Elkhorn River

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Elkhorn River[1]
Elkhorn River from Cowboy Trail W of 519 Av.JPG
The Elkhorn River in Antelope County, Nebraska
Origin Confluence of North Fork and South Fork
42°36′36″N 099°11′00″W / 42.61000°N 99.18333°W / 42.61000; -99.18333
Mouth Confluence with Platte
41°07′12″N 096°18′42″W / 41.12000°N 96.31167°W / 41.12000; -96.31167Coordinates: 41°07′12″N 096°18′42″W / 41.12000°N 96.31167°W / 41.12000; -96.31167
Progression PlatteMissouriMississippi
Source elevation 2,162 ft (659 m)
Mouth elevation 1,070 ft (330 m)
The Elkhorn River

The Elkhorn River (Pawnee: Kicita [2]) originates in the eastern Sandhills of Nebraska and is one of the largest tributaries of the Platte River, flowing 290 miles (470 km)[3] and joining the Platte just southwest of Omaha, approximately 1 mile (2 km) south and 3 miles (5 km) west of Gretna.

Located in northeast and north-central Nebraska, the Elkhorn River basin encompasses approximately 7,000 mi² (18,000 km²). The Elkhorn also has several tributaries, including its own North and South forks, Logan Creek, Rock Creek and Maple Creek.

History[edit]

The Lewis and Clark Expedition encountered the Elkhorn River near its confluence with the Platte, and referred to it as the 'Corne de Cerf'. Located a few miles north of the confluence is the Elkhorn Crossing Recreation Area. This public park, operated by the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District, marks the location where thousands of immigrants in the nineteenth century, bound for the west, camped while waiting to cross the river.[4] For years Logan Fontenelle and Joseph LaFlesche, young leaders of the Omaha people, owned the ferry that carried people, wagons and animals between the two river banks.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Elkhorn River". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2011-02-14. 
  2. ^ "AISRI Dictionary Database Search--prototype version. "River", Southband Pawnee". American Indian Studies Research Institute. Retrieved 2012-05-26. 
  3. ^ "The National Map". U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved Feb 10, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Platte and Elkhorn River". Papio NRD Website. Retrieved 31 March 2011. 

See also[edit]