Elkins, West Virginia

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Elkins, West Virginia
City
Davis Avenue in downtown Elkins in 2006
Davis Avenue in downtown Elkins in 2006
Location of Elkins, West Virginia
Location of Elkins, West Virginia
Coordinates: 38°55′17″N 79°51′3″W / 38.92139°N 79.85083°W / 38.92139; -79.85083Coordinates: 38°55′17″N 79°51′3″W / 38.92139°N 79.85083°W / 38.92139; -79.85083
Country United States
State West Virginia
County Randolph
Government
 • Mayor Van Broughton[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 3.43 sq mi (8.88 km2)
 • Land 3.43 sq mi (8.88 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation[3] 1,926 ft (587 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • Total 7,094
 • Estimate (2012[5]) 7,180
 • Density 2,068.2/sq mi (798.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 26241
Area code(s) 304/681
FIPS code 54-24580
GNIS feature ID 1551037[6]
Website www.CityOfElkinsWV.com

Elkins is a city in Randolph County, West Virginia, United States. The community was incorporated in 1890 and named in honor of Stephen Benton Elkins[7] (1841–1911), a U.S. Senator from West Virginia. The population was 7,094 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Randolph County.[8] Elkins is home to Davis and Elkins College and to the Mountain State Forest Festival, held in early October every year.

History[edit]

The City of Elkins, situated on a bend in the Tygart Valley River, was developed by Senators Henry Gassaway Davis and Stephen Benton Elkins and named for Senator Elkins, in 1890. Elkins became the county seat in 1899. The founders developed railroad lines, coal mines, and timbering businesses. Together, they built the West Virginia Central and Pittsburgh Railway into Elkins in 1889, opening a vast territory to industrial development in the late 1890s. In 1904 the Randolph County courthouse was completed in Elkins. It was built in the Richardsonian Romanesque style.

As the railroad (merged into the Western Maryland Railway in 1905) expanded, Elkins experienced the luxury of passenger train service. In 1930, 18 passenger trains were arriving and leaving Elkins daily. All passenger service was discontinued in 1958.

Davis and Elkins each built permanent places of residence known as Halliehurst and Graceland, where the view of the town was delightful and picturesque.

Today, Elkins has an active economic development authority, chamber of commerce, downtown business organization and numerous social, fraternal and service organizations that sponsor annual events like the Mountain State Forest Festival, which brings thousands of people into the city every year.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 737
1900 2,016 173.5%
1910 5,260 160.9%
1920 6,788 29.0%
1930 7,345 8.2%
1940 8,133 10.7%
1950 9,121 12.1%
1960 8,307 −8.9%
1970 8,287 −0.2%
1980 8,536 3.0%
1990 7,420 −13.1%
2000 7,032 −5.2%
2010 7,094 0.9%
Est. 2012 7,180 1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
2012 Estimate[10]

The median income for a household in the city was $26,906, and the median income for a family was $34,705. Males had a median income of $41,366 versus $23,387 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,486. About 14.4% of families and 19.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.4% of those under age 18 and 9.6% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 7,094 people, 3,038 households, and 1,756 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,068.2 inhabitants per square mile (798.5 /km2). There were 3,421 housing units at an average density of 997.4 per square mile (385.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 96.5% White, 1.2% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.1% of the population.

There were 3,038 households of which 26.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.6% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.2% were non-families. 35.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.80.

The median age in the city was 39.6 years. 20.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 12.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.2% were from 25 to 44; 26.1% were from 45 to 64; and 17.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.0% male and 52.0% female.

Geography[edit]

Elkins is located at the confluence of the Tygart Valley River and Leading Creek.[11] The average elevation is 2,000 feet (610 m) above sea level. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.43 square miles (8.88 km2), all of it land.[2] Elkins is headquarters for the Monongahela National Forest, a 910,155-acre (368,327 ha) reserve encompassing the "High Alleghenies" area to the east of the city.

