cars.[12] As the concourse comes to a close, Road & Track announces the winner of various awards including the best-looking car award. The cars return to the track around 7:30 pm, just before the sun sets because many of the cars do not have headlights.[13]

Images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-24. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Cars Take Over the Town." Popular Mechanics, March 1952, pp. 153-157.
  7. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 117. 
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ "A Brief History of Open Road Racing in Elkhart Lake". Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  10. ^ "The History of Road America". Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Thing to do in Elkhart Lake". Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Councours d'Elegance". June 21, 2010. Retrieved December 19, 2010. 
  13. ^ "Road & Track Concourse d'Elegance". June 30, 2010. Retrieved December 19, 2010. 

External links[edit]