In 1995, a second edition of The 100 Best Small Towns in America, written by Norman Crampton, featured Elkins among the special places in the United States. Crampton quoted then Editor Emerita of The Inter-Mountain, Eldora Marie Bolyard Nuzum, "You can stand on any street in Elkins and turn in all directions and see forest covered mountains rimming the city. It is unbelievable." [12]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Elkins, West Virginia (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 78
(26)
77
(25)
86
(30)
90
(32)
93
(34)
96
(36)
99
(37)
99
(37)
97
(36)
87
(31)
82
(28)
76
(24)
99
(37)
Average high °F (°C) 39.0
(3.9)
42.8
(6)
51.7
(10.9)
62.8
(17.1)
70.7
(21.5)
77.9
(25.5)
81.0
(27.2)
80.2
(26.8)
73.7
(23.2)
64.0
(17.8)
53.3
(11.8)
42.3
(5.7)
61.6
(16.4)
Average low °F (°C) 19.4
(−7)
21.5
(−5.8)
28.0
(−2.2)
36.6
(2.6)
45.5
(7.5)
54.6
(12.6)
59.0
(15)
58.0
(14.4)
50.7
(10.4)
38.4
(3.6)
30.5
(−0.8)
22.7
(−5.2)
38.7
(3.7)
Record low °F (°C) −24
(−31)
−22
(−30)
−15
(−26)
3
(−16)
20
(−7)
25
(−4)
32
(0)
34
(1)
26
(−3)
11
(−12)
−8
(−22)
−28
(−33)
−28
(−33)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.22
(81.8)
3.09
(78.5)
3.95
(100.3)
3.79
(96.3)
5.12
(130)
4.39
(111.5)
5.36
(136.1)
3.84
(97.5)
3.63
(92.2)
2.85
(72.4)
3.38
(85.9)
3.26
(82.8)
45.88
(1,165.3)
Snowfall inches (cm) 25.2
(64)
18.5
(47)
12.1
(30.7)
5.5
(14)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
.4
(1)
5.2
(13.2)
16.8
(42.7)
83.8
(212.9)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 17.9 15.5 16.4 15.2 15.4 14.8 14.4 12.8 11.1 11.5 13.2 16.7 174.8
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 12.7 10.5 6.9 3.3 0 0 0 0 0 .5 3.8 10.0 47.7
Source: NOAA (extremes 1899–present)[13]
Records
  • Record high: 99 °F (37 °C) on July 16, 1988 and on August 6, 1918
  • Highest daily min: 78 °F (26 °C) on July 21, 1930
  • Lowest daily max: −6 °F (−21 °C) on December 25, 1983
  • Record low: −28 °F (−33 °C) on December 30, 1917
  • Highest one-day snowfall: 19.9 inches (51 cm), on December 19, 2009.
  • Highest one-day precipitation: 5.02 inches (12.8 cm), on November 4, 1985.

Events[edit]

  • Augusta Heritage Festival—A music and heritage festival, with 10+ themes ranging from Old Time, Blue Grass, Cajun, Irish, dance, wood and metal working and more. Attracting musicians and students from around the world, it is held on the Davis and Elkins College campus and in town over 5 consecutive weeks every summer, typically in July and August. There is also a week long Old Time event in October, and a dulcimer week in the spring.[14]
  • Mountain State Forest Festival—An annual, early fall festival and fair held on the streets of Elkins and on the Davis and Elkins College Campus. Lasts several days in early fall; the 70th annual event was held in 2006.[15]
  • Pickin' in the Park—A Wednesday afternoon Old Time fiddling get-together in the park. Every Wednesday, all year long; indoors in the winter, nearby.
  • Randolph County International Ramp Cookoff and Festival—An annual festival at city park and on the Davis & Elkins College campus at the end of April. The focus of this celebration is the ramp, an indigenous herb which is prevalent in the Elkins region. Featuring a cooking competition of ramp inclusive recipes, other activities include concerts, craft vendors and more.[16]

Transportation[edit]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Broughton, Van. http://www.wboy.com/story/21529151/new-mayor-one-new-city-council-member-in-elkins.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  3. ^ "Elkins, West Virginia". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-24. 
  5. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-26. 
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 117. 
  8. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  9. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved August 27, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved August 27, 2013. 
  11. ^ West Virginia Atlas & Gazetteer. Yarmouth, Me.: DeLorme. 1997. p. 37. ISBN 0-89933-246-3. 
  12. ^ Crampton, Norman, The 100 Best Towns in America, 2nd Edition, McMillan, Inc., New York, New York, 134-37.
  13. ^ "NowData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2013-06-30. 
  14. ^ Augusta Heritage Center
  15. ^ Mountain State Forest Festival
  16. ^ Randolph County Festival

External links[edit]